(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "73 Magazine (October 1995)"


OCTOBER 1995 
ISSUE #421 

USA $3.95 
CANADA $4.95 

A WGI Publication 
International Edition 



r\ 



Solar 

VFOs 



ners 
era 



y 



I 



i 



i 



Ham to Ham 



UL 



XS-20 QRP 






Maggiore Hi 
epeater 



I 



B Wk i B\ 




1 


o H 

1 


|q 74851' 


08725 i ' 









Limited Time Offer! 



FREE INFRARED MIC 



UPGRADE! 



When you buy 
an IC-270()H\ 



A $ 140°°value! 

(if purchased separately) 



IC-2700H 



New Cutting-Edge Features... 




D C«vfr»2Mtl44-MSIAHi)afid 
UHF (440-45® MHi) 

Q SO W VHF, 35 W UHF (stletrcbia) 
Delarbubk Front ?«tl 
3 Channel Snatch Fad Mrmor y 
Sff oral* Tyrring Din I, Volume and 
Squelch Control for Endi Band 
FULL Remote Corttiol Microphone 

□ I K F R AH ED ft* roleit Mitrophe he 
D 3 Repealer Quick Momoriat 

G 1 1& Total Memory Locution! 

D Removable DTWF Control 

D Auto Repeater Duplex Direction 

□ V/V or U/U - Slmultoneous fla«h* 
of 2 Signals on the Same Band 

D Built-in Pager and Code Squelch 

D 24 Squelch Levels 

□ One-touch PTT with Time-out Timer 

□ Tone Scan (w/ optional UT-84J 




Ae 1C-2~00H features a Detochoble 
Front Panel* With the optional mounting 
kit you can mount the faceplate in an 
easy-io-see location while keeping the 
main body in a secure place, such as the 
trunk of your car With its Easy to Read 
Display aJI indications are visible and 
separate for each band providing safe 
operation while driving, 

Jin K 270W has Independent Controls 
and Switches for each band. Often-used 

dials and switches for each band are 
duplicated, providing true dual hand 
operation in V/V, l/U or V/tl modes, 

Transmitted frequencies are auto- 
matically entered into Scratch Pad 
Memories for easy recall. Each band 



has 6 scratch pads, 3 fur duplex settings 
I repeater use) and 5 for simplex 
settings The Memory Allocation 
Function allows utu to divide the 
memory dttnncK k ■ l ween bands to suit 
your preferences - 20 to 80 memories 
can he allocated to a hand for a I hand 
total of 100, 

The Auto Repeater Function automati- 
cally selects the proper duplex offset 
direction, allowing you lo work 
repeaters with ease. 

The optional Tone Scan Function scans 
for and sets the su baud! hie tone 
frequency befog transmitted by another 
Station for you. This is especially helpful 
when travelling in unfamiliar territory. 




* Enjoy full remote control of all 
transceiver functions. Willi the 
1IM-90A you can even operate the 
1C-2700H from the back seat! 

Hurry today - offer flood only while 
supplies last. 



IC-2340H 



A 



□ Covers 2 M 1144-148 MH*) and 
UHf (440-450 MHz) 

D 45 W VHF, 35 W UHF Uelcclabto) 

H Independent Contrail 

□ 110 Tolol Memory Location! 
P Auto Repeater Offiet Function 
D Remote DTMF Mic fapt. UT 55] 
O 14 Autodfafing Memories 

G Erect frequency tnpur {opt. Ur55J 

Z One -push Ac!"or BuHcnt 

[J Built-in Dirpfeur 

D 2.4WA»dro 

O Large, Easy la R tod On ploy 

□ Tow 5<on [opt. UT-89) 

O Voice Syniht u»r (opt. U7-«) 

Q Opliosal Foftr and Cade 5q«!dt 

Zj Optional Tooe Squelch and 
Pocket teep 



ttS 



a a a 



True Dual-Band Operation 



fC-2jWH rrith supplied HM- 7 T WW Microphone. 






r? n p"j n 



jti 






K-2340H 

The IC-2540H offers Independent 
Controls and Switches for each hand 
(VFQ/MHz. Memory/Call. Volume/ 
Squelch and main tuning dial) for Trie 
Dual Band Operation Both frequencies 
arc stacked" for quick visual reference 
and greater driving safety. 

Easy to read in ambient light or 
direct sunlight the iC-2540Hs Lttrge 



Display is easy to 
view and operate, 

tun wink driving. 

SAVE _ 

•B0*/ 

When vou buy the tC-2;M)H before 
ll> ; See dealer for details. 

One Push Bo t to it Controls allow you to 
adjust functions on your IC-23-iOH with 
a single push of a button. This offers 
increased operating convenience and 
safety while dm in £ 




The IC2.VIUH features 110 Memory 
Channels (each hand has SO regular 
memories. 2 scratch P^d memories. 

t rail channel and 2 scan edges). 

The [C-2540H also offers both an Auto 
Repeater Function and optional Tone 
Scan Function fust as with the IC-2'OOII, 
IC-2340H will automalicaUy select the 
proper duplex and offset direction for 
repeater operations it will also scan for 
and set the subaudthle tone frequency 
being transmitted h\ other stations. 



Call our Brochure Hotline (or FREE literature 
on ICOM radios: (206) 450-6088! 



o 



(toner JiSHJB « i^»nMf fftS rCU 

* to* Ik II dtfri 

lirfur^mipfc^iiMiiiiiitrTi 

■fl 





CIRCLE 1T9 QN READER SERVICE CARD 



HF & VHF 

AT THE SAME TIME 




ENJOY THE 




The KAM Plus offers more perfor- 
mance than any other TNC in its 
price range. It can operate any of the 
popular HF modes (including the 
highly effective G-TQR mode) and 
VHF packet at the same time. The 
KAM Plus also provides more than 
100K of personal mailbox space, And 
like other Kantronics TNCs, its design 

is thoroughly con- 
■J| IrfSlJT 1 temporary; the 
■■""■■ ' KAM Plus is small 

and uses very Little 
power. It also lea 
tures remote 
access, so all KAM 
Plus commands are 
available from a 
remote location. 



Move up to the KAM Plus. 

Isn't it time you spread your wings? 






For more information, contact your 

amhoriied Kantronics dealer or Kantronics at 

1202 E. 23rd St., Lawrence. KS 66046-5006 

913-842-7745 FAX 9 13-842-20 3 L 




I 




k 



The new Hi-Performance line 
is a hi-prqfessional range of 
mobile antennasjor the 
discriminating Radio Amateur. 
Best material quality, 
hi-tech design and maximum 
performance; this the result 
of years of experience and 
technological research by Siiio. 
Hi-Performance line, 
second to none 11 

We are looking for distributors 
in the U.S.A. please, contact us J 



I 









HP 2070 



See us at the 1 5th Hong Kong Electronics 
Fair (October 11 /14th). 



urn 







antenne 



Strada dei Colli Sud, 1 /Q - 46049 VOLTA MANTOVANA - MN - ITALY 

Tel. (39) 376/801515 -Fax (39) 376/801254 



THE TEAM 

PUBLISHER 

Wayne Greer W2NSD/1 

SENIOFVTECHNICAL EDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

MANAGING EDITOR 

David Witham 

EDITORS 
Joyce Sawtefle 
victor Lapuszynski 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Bill Brown WB8ELK 
Mike Bryce WB8VGE 
Joseph E.CarrK4lPV 
Michael Geier KB 1UM 
Jim Gray W1 XU/7 
Chuck Houghton W86IGP 
Dr. Marc Leavey WA3AJR 
Andy MaeAlfisier WA5ZIB 
Joe Moell KOOV 
Garofe Perry WB2MGP 
Jeffrey SlomanNlEWO 

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER 
Gerry Foss 

1-603-924-0058 
1-800-274-7373 
FAX: 1-603-924-9327 

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS 
Mike Nugent WB8GLQ 
Various Authors 

GRAPHICS MANAGER/ 
PAGINATION 

Linda Drew 

DESIGN/PRODUCTION 
Joan Ahem 

GRAPHIC SERVICES 

Film Works, Jnc, 
Antnm NH 

CIRCULATION 

To subscribe; 1-800-677-8838 

WAYNE GREEN, INC, 

Editorial Offices 
70 Route 202N 
Peterborough NH 03458 
1 -603-924-0058; 
FAX: 1-603-924-9327 

Subscription Services 
1 -300-677-8838 
Foreign Subscribers 
1-60^461-8432 

Reprints $3.00 per article. 
Back issues: 34.00 each. 

Write to 73 Amateur Radio Today, 
Reprints, 70 Route 20£N, 
Peterborough, NH 03458 

Printed in the LISA by 

Quad Graphics, 
TTtomaston, Georgia. 



10 



14 



20 



26 



32 



34 



44 



46 



48 



52 



73 Amateur 

Radio Today 



October 1995 

Issue #421 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 






The QRP Delight 

A full-featured antenna tuner with built-in SWR meter... AD5X 

DDS Dream VFO 

Yes, you can build your own synthesizer! KD1JV 

Portable Solar Electric Power Generator 

The sun is free for the using , K4SYU 

Armstrong Updated 

A high-performance, regenerative short-wave 

receiver, , „_.KC3ZQ 

Link it All! 

Why settle for operation on just two bands? ,. ...WB9YBM 

Boring Beacons! 

Making additional use of beacon signals. N6JSX 

Senior Citizens Upgrade 

A lifetime of ham experience 
should count!..... WN3UWH 

QRP Mini-Tuner 

A neat little addition to your 
rio WU0L 



DEPARTMENTS 



REVIEWS 



The Ramsey Electronics 
SX-20 QRP SSB/CW 
20m Transceiver 

A QRP Powerhouse KT2B 

The Maggiore Hi Pro 
R1 Repeater 

A full-featured repeater at an 

affordable price ,.„«„ K1ZJH 




68 


Above and Beyond 


73 


Ad Index 


56 


Ask K a boom 


91 


Barter 'n* Buy 


55 


Carr s Corner 


17 


Feedback Index 


72 


Ham HeJp 


71 


Ham to Ham 


66 


Hams with Class 


68 


Hamsats 


62 


Homing In 


6 


Letters 


4 


Never Say Die 


68 


New Products 


60 


Propagation 


61 


QRP 


6 


QRX 


60 


RTTY Loop 


65 


Special Events 


66 


Uncle Wayne's 




Bookshelf 



FEEDBACK... 
FEEDBACK! 

Tfs Mice being tJierc — ngtit 
here in our offices I How? 
Just lake advantage of 
our FEEDBACK list on 
page 17. You'll notice 
a feedback number a i 
the beginning of each 
article and column. 
Wed like \ ou 10 i ate 
what you read so ltk.it 
we can pnni w hat types 
of things you like best. 



Mtke Spasoft KE6QNM and Dan Radovich KE6SOO on the Mars Rover. 
Read ail about it in 'Hams With Class" an page 66, 



On the cover: "What is he, an agent for the UFOs?" Actually, he's Dave Hess KD6LZA, 
and you can find out what he does with this outfit in "Homing In" on page 62. 



-Tie 



Editorial Offices 
70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03458 

phone: 603-924-0058 

Advertising Offices 

70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03456 
phone: 800-274-7373 

Circulation Offices 
70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03456 

phone: 603-924-0058 



Manuscripts Contributions in the form of manuscripts with drawings and/or photographs are 
welcome and wilt be considered for possible publication. We can assume no responsibility for 
toss or damage to any matenal. Please enclose a stamped, self -addressed envelope with each 
submission Payment for the use of any unsolicited matenal will be made upon publication. 
P tease submit all material on disk as an IBM -compatible ASCII fite. All contributions should be 
directed to the 73 editorial offices. "How to Write for Z3™ guidelines are available upon request. 
US citizens must include their Social Security number with submitted manuscripts 

73 Amateur Radio Today (ISSN 1052-2522) ts published monthly by Wayne Green lnc, P 70 
Route 202 North. Peterborough NH 03458. Entire contents '1995 by Wayne Green Inc. No part 
of this publication may be reproduced without written permisson of the publisher. For Subscrip- 
tion Services, write to 73 Amateur Radio Today, P.O. Box 7693, Rlverton NJ 08077 7693, or call 
1-800-289 0388, The subscription rate is: one year $24.97 t two years $39.97; Canada: $34.21 
for one year, $57.75 for two years, including postage and 7% GST, Foreign postage: £19.00 sur- 
face or £42.00 airmail additional per year. All foreign orders must be accompanied by payment in 
US lunds. Second class postage paid at Peterborough, NH, and at additional mailing offices. 
Canadian second class mail registration * 178101. Canadian GST registration #125393314. Mi- 
crofilm Edition— University Microfilm, Ann Arbor Ml 48106 POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to 73 Amateur Radio Today. P.O. Box 7693, Riverton NJ 08077-7693, 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 3 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



N 



EVER SAY DIE 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 



Money Ideas 

There are good solid money- 
making ideas going by you every 
day. That's not important if you 
have all the money you need, and 
your wife does, too (which is highly 
unlikely), t think the complaint I hear 
the most from readers has to do 
with money. Hey r it's out there: all 
you have to do is keep your eyes, 
ears, and mind open for opportune 
ties. 

For instance, I was reading an 
article in Forbes about the popular* 
ity of low-powered FM transmitters. 
The article mentioned an FM trans- 
mitter kit available from Pan-Corn 
International by mail order for S130. 
It also mentioned a 20- watt amplifi- 
er kit from Ramsey fof SI 00. So 1 
checked the Ramsey ad in 73 and 
found mat they also have a nice lit- 
tle FM transmitter kit for $35* For 
another $15 you can get a case for 
it and an antenna, Hey, for $50 
you're on the air with a few milli- 
watts. Not legally of course. And it's 
even worse if you invost the extra 
hundred in an amplifier and start 
broadcasting your own call-in talk 
show to your neighborbood. Watch 
out, Rush! 

The chances of being caught 
seem remote, unless you irritate 
your listening audience enough so 
they complain to the Candy Compa- 
ny. The FCC's response, when irri- 
tated enough to track down FM 
band pirates, is usually to confis- 
cate the station. Ol course, if you 
have a ham ticket they will proba- 
bly lift that. too. so I'm not even re- 
motely suggesting that you set up 
an FM station, start broadcasting, 
and sell advertising. But. as a ham h 
and presumably with some radio 
smarts, you might be able to help 
people who want to be able to play 
music around their home or busi- 
ness without having to install a 
bunch of wires. I know I'd like to be 
able to listen to my CDs when I'm 
out digging up dandelions or picking 
raspberries. My lawn produced over 
500 pounds of dandelions this 
spring. 

The public, with few exceptions, 




are panicked by anything efectrical. 
Our schools have, for the most part, 
slopped bothenng to teach science, 
so most people haven't a clue as to 
how electricity or radio equipment 
works. Thus, when faced with a de- 
sire to use something radioish, they 
turn in frustration to anyone they 
can find (or help. 

W you were to advertise that you 
can install a miniature FM transmit* 
ter for people to play music around 
their home or office for $249.95, 
you might be able to make some 
money I know I could. Anyone who 
has a hi-fi system would be a good 
target for a sale, Imagine being able 
to load your CD player with a stack 
of CDs and listen to the music you 
want while you do yard work. 

The circuit for the blood purifier 
I've been writing about ts dirt simple 
for any ham to construct. Its little 
more than a small radio battery with 
a relay to reverse the polarity and 
apply a low voltage to the ankles in 
order to pass about 50 microam- 
peres of current through the blood 
going through the leg arteries. Tins 
is reported by the Albert Einstein 
School of Medicine as a way to 
wipe out HIV, herpes, and a few 
other miseries caused by bugs in 
the blood. I've had calls from peo- 
ple with AIDS who are desperate to 
make a unit, but who are complete- 
ly unable to deal with the simple cir- 
cuit. They've visited their neighbor- 
hood Radio Shack, and found no 
help there. So I tell 'em to find a lo- 
cal ham, Knowing the power of the 
FDA, et aL which seem dedicated 
to keeping AIDS an incurable dis- 
ease, I'm afraid to get involved any 
more closely. 

If you have been living in a cave 
and aren't aware of what the FDA, 
the medical establishment, and the 
drug and insurance companies are 
up to. then it s time for you to come 
out of the cave and start reading a 
little. There's no shortage of books 
and newsletters to educate you. til 
have to review the Christopher Bird 
book on Gaston Naesens for you, 
for starters. Then you'll want to read 
about Royal Rife. Wilhelm Reich. 



and a few others who've been their 
victims. Its almost enough to make 
a person think. 

Lots of New Ideas 

For instance 1 at the Monaco cold 
fusion conference I met Jerome 
Drexler. who's making LaserCards 
This credit-card-sized card can opti- 
cally store up to six megabytes of 
data. Thafs around 2,400 typewrit- 
ten pages of information. Now. how 
many applicaiKms can you think of 
for this beaut? 

Hospitals are using it for health 
records their patients can carry with 
them. Imagine being able to carry 
around your complete life medical 
history! The Army is using them to 
eliminate tons of paperwork when 
handling or shipping supplies. Ship- 
ping lines are using them to keep 
track of cargoes in detail, thus elimi- 
nating paperwork and the filling out 
of forms. The shipments are 
marked by bar-codes and the 
record sent along on the Laser- 
Card. No more typing. Plus it 
speeds up dealing with customs in 
other cou nines. 

Other applications might be a 
color photo where identification is 
important. Maybe a voiceprint or a 
fingerprint? This could help elimi- 
nate credit-card fraud, which is 
costing us credit-card users billions 
a year. 

The company also makes a 
smart card with a built-in micropro- 
cessor, which has room for 1.5 
megabytes of data. The cards can 
be used to store data, pictures, soft- 
ware, PINS, your signature, and so 
forth 

So where do you come in? Hey t 
someone has to go out there and 
start selling the product. How many 
potential users are there within 
easy driving distance of you? The 
odds are that most companies 
haven t heard of the product, nor 
even thought about the potential 
benefits it could provide. 

Let's suppose that a major retaif- 
er wants to keep track of what their 
customers are buying and how of- 
ten. A card like this could let me as 



a customer buy anything I want and 
the store would automatically 
charge my Master Card account 
without any need for further identifi- 
cation. It would keep track of my 
purchases and issue me credit 
when they reached certain tar- 
gels — like frequent flier miles. 

Sony/Philips gets a ntckei royalty 
on every CD made. Wilh around a 
billion CDs being made a year, that 
kinda mounts up, doesn't il? If. as a 
sales agent for the card, you could 
get 5c each, it wouldn't be long be- 
fore you could afford to renew your 
73 subscription. And buy a Porsche. 

But there are endless new prod- 
ucts and services which need to be 
SOW or manufactured. Your success 
in life is limited only by your imagi- 
nation and ability actually to follow 
through witfi a project, 

Computer Service 

It doesn't take a world of smarts 
to fix computers, but if you get into 
the business you'll find that hun- 
dreds of local small businesses are 
gotng to be interested. Small com- 
panies cant afford to hire a comput- 
er guru to set up their system and 
keep it running, And, as a ham, pre- 
sumably you are not afraid to take 
the lid off the box and see what's 
gone wrong inside, lt p s probably the 
disk drive. Or a loose connection in 
the monitor. 

Operating out of your basement, 
spare room, or garage will give you 
the low overhead you need to com- 
pete with the big boys and build 
your customer list. Then, visit them 
every week or so and see how 
things are doing. Find out if they are 
happy. Tell them about new hard- 
ware or software that might benefit 
(heir business. Maybe you can get 
them onto the Internet and sell 
them a 28kbps modem to speed 
things up. 

I don't want to hear how you 
don't have the money for a sub- 
scription. I want to hear from you 
when I suggest we make a ham 
and scuba diving trip to Truk, and 
you tell me you have the money 
and are raring to go. If you're mak- 
ing plenty of money, what do you 
care if the new Kenwood or I com rig 
is $1,000 or $5,000? And if you 
aren't making money, why the heck 
not? It's out there in big gobs. But 
you do have to work for it, Well, ac- 
tually, it's more like funning for it. if 
you enjoy what you're doing. If 
youVe not having fun making mon- 
ey, jfs time to reorient your life. 
even if you have to start over and 
build new skills. 

Missed Opportunity? 

A letter from Harley W9ALU in- 
cluded a newspaper article about a 

Continued on page 74 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 




Now 

The Company That Takes 
Around The World Lets\buTake 

World Around VWth You. 




The Drake SW8 - Finally, Professional Desktop 
Performance In An Affordable, Portable World Band Shortwave, 



The company that has been 
setting the standards in premium- 
quality world band shortwave 
performance now puts top-of- 
the-line features and technology 
at your fingertips with the 
SW8. , . wtierever you want to 
take it Designed for both desktop 
use and easy portability, the 



Drake SW8 includes many of 
the same features that have made 
Drake a perennial favorite of 
experts - superb audio, versatility, 
and the unique combination of 
professional quality and functional 
simplicity. So tune in the world 
and get the best of all worlds - 
quality and affordability, desktop 



technology and portability. 
The Drake SW& 

To order your SW8 direct, 
jor more information, or for 

tbe deakr nmmt you call. 

1-800-968-7753 



DRAKE 





RL Drake Company- P.O. Bok 3006 • MiamistMirg, OH 45343'USA 



MP "N = 



CIRCLE 147 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Letters 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Bob Davis N30YA Well, Uncle 
Wayne, youVe b©en pestering me 
to write, so here goes. Thanks for 
bugging the heck out of compla- 
cent hams like me and getting us 
Out there doing something. As per 
your instructions, i have started 
my own business (in my spare 
time, at least, until it takes off and I 
can quit the broadcasting busi- 
ness}, making and selling custom- 
made drums. I also am involved 
with teaching young drummers 
and percussionists the ethereal art 
of drumming. 

There's more: My business, 
called RPO Consulting, also advis- 
es various organizations in the 
field of sound reinforcement, such 
as churches, parks, etc. This stuff 
keeps me busy, as you can imag- 
ine, and it doesn't pay very well 
(yet), but I find the time for more 
musical undertakings, such as lo- 
cal community bands and my own 
band, Royal Disaster, which plays 
all manner of music, from The 
Beatles to the Allman Bros. I even 
get a little time in for hamming with 
my local dub and casual operation 
hunting special-event stations. 
Boy, do I love those colorful bits of 
paper! 

I enjoy your editorials; don't ev- 
er stop raising a ruckus. I have 
even dared (gasp!) to research the 
basics of cold fusion, and have 
been deluged with so-called edu- 
cated people who insist that the 
concept is rubbish. Oh, did I men- 
tion that the majority of the non-be- 
lievers have never bothered to find 
out the tiniest modicum of back- 
ground? For instance, a very good 
friend of mine, who happens to be 
as far away from science as one 
can be (he has degrees in history 
and classics), insists that the idea 
of cold fusion is bunk. I even let 
him read a few of your editorials 
on the subject but he remains 
unswayed. He did, however, enjoy 
the rest of the content. 

Hey, Unk. lei me tell ya a story. 
When I first began reading 73 and 
saw your editonals decrying smok- 
ing, drinking, and all those other 
supposedly nasty things. I said to 
myself, "Stuffy old codger— he 
don't know what he's missing." 
Well, let me tell you this: I was the 
one missing out. With the help of 
my girlfriend and Uncle Wayne, 
I've been smoke-free for 5 months 
now, and plan to remain so. As 
you're probably aware — and you 



From the Ham Shack 

can let your readers know this— 
quitting the habit is not a co3d- 
turkey undertaking! It's something 
one lives with day by day. Even to- 
day, not waking up with a craving 
for Philip Morris is a small victory, 
and you should see me when I 
walk past that ever-present rack 
on the way to the gas station's 
counter! As that wise man, Me! 
Brooks, says: "OyT If you ever 
need a session drummer tor your 
recording studio, let me know. Six 
years after the Wright Brothers 
flew, Edison was stiff insisting that 
man would never fty t , . Wayne, 

Scott Robbins KY2PJ I read 

with interest your ponlificating on 
the state of the ham radio busi- 
ness in the July issue of 73. As an 
employee of a major retailer of 
ham radio equipment for the last 
year, I'd like to share a few obser- 
vations. 

First, you're right about the no- 
code licensees not buying all-band 
HF rigs and not upgrading their li- 
censes. There are a couple of 
good reasons for this. The aver- 
age person who gets a no-code li- 
cense has just wanted to get a 
step up from CB radio. They've 
tired of the yelling and all the other 
nonsense you hear all day on 27 
MHz h and see 2 meters as their 
salvation from this mess. There 
are also a significant minority of 
no-coders who are getting in- 
volved in the hobby because they 
see the autopatch systems as a 
substitute lor cellular telephones 
and are not in the slightest inter- 
ested in anything else to do with 
ham radio. 

Secondly as a ham of 13 years. 
I am absolutely appalled at the 
lack of technical knowledge the 
new ham community has. Very, 
very basic stuff, like how much 
current your new mobile rig will 
draw or why an 11* tall antenna 
has no gain is beyond the grasp of 
many new licensees and. what's 
more T they really don't care! All 
that technical "crap™ is in the way 
of doing what they want which is 
to get their mobile rig set up (with 
an unobtrusive antenna, of course) 
and hit the repeaters. The ripple 
effect of this has been that many 
of these people do upgrade in or- 
der to get on HF SSB and then are 
absolutely clueless about basics 
like proper grounding, antenna 
construction, even how to solder 



on a PL*259? The 90s are the age 
of the solderless ham, believe me. 

The next comment I'd like to 
make is about the profit margin in- 
volved in selling ham radio gear. 
TwenTy-fjve percent?! You can't be 
serious if you think we're making 
25% profit selling ham gear; 5% to 
10% is the standard these days, 
and often it's even lower Why? 
The yen/dollar issue is certainly 
part of it, because prices are so 
high that it's putting good gear out 
of reach, but really its because the 
competition is incredible. We keep 
track of our competition's pricing, 
we know what the rigs cost, and 
we're ail taking a bath for the most 
part. I'm not cooing for sympathy 
with that statement— it's fact. You 
know as well as I do that even 
having a five dollar better price on 
the competition on a S2.O0O HF rig 
can mean you get the sale, and 
that sale will be made by whoever 
has the lowest price, period. Saw 
a great price on a rig in the ads to- 
day? Probably a stow moving item 
that a dealer is dumping at or near 
cost to get his capital invested 
somewhere else. In the meantime, 
were not able to match that price 
and can't move inventory. Amateur 
radio sales is a highly competitive 
business and I challenge your as- 
sertion that there are "so few^ ham 
dealers now. There are too many, 
selling gear at such a low profit 
margin that it makes it really tough 
to keep our heads above water. Al- 
so, (to the public) don't you think 
for a minute that the salesman an- 
swering the phone is making a 
killing off of you. For the amount of 
information you need to have in 
your head to be able to compe- 
tently sell items from many, many 
companies, not to mention the 
technical aspect, we don't take 
home as much as that from a com- 
parable job, at least in my city. 

In my opinion, the only thing 
driving sales in the ham business 
right now is the no-code Tech li- 
cense. Without it a lot of us would 
be looking for work right now 
rather than dogging the 800 lives. 
The only way the ham business is 
going to survive in the cut-throat 
90s is for these new hams to be 
instilled with technical knowledge, 
upgraded licenses, and cheaper 
gear. The prognosis: We'll see. 

Terry Weinhold N3EUL Permit 
me to voice my opinions on "Never 
Say Dier July 95 issue, concern- 
ing codeless Techs, and an "artifi- 
cial and new irrelevant code barri- 
er. ... f ' I am currently a General 
class operator, licensed over 11 
years, with my main interests be- 



ing HR CW. and phone as weH as 
2m FM, I am a very active ama* 
ieur, and my age is 40. Trying to 
look at codeless licenses objec- 
tively. I believe it was a mistake to 
form this license class because, 
after being active for years, \ have 
seen a degeneration in T shall I say 
the intellect of 2m operators. With- 
out prior knowledge of their license 
class. I can reliably pick out who 
has the no-code Tech license due 
to their on-the-air speech and 
manners, I'm sure you have heard 
this before, but 2m sounds just like 
the CB band does, and when we 
had a code requirement I noted a 
higher-quality operator. "The ham 
population is declining, so we had 
to form a codeless license to at- 
tract more people, 1 ' Really? Sir. I 
will say, and perhaps I speak for 
the majority, if the code require- 
ment for HF is eliminated in this 
country, I tear the bands will be 
one gigantic CB band. At this time, 
all the good operators will say its 
time to sell the gear and get out 
Then they wilt have a declining 
amateur population! 

I would be pleased to see the 
amateur population grow, espe- 
cially among young people, but 
please, lets not sacrifice quality for 
quantity. 

By the way. I did enjoy your por- 
tion on weight control, and my 
congratulations to your wife and 
yourself. I have recently lost 10 
pounds, and your article was an 
inspiration to me. 

Pete Theiller KI4KN I always 
enjoy reading your editorials and, 
based on your recommendations, 
have been reading about the influ- 
ences of electric and magnetic 
fields on life processes. 

Years ago a friend of mine in 
Europe used a device that passed 
a minute electric current (in the or- 
der of 50 to 200jiA) through the 
body. This was simply a battery, 
meter, pot, and electrodes. In fact. 
I think it was a commercially avail- 
able device. This friend suffered 
from fainting spells and other dis- 
orders. He swore that this device 
helped him by stimulating his 
blood circulation and that it could 
ateo speed up heating. I had not 
taken any of this too seriously until 
I began reading Cross Currents by 
Robert O. Becker, M.D. and decid- 
ed that there may be something to 
it. From what I have read the cur- 
rent fs probably still way too much 
atSOjiA. 

Thanks for your help and keep 
giving us hell in your editorials; 
most of us are just too compla- 
cent. 



6 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 









LOW NOISE 
RECEIVER PREAMPS 



LNG-D 

still only $59 

wjrgd&tcstod 



FEATURES: 

• Very low noise: Q.7dB nf vhf, 8dB uhf 

* High gain: 13-20dB (depends on freq) 

* Wide dynamic range - resist overload 

• Stable: dual-gate GAS FET 

■Speeffy tuning range: 26-30, 46-56 r 137-13Q, 139- 
152, 152-172, 210-230, 400-470. 800-960 MHz. 

LNW-T) 

MINIATURE 
PREAMP 

still only $29 kit. $44 wired&tested 
■ Low-cost M OS FET preamp, 

• Small size. Only 5/8"W x 1-576'L x ^"H> 

• Nf 1.2dBvhf, 1.5dBubf. 

* Solder terminals for coax & pwr connect. 

*Sp9Gify tuning range; 25-35. 35-55, 55-9C, 30-120, 
120-1 50, 150-200. 200-270, 400-500 Nihil. 

LNS-H 

IN-LINE 
PREAMP 

ONLY $89 kit, $119 wiredfi tested 

* Automatically switches out of lino 
during transmit 

* GaAs FET Pre amp with features similar 
to LNG series. 

• Use with base or mobile transceivers up 

to25W\ 

*Tuning range: 1 SO- 175, 200-240, Qr4&Q~50Q. 



HELICAL RESONATORS 



Helical resonator 
filters may reduce 
your intermod & 
cross-band inter- 
ference. 



MOOEL HRF* { * }, $59 vhf, $9$ uhf, 

'Specify tuning range: 136-140, 142-150, 150-162, 
W2-174, 213-233. 420-470. 



RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 



Low noise 
converters to 
receive vhf 
& uhf bands 
on a 10 W receiver. 

• Input ranges avail: 50-52, 13G~138 r 
144-146, 145-147, 146-148, 220-222, 222- 
224 MHz, 432-434, 435-437, 435.5^437.5, 
and 439.25 (atv conv. to chan 3) 

• Kit less case $48 f kit w/case & BNC 
jacks $79, w&t in case $59. 



TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 



REPEATER CONTROLLERS 









— ™^ 

XV2 for vhf and XV4 for uhf. Models to 
convert 1QM ssb r cw, fm, etc. to 2U r 432, 
435 n and atv. 1W output. Kit only $89 
(vhf), $99 {Uhf}. PA's up to 45W available... 



sP&f 




^w 



(specify call) 



j T*aT Eprom- 
cortr oiled, minia- 
ture, easy to build, 
low power CMOS, 
only $54 kit, $79 w/t 






Q 



COR-6. COR & 
Real Voice ID 
on one board. 
Digital ic records 
up to 20 sec- 
onds of your 
voice. Can rec- 
ord multiple id 
messages. TaiJ 

and time-out timers, courtesy beep, 
state relay to key transmitter. 
kit$99 T w&t$149 




solid - 




COR-3. COR h timers, court, beep ..kit $49 

CVvlD. Diode programmable kit $59 

COR-4. Complete COR and CWID all on 
one board. CMOS logic for tow power 
consumption, EFRQM programmed; 

(specify call) kit $99, w&t$149 



ACCESSORIES 



DVR-1 DIOITAL VOICE RECORDER. Re- 
cords up to 20 sec. of your voice with built- 
in mEc. or external mic. Terrific as voice 
I D'er for repeaters or fox hunt xmtr, con- 
test calEer, radio 
notepad, etc. Ex- 
tensive manual teEls 
how to use multiple 
messages adapt to 
many applications. 
kit $59, w&t S99 

TM SELECTIVE CALLING Module. 
Versatile dtmf controller with 1 latching 
output. Mutes speaker until someone 
calls by sending your 4 -dig it tt code. Or 

use it with a long tt zero digit to alert any- 
one in club. Also may be used to control 
auto patch or other single device, 

kit$49,w&t$79 

TD-3 CTCSS (SUB AUDIBLE TONE) DE- 
CODER/ENCODER kit $29, w/t $59 



AUTO PATCHES 



AP-3 REPEATER AUTOPATCH. Reverse 
patch and phone line remote control. 
kit $89, wired & tested $139 

AP-2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
Board. Use with above for simplex oper- 
ation using a transceiver kit $39 

TD*2 OTIWF DECODER/CONTROLLER. 
16 digits, jumper-programmable, toil-call 

restrictor. Can turn 5 functions on7ofr\ 
kit $79, wired & tested $129 



DATA MODEMS 



MO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR & 

DE-202 DEMODULATOR. Run up to 
1200 baud digital signafe through any fin 
transmitter & receiver kits $49, w&t$79 

9600 BA~UdSg]TAL RF LINKS. Call for 

info on low-cost packet networking sys- 
tem: MO-96 Modem and special versions 
of our 144, 220, or 450 MHz fm xrntrs and 
rcvrs. Use directly with most TNC's. Fast, 
diode-switched PA's output 15 or SOW. 



WWV RECEIVER 



Get time and freq checks without jr*^"^ 

buying expensive hf rcvr Very ^f^V 

sensitive and selective 

xtal controlled superhet, 

dedicated to listening to 

WvWon10 000MHz 

... only $59 kit, $99 w/t 




• Buy at low, factory-direct net prices and save! 

■ For complete info, call or write for free catalog. 

(Send $2 for overseas air mail) 

• Order by mail, fax, or phonep-iz am, 1-5 pm eastern time). 

■ Min, $5 S&H charge for first pound plus adds weight & insurance. 

• Use VISA, Mastercard, Discover, check, or UPS C.O.D. 



You get more features for your dollar with our 

REP-200 REPEATER 

A fully microprocessor-controlled repeater with auto patch 
and many versatile dtmf control features at less than you 
might pay for a bare-bones repeater or controller atone! 

Kit still only $1095 
w&t stiff only $1295 

50 & 9C0 MHz tanas siiattty fttqiwf 

• Available for the 50-54. 
143-174. 213 233, 420- 
475, 9G2-928 MHz bands. 

• FCC type accepted for 
commercial service in1 50 & 45G bands (Request catalog for details.) 

REP-200T Voice Message Repeater as above, except includes 

Digital Voice Recorder Allows message up to 20 sec to be remotely recorded off 
the air. Play back at user request by DTMF command, or as a periodical voice id, 
or both. Great for making club announcements!.. adds only £1001 

■ ■ ^ « ■ i i i ■ ' 

REP-200C Economy Repeater, uses cgr-6 controller (no dtmf 

control or autopatch). Features real-voice ID Kit only $795, w&t $1195 








REP-200N Repeater Want to use your own controller? No problem! We'll 
make you a repeater with rf modules only Kit only S69S, w&t $995 



XMTRS & RCVRS FOR REPEATERS, 
AUDIO & DIGITAL LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 



Also available in rf-ttgftt enclosures, and with data modems. 

FM EXCITERS: 2W continuous duty, 
FCC type accepted for com '/ bands. 

* TA51: 50-54, 143-174 r or 21 3-233MHz. 

* TA451 : 420-475 MHz . New tow price/ 
Either modef: kit $99, w/t $169. 

* TA901 : 902-928 MHz, (O.SVV out); 
New low price? w/t $199, 

VHF & UHF AMPLIFIERS. 

For fm, ssb, atv. Output levels from 
1 0Wto 1G0W. Models starting at $99. 




FM RECEIVERS: 

jS^-7_ R100 FM RECEIVERS for 46-54, 
Vnew^ 72 .76, 140-175, or 216-225 MHz. 
~r*^ very sensitive - 0. 1 5uV s excep- 
tional selectivity - both crystal & ceramic if 
filters for >10GdB at ±l2kHz (best available 
anywhere), flutter-proofsquelch 

.New lowpric&l kit $129, w/t $189. 

* R4S1 FM RCVR, for 420-475 MHz. Similar 
to above New hw price! kit $129, w/t $189. 
■ R901 FM RCVR, for 9Q2-92BMHz. Tnple- 
con version. New fow prica $1 59, wft $21 9. 

t >v£ R1S0 MONITOR RCVR for 143-164 or 216-225 MHz. 4-channete. 
Vnew^ Great for monitoring repeaters, amateur calfing frequencies, packet ra- 

r%*F dio, commerciaf two-way radio, potioe/fire frequencies, or weather tore- 
casts Good starter kit. easy to assemble and align , kit only $99, w/t $189. 

* R120 AIRCRAFT RCVR for 110-136 MHz ...,„ kit only $99, w/t $219. 



WEATHER SATELLITE RECEIVER 



■^HBwci Our R138 is The IWost Affordable WeFax Receiver! 

"T^^f We used our 30+ years of experience in designing high-quality vhf re- 
ceivers to bring you this enhanced version of our Jong-popuiar WeFax Receiver, a 
very sensitive wideband fm receiver especially for amateur reception of NOAA and 

Meteosat weather facsimile images on the 137 MHz 
band. Use with demodulators and software from 
MuttiFax, SSC, A&A Eng., and others. Features 
2pV senaittvity 1 wideband filters for low distortion f 
and four crystal controlled channels at a fraction of 
the cost and complexity of synthesized units. Op- 
tional Scan Adapter allows you to automatically 
search for and record signals as satellites pass 
overhead while you are away from the shack. 

• R13B Receiver., $129 kit, S189 w/t 

• AS138 Scan Adapter , ....$39 kit, $69 w/t 

■ Linann-Sl crystals .......... d..** , % ,,,,,..^.. ........ •& it bb 

• ARRL Weather Satellite Handbook, „.$20 




Our33rtl YWr| 



mironics, inc 

65-D Wloul Rd; Hilton NY 14468-9535 
Phone 716-392-9430 (fax 9420) 



QRX. 



Number 3 on your Feedback card 



The Ham Arundel News 

We have just experienced two of the high- 
lights of the year I'd rate our annual picnic an 
overwhelming success. John N3MNM, and 
Sylvia Poulhaus did an outstanding job plan- 
ning and coordinating the event. The weather 
man cooperated, and the day turned out to be 
exquisite in all respects. The coordinators had 
much help with setting up. cooking, and clean- 
ing. The food was great and the company was 
exceptional. We even had entertainment; a 
magic show and a clown. Thanks to all who 
made this the best picnic yet. 

This past weekend the weather was not 
quite as cooperative for our annual Field Day, 
Lois Turner KA3VVQ and Bob Baltz N3MNT 
coordinated a very successful event. Lots 
worked out preliminary details and prepared a 
great dinner for those present on Saturday. I 
have always been amazed by the enthusiasm 
exhibited by Lois. She is definitely Ms. Field 
Day. Bob, in his usual efficient manner, super- 
vised the setup, operation, and takedown of the 
event. Bob is surely one of AARC's greatest as- 
sets. He never hesitates to help or participate in 
our club activities. 

Thanks again to all those who worked to 
make this a very successful Field Day week- 
end. It will be interesting to see our score for 
the event. Our intent was to enjoy the weekend 
with our friends, to learn more about radio, and, 
finally, to make contacts and score points. 
I think that afl of our stations fared quite 
well. We are indeed fortunate to have members 
who give up so much of their time to produce 
events that benefit afl of the members. TNX 
to Dick McKeivie KE3HQ. and Ham Arundel 
News 

Recording Pioneer Dies 

Marvin Camras, a pioneer of modern mag- 
netic sound recording, died Friday, June 23, at 
Evanston Hospital. He was 79. 

Mr. Camras, who lived in Glencoe for 40 
years, was a senior scientific advisor and a pro- 
fessor of electrical engineering at the Illinois In- 
stitute of Technology. 

Mr Camras helped develop multitrack tape 
recording, magnetic sound for motion pictures, 
and stereophonic sound reproduction. He is 
credited with discovering high frequency bias, 
His patents, numbering more than 500. have 
been licensed to more than 100 manufacturers. 
including IBM. Sony, and Kodak, and include 
several for magnetic and electronic storage on 
videotape and floppy disks. 

He was referred to as Ihe father of modem 
magnetic recording ." In addition to being induct- 
ed into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 
1965. Mr. Camras was awarded in 1990 a Na- 
tional Medal of Technology, the nation s highest 
award for technological achievement by Presi- 
dent George Bush, 

He was named "Inventor of the Year' in 1979 
by the Chicago Patent Law Association. As a 
hobby, he crafted violins and violas. 



Mr. Camras never officially retired from NT 
where he was a popular instructor, but took a 
leave of absence two years ago due to failing 
health. 

Bom in Chicago, he received his bachelor's 
degree in 1940 from Armour Institute of Tech- 
nology, now NT. He received his master's de- 
gree in 1942 from IIT. In 1978 ItT awarded him 
an honorary doctorate. 

"He was one of the really major figures in the 
development of electronics in the U.S.," said 
Lew Collens. president of the Illinois Institute of 
Technology, where Mr Camras worked and 
taught for more than 50 years. 

He moved us from wire recording to mag- 
netic recording, All of the video electronics we 
have today, as well as the audio, all that traces 
back to what Marvin did." 

Mr. Camras began building electrical devices 
when he was a child. At age 4. he built a flash- 
light, and at age 7, a transmitter. 

At age 22, in 1938, Mr. Camras developed 
magnetic tape, so his cousin, an aspiring opera 
singer, could record his singing in the shower. 
Magnetic recording was more precise than wire 
recording and paved the way for audio and 
videotape. 

Mike Wolfe N9CHQ said, "Marvin Camras 
W9CSX attended a number of NSRC meetings 
after giving a talk about his association with 
magnetic recording at a meeting in the early 
1990s:' 

i was Vice President at the time, and Art Ap* 
pel, who knew Marvin, told me that he would 
make a good speaker for a club meeting. Art 
helped arrange for the talk. It was a very highly 
attended meeting, as it is rare to get such a 
highly respected inventor to speak at a club 
meeting He demonstrated a wire recorder and 
played us a recording that was made many 
decades ago," 

Art Appel adds that Man/ was licensed since 
the 1920s. Art knew him 53 years and had 
worked with him 7 years, Marv received the 
Franklin Medal and an award from the Society 
of Motion Picture Engineers, He wrote Hand- 
hook of Magnetic Recording, which is still read 
today. He designed and buift his own house in 
Glencoe. TNX to the NSRC Transmitter 

Three Hams Die in LA 
Shooting 

Three Los Angeles-area amateurs are dead 
following a shooting rampage at a city facility. 

A disgruntled radio repairman lor the City of 
Los Angeles on July 19 is charged with killing 
four men, all supervisors at the city's Piper Tech 
Center. The three amateurs killed were Marty 
Wakefield N6BZ. 57, of Venice; Neil Carpenter 
KA6QIB. 61. of Palmdale; and Anthony Gain 
W6KFN. 78, of Montebello. A fourth supervisor 
who was killed in the attack, James Walton, 
was not a ham. 

Gain, an Advanced class licensee, was 
trustee for a repeater operated by the city. He 
had chosen to continue to work rather than re- 
tire, said a coworker, Rob Hanson AA6BN* 



Wakefield was an active DXer and until May 
had been an ARRL volunteer examiner Car- 
penter held an Advanced class license. All four 
shooting victims also held FCC General Ra- 
diotelephone licenses. 

All three amateur-licensed victims were ac* 
live in the Los Angeles City Amateur Radio Vol- 
unteers, a club aimed at helping city employees 
become licensed, with an eye toward emergen- 
cy preparedness functions. Hanson said. 

The alleged killer has been charged with four 
counts of murder. TNX ARRL 

Repeater Map Book 

■^ 

Tne new ARRL North American Repeater At* 
las is out. The publication is not to be confused 
with the pocket-sized repeater directory. The 
Atlas features repeater maps for every US state 
and Canadian province, plus Mexico, Central 
America, and the Caribbean. Contact League 
headquarters for pricing and availability. 

Also, the ARRL will produce a handout 
aimed at new hams, explaining the concept of 
band planning. The publication will include a 
listing of ARRL approved plans. TNX Newsline 

ARRL Honors Hams 

The ARRL Board of Directors has honored 
several hams for their contributions to Amateur 
Radio. Dick Jansson WD4FAB has been 
named recipient of the ARRL Technical Merit 
Award for his work on amateur satellites. Philip 
A. Downes N1IFP is the ARRL Professional 
Educator of the Year for 1994, with Charles 
Ward KJ4RV tabbed as the ARRL Professional 
Instructor of the Year for 1994. Chris Townsend 
NU7V won honors as the Herb S, Brier Instruc- 
tor of the Year. Karl Lambert KB40CR won the 
Excellence in Recruiting Award and the Board 
selected Dr. Ulrich L Rohde KA21WEU to re- 
ceive the Technical Excellence Award for his 
series of articles on Key Components of Mod- 
ern Receiver Design, which appeared in the 
May t June. July, and December 1994 issues of 
QST Joseph Phillips K8QOE and Michael Karp 
AF2L are the co-recipients of the Philip J. Mc- 
Gan Silver Antenna Award for 1994 + TNX 
Newsline 

A Winner 

Long Island. New York. Packet sysop Rick 
Lapp KC2PD T who turned 46 on July 18. has 
won his third pentathlon title at the Masters 
U.S.A. Track and Field Championship in East 
Lansing. Michigan, Tne event is for amateur 
athletes 30 years or older. The pentathlon con- 
sists of tfte long jump, discus, javelin, and 200* 
and 1 500- meter runs. His wife Linda is also a 
ham with the callsign N2MUP. Rick is an hon- 
orary member of the Suffolk Police Amateur 
Radio Club. Despite putting in long hours as a 
packet BBS sysop f he somehow finds time to 
compete in regional, national, and international 
U.S.A. and AAU-sanctioned track and field 
events. TNX Newsline 



8 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 





INC. 



AMATEUR CENTER 



HOURS: 

MON. - FRI. 9-5 
SAT. 9-1 PM 

CLOSED 

Sundays & 

Holidays! 



Proud to be "AMERICAS MOST RELIABLE AMATEUR RADIO DEALER" 

Serving Amateur Radio Operators Since 1937 



|F=r 1 




.^^^h. 


_"™ 


■MasterCard] 


IS , 1 


^^m-^r 



182 North Maple - P.O. Box 73 Watertown, SD 57201 



^M 



SALES ORDKK DKSK 1-8 0-927 (4261) 



SERVICK (6051 X86-7314 



FAX (605) 886-344-1 



Teams with 



I \\ Product Info (605) 886 69 14 



KENWOOD 



KENWOOD HF Equipment is TOPS! 



f 




TS-950SDX 

Digital Signal 
Processing 



The HEW KENWOOD T$- 
9505DX (DX-CLUStVE) is 
the talk of tire new gener- 
ation HF transceivers 
Continuous, research, 
development, engineering, 
and production of superior products make Kenwood the recognized leader In Amateur Radio. 
Utilizing the most advanced technology available, our products offer the highest level of qual- 
ity and reliability, The KENWOOD TS-9S0SDX Includes advanced digital signal process- 
ing (D$P) white remaining user- or ion lad- It also includes digital AF VBT, IF notch filter, 
Dual-Mode Noise Blanker/ IF VBT, SSB IF SLOPE luning, selectable IF filter with Memory, 
Swilchable AGO, All-Mode Squelch. High Stability TCXO, GSK or Semi break-in, built-in 
keyer, 100 memories, cw pitch control, adjustable scanning speed, 1 50 watts of power out- 
put built-m speech processor, bin IT- in Computer interface, programmable lone encoder for 
FM mode, and DUAL RECEIVE in a Single band making it the ultimate tor DX. Also avail- 
able is the NEW BM'230 Monitor Scop* ($1019.00}. It also functions as a band scope, 
tone generator, and monitor lor supporting and calibrating radio stations 




TS-850S/AT 

Direct digital Synthesis 

HF Transceiver 

The Kenwood TS-850S fea- 
tures 160-tQ amateur band oper- 
ation with IQOkHZ to 30 MHZ 
General Coverage Receiver. Its 
superior receiver dynamic range (utilizes Direct Digital Synthesizer) with the Kenwood 
NEW AJP SYSTEM (Advanced Intercept Point} provides excellent Intermodulation perfor- 
mance and suppresses unnecessary radiation. Two selective RF amplifiers, one with large 
gain (12DB). are used to enhance sensitivity and another with a small gain (OOB/source 
floor circuit) which improves Inter-modulation characteristics. It also features a IF notch filler, 
tF slope tuning, CW variable pitch control & CW reverse mode. It also has a dual-mode 
noise blanker. 4 step RF attenuator. Swiicftable AGC, All-Mode squelch, micropfocessoroon- 
! rolled auto matte antenna tuner (160-10), GSK, 100 memories, end adjustable power 
Options include DRU-2 Digital Recording Unit. VS~2 voice synthesizer. SO-2 TCXO high 
stability oscillator, and the DSP-100 (Digital Signal Processor), DSP- 1 00 5599.95 




TS-450S/AT 

Compact Mobile 



Kenwood's goal is to always offer our 
customers the most sophisticated 
achievements in technology. So. when 
it came time to enhance our best selling 
TS-440S transceiver we didn't hesitate 
The Kenwood TS-450S includes 
Advanced Intercept Point (AIP) which greatly fm proves the receiver's dynamic range to an 
Incredible 10Bdb. An optional Digital Signal Processor (DSP-100) offers even further 
sound clarity by tailoring the incoming and outgoing audio passband signals, Other refine- 
ments Include convenient spilt frequency operation, advanced fitter (unctions, option* 
at automatic antenna tuner, and tOQ memory channels with flexible scanning selec- 
tions. i\ provides 100 watts of continuous power and DPS (Direct Digital Synthesis) for 
optimum operation. An optional TCXO fSO-2) provides me utmost rn stabilrty. 




TS-50S 

Compact Mobile 

HF TRANSCEIVER 

HF is going places - thanks to 
Kenwood's new TS-50S, the smallest 
transceiver of its kind in the world. 
Providing high-performance communica- 
tions with go- anywhere convenience, the TS-50S Is your passport to freedom. And whether 
used for mobile operations and DX-peditions, or in a fixed Installation, this rig packs a pow- 
erful punch. Maximum output is 100W, and there's a full range of advanced feaiures — 
including 100 memory channels, DDS with innovative "fuzzy" control, and AIP tor superior 
dynamic range IF shift and CW reverse mode help reduce interference, while a noise blanker 
improves clarity, for user-tfiendty operation on The move, there's a multi-tunctlon microphone 
and powerful menu system. And the TS-50S is fuity equipped for split frequency operation. 



ffor all of your %pm/0od 'Communications 'Equipment, Just caHusC 

Wegivel&PlSyWZM,]^ 
We sell Reconditioned and Guaranteed USED EQUIPMENT! 
Call or Write Today for our Catalog / Used Listing! 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



The QRP Delight 

A full-featured antenna tuner with built-in SWR meter. 

by Phil Salas AD5X 



How would you like a lull -fea- 
tured antenna tuner with a built- 
in SWR meter for your QRP sta- 
tion? And rm talking about an instru- 
ment that fits in the palm of your hand 
(sec Photo A), operates even on 160 
meters* works up lo a power level of 
about 10 watts, and has a total cost of 
less than $25! Well, 1 needed something 
like this to complete my compact QRP 
station. The QRP Delight was the result 
of my efforts. The QRP Delight com- 
bines a very effective SWR meter with 
a wide-range antenna tuner, which is 
perfect for matching random wires 
thrown oui of hotel windows. Interest- 
ed? Read on! 

The SWR Meter 

The SWR meter is a variation of a re- 
sistive bridge popularized by the late 
George Grammcr WIDF (circuit shown 
in QRP Notebook by WIFB). This cir- 
cuit has the advantage of providing high 
sensitivity at low power inputs. Its dis- 
advantage is that i he maximum power 
that can be applied to the circuit is lim- 
ited by the power dissipation of the 50- 
ohm bridge resistors because 75'X of 
the transmit power is absorbed by these 



resistors under perfectly matched condi- 
tions. In the original WIDF circuit, the 
two Ik resistors shown in Figure 1 are 
replaced by two 50-ohm resistors; no 
100-ohm resistor is used, and you must 
use a 2P-3T switch for OPERATE, 
CALIBRATE and SWR. In the OPER- 
ATE position the entire SWR circuit is 
bypassed, so there is no metering of rel- 
ative power. In this circuit I use a DPDT 
switch to add in a 100-ohm resistor only 
for SWR readings, allowing the circuit 
to provide a reasonable SWR for your 
transmitter even during severe tune-up 
conditions. Additionally, you have min- 
imum insertion loss in the FORWARD 
position because the Ik bridge resistors 
permit you to always indicate forward 
relative power and calibrate the full- 
scale reading for SWR measurements. 

The Tbner 

The antenna tuner itself is a standard 
T-type tuner utilizing a pair of 335 pF 
miniature transistor radio variable ca- 
pacitors and a toroidal inductor, tapped 
as shown in Figure L To actually make 
the taps, I simply wound the toroid with 
40 turns of #24 wire, and then scraped 
the outer surface of the appropriate turn 



w ith a hobby knife lo clean off the 
enamel insulation. I then tinned each 
wire turn, and tacked soldered tap wires 
to them. 

Construction 

The actual layout of the parts in the 
QRP Delight is a function of the sizes of 
the components you wind up with. Try 
to find the smallest parts you can — es- 
pecially for the DPDT switch, the poten- 
tiometer, and the meter. From Photo B 
you can get a pretty good idea of how 
mine is laid out. I used Radio Shack 
\ .triable capacitors which had no means 
of mounting them to the front panel. To 
mount them, I used a dah of hot glue to 
hold the capacitors in place while I ap- 
plied cpoxy and waited for it lo cure. If 
you use the Mouser variables, you can 
purchase mounting screws for them (see 
the Parts List). I also used hot glue to 
hold the meter in place. To mount the 
inductor on the rotary switch, first bend 
the switch solder tabs out away from the 
center of the switch. Then you can posi- 
tion the inductor tap wires so that they 
easily drop into the solder tabs. Finally, 
use some miniature microphone cable to 
connect the BNC connectors to the 





Photo A. The QRP Delight. 
1 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 



Phow ft The " innards " of the QRP Delight. 




MFJ HF/VHF SWR Analy 



with RF Resistance Meter 

Read your antenna SWR from 1.8-170 MHz . . . 10-digit LCD frequency counter . . . 
/?F Resistance Meter" 1 . . . smooth reduction-drive tuning . . . simple-to-use . . . 



TM 



m .» • * «-»■ * am «m 




For free manual write or call MFJ. 

Take It Anywhere 
The MFJ-259 is fully portable. 



What thf. MF1 ^Q rkvc lower and walch SWR chan S e 

,1 "?i^ ?n - ^^ i latently as vou make each adjust- 

The MFJ-259 gives you a mcnt Vou It know exactly what to 

complete picture of your antenna's do by simpIy watchme m e display. ! "^V^n TW , 

performance anywhere between 1 .8 ^ ne c ^ ical HF ^ abite J^l powered m^rnaliy by^8 AA bat- 
and 170 MHz -- you can even check 
SWR outside the ham bands 
without violating FCC rules. Set 
the bands witch and tune the 



teriesorllOVACwithMFJ-lM2B, 
f^^JSSf^^^J^^ SI2.95. It's in a rugged all metal 



MFJ-259 If you work 

revolutionary new 
SWR Analyzer 1 * 4 is the best invest- 
ment you'll ever make ! Now you 
can diagnose a wide range of 
antenna problems instantly with 
one easy-to-use instrument. 



dial— just like your transceiver. 
SWR is displayed instantly! 

RF Resistance Meter*" 

Does 2; I SWR mean 25 ohms or 
100 Ohms? The new MFJ-259 tells 
you at a glance! 

Now you can measure RF 
resistance up to 500 ohms at 
minimum SWR -- instantly - on 
IVJFJ's exclusive side-by-side RF 
Resistance and SWR Meters f 

Take the guesswork out of 
building matching networks and 
baluns for your antennas. 

Watch the effects of spacing on 
radiation resistance as you adjust 
your antenna. 

Here's What You Can Do . ** 
Find vour antenna's true 



your transceiver to high SWR 

Measure your antennas 2: 1 
SWR bandwidth on a single band, 
or analyze multiband performance 
over the entire spectrum froml .8 to 
170 MHz! 

Measure inductance, 
capacitance, resonant frequency of 
tuned circuits, transmission line 
velocity factor/impedancc/loss.Tesi 
RF chokes, transformers, baluns. 

Adjust your tuner for a perfect 
1 ; I match without creating QRM. 

And this is only the beginning! 
The MFJ-259 is really/our test 
instruments in one: an accurate RF 
signal generator, a high resolution 
170 MHz frequency counter. RF 
Resistance Metewand an SWR 
Analyzer™, 

Free Manual 
MFJ comprehensive 18 page 



. instruction manual is packed with 
resonant frequency tram the shack. asefu| ap p|i cauom „ ^\ explained in 

Tune the antennas on your simple language you can unders! 





1*8-170 MHz SWR Analyzers 

MFJ-249 MFJ-249 HF/VHF 

S 209 M SWR Anal y z€V ~ has aI1 

the features of 
MI J -259 bat less RF resistance 
meter. Includes LS-170 MHz 
continuous coverage, 10-digit 
LCD frequency counter and 
smooth vernier tuning. 

MFJ-209 MFJ-209 HFWHF 
$ 1 A095 SWR Analyzer™ is 

•WtP same as MFJ-259 
without LCD frequency counter 
and RF resistance meter. Has jack 
for external frequency counter 
MFJ-249/MFJ-209 are 4x2 '/2x6V* 
inches and uses 8 AA cells or 1 10 
VAC with MFJ-1312B. $12.95. 



10-160M SWR Analyzer 

MFJ -^07 If vou're an HF man, this 
S7Q95 compact MFJ-207 HF SWR 

* " Analyzer** will help you build 
10- 160 Meters antennas that'll make 
working DX almost routine. 

Just plug in your coax to find the 
SWR of any HF antenna on any ham 
band 10-160 Meters* Has jack for 
external frequency counter. 7Vax2Vax2 ) A 

inches. 

Bandswitch Dip Meier 

MFJ -203 The MFJ " 203 is a 
m ' " ' sensitive Banthwitched Dip 

99 Meter™ that covers all ham 

bands from 160-10 Meters, 

There are no plug-in tuning coils to keep 

up with or break. 

Has detachable coupling coil, dual 

FET oscillator, op-amp meter amplifier 

and jack for external frequency counter. 

7 l /a2 , /»c2V4fiL 



ConryinQ Pouch WHH Wimiowf 




MFJ-29B 

$24 d5 



■■^)\ > 



■ 



Tote vour 
MFJ-259/249/209 
SWR Analyzer™ 
anywhere with 
this custom 
Carrying Pouch. 
Made with a special 
foam-filled fabric, it 
cushions blows, deflects scrapes, and protects 
knobs, meters and displays from harm. 

Clear protective frequency display window 
and cutouts for knobs let you use it without 
taking it out of pouch. Fully-adjustable 
webbed fabric carrying strap has snap hooks on 
both ends. Wear around waist or over shoulder. 
Keep your analyzer safe and looking new! 
MFJ-29. $19,95. no window or cutouts. 




cabinet that's a compact 4x272x67* 
inches. Take it to remote sites, up 
towers, on DX-peditions - any- 
where your antennas are located. 
For rough service, pick up a 
convenient MFJ-29B, $24.95, 
padded carrying pouch to keep your 
MFJ-259 close at hand and looking 
like new. 

How Good is the MFJ-259? 

MFJ SWR Analyzers™ work so 
good, many antenna manufacturers 
use them in their lab and on the 
production line — saving thousands 
of dollars in instrumentation costs! 
Professional installers and 
technicians use them worldwide. 

Get More by Faytiq; Less 

With the MFJ-259, you gel full 
1,8 to 170 MHz coverage, simple 
operation, instantaneous readings, 
a high accuracy frequency counter 
Lind MFJ's exclusive RF Resistance 
Meter"- all for a low $229.95. 



*w 



Dip Meter Adapter 

MFJ-66 Phj fi a di P meler 

1 Q95 coupling coil into your MFJ 
* ' SWR Analyzer** and turn it 
into a sensitive and accurate 
bands witched dip meter. 

With a dip meter you'll 
save time and take the 
guesswork out of winding 
coils, measuring inductance and capacitance, 
measuring velocity factor and electrical lengths 
of coax. Determine resonant frequency of 
tuned circuits and measure Q of coils. Set of 
two coils cover 1.8-170 MHz depending on 
your MFJ SWR Analyzer™. 



Free MFJ Catalog 

Write or call . . . 800-647-1800 ~ 





2 Meter SWR Analyzer ' 

MFJ-20& M FJ-208 2 Meter \ 'HF 
7Q95 SWR Analyzer" finds the 
* ^ SWR of anv antenna from 

138-156 MHz. Jack for external 

uency counter 7 , /2x2 l /:x2 , /4 inches. 

For Commerdal VHF Radio 

Same as MFJ-208 but for 
commercial VHH MFJ-217. $79,95, 
covers 30-50 MHz and MFJ-21& 
$79.95, covers 150- 170 MHz. 

MFJ Antenna Bridge 

MFJ-7Q4R Great tQr detenTuniI1 g 
$7 OSS fesdP ^ resistance of 

#*f antennas and for designing 
impedance matching networks. Measure 
RF resistance up to 500 ohm, Covers all 
ham bands 160-10 Meters. Built-in 
resistance bridge, null meter, tunable 
oscillalor-dnver. frequency counter jack, 
7 l /2x2'/2x2 , /4 inches. Use 9 vol! battery or 
1 10 VAC with MFJ- 1 31 1 SI 2.95. 

CIRCLE 66 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




440 MHz SWR Anatyxmr- 

M F J - ~* 1 9 Read s ^ °f *"? aflte™^ 
SQQ95 420 to 450 MHz -just plug 

™ ™ coax of your antenna into 

SO* 239 connector, set frequency and 

read SWR. Uses microwave 

integrated circuits and microstrip 

technology. Jack for external 

frequency counter. 7V2x2V2x2'/4 in, 

MFJ-2I9N, 599,95, sames as 

MFJ-2 19 hut with "N" connector, 



•J 





MFJ-2 19/2 L 8/2 17/208/207/203 uses 9 volt 
battery or 1 10 VAC with MFJ-1312B, $ 12.95, 

Nearest Dealer/Orders: 800-647-1800 

Technical Help: 8O0-647-TECH(8324) 

• 1 year unconditional guarantee *30 day money back 
guarantee (less s/h) or> orders from MFJ • FREE catalog 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC 
Box 494, Miss. Slate, MS 39762 

(fjOt \ J23-5S69; B^i:3D CSV, Mon.-Fri. 

FAX: (601) 323-6551: Add s/h 

MFJ . , , making quality affordable 

Pnces and speoAcaionssiAject to change G /w mfj Entrtpnsti. in, 





Pi lot i* C. The random wire adapter. 




Photo tt The hack of the QRP Delight, with 
the random wire adapter. 

QRP/luner circuitry. A black permanent 

marking pen and a steady hand provid- 
ed the from panel lettering. 

Random Wire Adapter 

For most applications, 1 use random 
wires Tor an antenna — not a coax- Ted 
antenna. My normal travel antenna is 
made from a 50-foot roll of 24-guage, 
two-conductor stranded speaker wire 
(RS 278-1301). I split the two conduc- 
tors apart and terminated one end of 



IN 




Fwd; 335pf 335 pf 




40T j 
T106-R 




12 Position 

(Radio Shack 



* Two 100 ohm 2 whI.I. resistors in parallel 

** Two 50 ohm 2 watt resistors in series 



Figure L QRP SWR meter and antenna timet: 



PL-259 Shell 



UHF-To-BIMC Adptr 




U II III 



m 



Figure 2. Random wire adapter. 



each wire with a banana plug (RS 274™ 
721) to provide a 100-foot dipole. To 
connect this dipole or any random wires 



to the QRP Delight, I built a random 
wire adapter (sec Photo C) which plugs 
onto the output BNC connector (see 




Photo E. Everything fits in a child's hmch box: 12 V L2 Ah get cell, cables, charger. QRP Delight, home-brew L 
with a microphone and antennas. 



HT-75Q CW/SSB rig 



12 73 Amateur Radio Today * October. 1 995 



Figure 2). This adapter consists of a 
SO-239-to-BNC male adapter (Radio 
Shack 278-120). A standard banana 
plug connects nicely to the SO-239 cen- 
ter conductor For the ground, or coun- 
terpoise wire connection, I soldered a 
short wire terminated with an alligator 
clip to the outside screw-on shell of a 
PL- 259 connector* Then I screwed the 
shell over the adapter. You can probably 
solder the wire/alligator clip directly to 
the adapter; however, I was not sure that 
I wouldn't melt the center dielectric of 
the adapter. 

Conclusion 

I operate QRP with two different rigs: 
a TS^SOS at 10 watts output (OK— not 
really QRP!), and a Tokyo Hy-Power 
HT-750 at 3 watts output. The HT-750 
is the most used since I can put a com- 
plete station in a child's plastic lunch- 
box (donated by my daughter — see Pho- 
to E), making it convenient for my busi- 
ness trips. 

And how does the QRP Delight 
work? Great! I seem to be able to match 
anything I want to with it — even on 160 
meters! I normally operate with the 
dipole described earlier, with each end 



Parts List 



1 



3^15/16' x 2-1/16' X 1-5/8" plastic box 



2 335 pF variable capacitors 

24TR218 w/two 48SS003 mtg screws 



Radio Shack 220-231 

Radio Shack 272*1337 or Mouser 

Radio Shack 275-1385 
Radio Shack 275-614 
Amidori Associates 



Radio Shack 278-105 

Hosfelt Electronics, Mariin P. Jones 

& Associates, etc. 



1 One-pole 12-position rotary switch 

1 DPDT toggle switch 

1 T130-6 {yellow core) toroid 

2 feet #24 enameled wire 
2 BNC chassis mount jacks 

1 1 00 ^iA miniature meter 

2 1 k-ohm 1 M -watt resistors 
2 51 -ohm 2-watt resistors 

2 100-ohm 2-watt resistors 

1 10k resistor 

1 1 0k miniature potentiometer 

1 1 N34A germanium diode 

Miniature microphone cable (Radio Shack 278-752} or RG-174 coax 

Note: Radio Shack no longer shows the variable capacitors in their catalog but some stores 
still have them in slock. The Mouser variable capacitor has two 266 pF sections, Just use 
one section of each variable capacitor for this application. 



of the dipole dangling from opposite 
sides of a hotel window. If my hotel 
room has a large floor-mounted air con* 
ditioner unit in it, I only dangle a single 
wire from the window and clip the alli- 
gator clip on the random wire adapter to 
the air conditioner. I have never used 



the QRP Delight above the 1 0-watt lev- 
el due to the power resistor dissipation 
limits and the undoubtably low break- 
down voltage rating of the variable 
capacitors. Build up a QRP Delight for 
the ultimate in low power size and flexi^ 
bility. 






THE MINI STATION 

The MINI STATION is a very compact and portable 2 
Amp~Hour gel cell battery that wilt power your HT via 
your cigarene power cord at 5 Watts tor days on end, it 
can even power a mobile rig for a few days or so 
(depending on how long winded you are). It's great for 
those situations when you need more talk power and 
longer battery life, The MINI STATiON is also a 
fantastic power source for cellular phones, laptop 
computers, or anything that plugs into a car's cigarette 
lighter. We even used a customer's one million candle- 
power Q-BEAM spot light as a demo at the 95 Dayton 
Hamfest 



The MINI STATION is a very similar to a QUANTUM battery; except theirs costs 
about $200.00 with its special adapters. The MINI STATION utilizes your HTs 
cigarette powef cord. In addition to a waif charger, rt comes complete with a handy 
carrying pouch that has a removable shoulder strap. The pouch also has a belt strap 
that buckles, so you donl need to unfasten your belt to wear it. 

The MINI STATION also has 2 LED's for indicating when the battery is switched on, 
running low on power, or has finished charging. Since the MINI STATION is a gel 
cell, it does not suffer from memory effect, so you don't need to wait until the batteiy 
is dead before you charge it. That means you can use it all week and then charge rt t 
or use it everyday and charge it everyday so that it's always fully charged, It can be 
charged thousands of times with the supplied charger, for years of enjoyment. It 
automatially stops charging when its voltage sensing circuitry detects il is fully 
charged, Other brands have timed charging circuits (or no charging shutoff at all) 
whtch can damage their battery or not fully charge it! 




The MINI STATION weights less than 2 pounds and is 
approximately T" x 3*x 6*. 



Serving the LORD 
Smce 1987 




To order, send check or money 
order for $79.95 + $6.50 to: 

THE HAM CONTACT 

P.O. Box 3624, Dept. MS 
Long Beach, CA 90803 
for information call (310) 433-5860 
COD Orders call {800) 933-HAM4 
(800) 933-4264 




CIRCLE 384 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 13 



on your Feedback card 



DDS Dream VFO 



Yes, you can build your own synthesizer! 



by Steven Weber KD1 JV 



At last, here ii is. The VFO 
QRPers and home-brewers have 
been dreaming of — a compact, 
standalone. Direct Digital Frequency 
Synthesizer VFO with LCD readout and 
push-button operation (see Photo A). 
Finally, your QRP rig wiih the frequen- 
cy accuracy, stability, and features of 
\our "BIG RIG." Before you wake up. 
take a look at these features: 
• 0.0 to 25.000,000 MHz operation us- 

ing Analog Devices' new AD700S 

DDS chip 
■ Thirty character (16x2) liquid crystal 

display, back lighted 



• Push-button control 

• Frequency steps of 10 Hz, 100 Hz, and 
5 kHz 

■ Direct frequency entry mode ... to 1 
Hertz 

• Preprogrammed QRP frequencies for 
80, 40, 30. and 20 M 

• Ten user memories (stored in 

EEPROM) 

• A/B MEMO memory 

• Programmable receiver local oscillator 
with RIT 

• Ten- to 30-WPM paddle keyer 
(2-wpm increments) 

• Decodes and displays your outgoing 




Photo A. The DDS Dream VFO, 



Morse code 
• FSK keying mode possible 
Compact (4" X 4" X T module} 

Operation 

It will only take a few minutes to 
learn how to use all the functions or this 
unit. Most operations involve pushing 
only one button. Storing or recalling a 
user memory takes two buttons. DFE 
(Direct Frequency Entry) lakes up to 10 
pushes of the buttons. 

Programmable Offset Frequency 

An offset frequency can be pro- 
grammed to be used as a receiver local 
oscillator or for FSK keying. This offset 
is automatically added (or subtracted if 
the result is over 25 MH/) to the cur- 
rently displayed (operating* frequency 
while in the receive mode (T/R line 
high). The offset can be any frequency 
up lo 25 MHz, With the T/R line low, 
the output frequency is that which is 
displayed on the LCD. 

For FSK operation, program the offset 
to the frequency shift needed. The T/R 
line is used to shift the output frequency. 
Since the offset is normally added to the 
transmit frequency, a high on the T/R 
input is the high frequency and a low is 
the low frequency. The FSK keying rate 
is limited only by the switching speed of 
the optoisolator. In this mode, the unit 
can only be used as an exciter 

Built-in Keyer! 

The Paddle works automatically. As 
you skirt to key. the frequency output of 
the synthesizer shifts from receive to 

transmit and then keys your transmitter. 

The Morse you key in will be decoded 
and displayed in the first eight places on 



1 4 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 




lr^ 



4> 0*5** 



+> OQT 






BCD 



S£L£G1 



0.0 TO 25.0 Mhz 

DIRECT DIGITAL 
SYNTHESIZER 

kduv Piom 



Figure I. Direci Digital Synthesizer schematic. 



the bottom line of the LCD, The VFO 
frequency will shift back lo receive af- 
ter a word space is delected, and the 
(Morse) display will clear after three 
word spaces. 

I'll skip giving a detailed description 
of how all the buttons work. Operation, 
programming, expanded construction 
details, and mechanical drawings are 
supplied along with the programmed 
CPU chip. 

Still dreaming? Lets find out more 
about this great new DDS chip from 
Analog Devices, 

How It Works 

Analog Devices really outdid them- 
selves with this one. Completely inte- 
grated, enter 32- bit binary frequency 
data serially or with a 16-bit parallel da- 
ta bus and get a sine wave of the desired 
frequency out of it. The chip includes a 
1 0-bit DAC. It also includes two fre- 
quency registers that you can use to 
shift the output frequency in one clock 
period. To top it all off, the chip also in- 
cludes two modulation registers that 
you can use to modulate directly AM or 
FM (phase) the output. Although the se- 
rial port can be used to load these regis- 
ters, best performance (modulation rates 
up lo 16.5 MHz) is obtained using the 
parallel data inputs. Put this chip on a 
card for your PC, modulate with digi- 
tized speech from Sound Blaster, and 
look out. 

Because of the integrated 10-bit 



DAC, the spectral output of this chip is 
outstanding. Frequency spurs are typi- 
cally 60 to 70 dBm down from the fun- 
damental, and all arc down at least 50 
dBm. The signal output level is set lo 1 
V p-p. A simple 5-poIe low -pass filter 
helps take the edges off of the stepped 
sine wave produced by the DAC. Be- 



cause of the 0. 1 jiF cap used 

10 couple the chips* output 
to the filter, the lowest audio 
frequency out into a 10k 
load is about 1000 cycles. 

The frequency accuracy 
and stability of the output is 
solely determined by the 
DDS clock. The clock I used 
is CMOS and has a rated 
.005% frequency tolerance 
and a 100 ppm/C tempo. 
Typically, these parts per- 
form much belter than their 
specs imply. Frequency error 
and drift will be most no- 
ticeable at high frequencies. 
Below 10 MHz, drift and er- 
ror will be almost nonexis- 
tent. 

At a 50-MHz clock rate, 
this chip is fairly power hun- 
gry, drawing about 125 mA. 

11 ts also very expensive. 
Expect to pay about $60 for 
one. 

A single-chip DDS de- 
serves to be controlled by a 
single-chip MPU. I choose the 87C51 as 
it is readily available and easy to use. 

A 93C46 serial EEPROM is used to 
store the frequency data. This little 
eight-pin dip can be written to at least 
100,000 times and remember data for 
40 years. 

The "row" switches on the keypad are 



\D 



u 



n 



o 



o 




- KDUV DESIGNS 
s, 25 MHZ DDS 

CD 

CO 

DOT 
n DASH 



OTVR 
KYR QUI 



< 




3s 




^ 



fO Mi 



B7C5I U? 



HfiNi) 



ua 



CHS 
en 



+ 



"d 




sen 



K> 



o 



b 




CL8 







[ 1 OJ ^^^^— ^^^^— 

'U — + Os £ 







x 



74HCT42 






58 mi * 



a 



c- 



smrn bd*j«d 



Figure 2, The main board, component screen. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 15 




Photo B, The main hoard, 



Photo C Display and switch hoard. tn(>iuiwd to main hoard. 



connected to port 3 of the MPU. The 
"columns" are scanned by using a 
74HC42 binary- to-decimal decoder. This 
saves a few I/O lines. 

Three outputs from pon 2 contain 
band select information in BCD for au- 
tomatically selecting a proper xmit or 
rev filter on your rig for the current op- 
erating frequency. 

The LCD data lines are connected to 
port of the MPU. Enable (write) and 
P/D (program / data) control come from 
port 2. The display has 0,2-inch charac- 
ters and is back- lighted LED. The back- 
lighting comes at a premium, but it is 
well worth the exira expense. 

All inputs and outputs (except hamb 
go through optoisolators. This ensures 
thai >ou won't blow an input and have to 
replace the MPU for big bucks, and 
keeps RFI down to a minimum. 

Power is supplied hy a 7805 regulator, 
and a LM317L is configured as a con- 
stant current source to power the LEDs 
back-lighting the LCD, 

Construction 

The VFO is as easy to build as it is to 
operate. Experienced builders will have 
it up and running in less than an hour It 
is best to build it on two printed circuit 
boards. See Figures 1-5. 

Because the boards are sinsie sided, 
there are a few wire jumpers to be in- 
stalled. The only thing unusual is thai 
one resistor and several caps 
(RS.C8.9.I0.1 1 1 are installed on the sol- 
der side of the PC board, This was the 
only practical place to locate them and 



provide effective decoupling of the 
AD7008's supply leads. The AD7008. 
87C5 1 and 93C46 are socketed. SIP pins 
and sockets are used to connect the LCD 
to the main board. The SIP pins mount 
with the long pins sticking out of the 
bottom (etch side) of the main board. 
The SIP socket is mounted on the bot- 
tom (component) side of the display. 

The switchboard connects to the main 
board with a short length of ribbon cable 
(see Photos B and C). The display and 
switchboard mount over the solder side 
of the main board. 

Threaded spacers support the display 
to the main board. Additional spacers 
mount the switchboard to the main board 
and to the enclosure. If a receiver is to 
he located in the same box as the VFO, 
mount a metal shield over the assembly. 

The completed module is designed to 
mount into a 7" X 5" X 2.5" sloping pan- 
el metal box* Although other enclosures 
are possible of course, the sloping box 
makes it easy to read the display and 
push the tuning buttons. 

A Couple of Warnings 

Most all of the ICs are susceptible to 
ESD damage (electrostatic discharge). 
Make sure your work space is static- 
free; that is, wear only cotton clothes, 
avoid working on a nylon nig. and occa- 
sionally touch an earth-grounded metal 
object. 

Second, the quickest way to destroy a 
CMOS IC is to power it up backwards. 
Make darn sure the chips are installed 
the right way before applying power. Al- 



so, once the DDS chip is pushed into its 
socket, a special tool is required to re- 
move it (available at Radio Shack, 
thankfully). So try to gel it right the first 
time! 

Power up and Test 

Once you are sure all the parts are 
installed correctly and have inspected 
for solder shorts or opens (especially 

around the plcc socket), it's time to *Tirc 
'er up," You will need a 9-12 Volt O 
200 mA supply. The only adjustment is 
for LCD contrast. After power is ap- 
plied, simply adjust the control for the 
best readability of the display. Ground 
the T/R input. In the transmit mode, the 
output frequency should be exactly the 
same as that which is displa>ed on the 
LCD. The VFO powers up set to 40 me- 
ters. The display should read "A 
7.040,000 MHz" on the lop line. The 
keycr speed "20" will be in the lower 
left corner You should be able to hear 
this frequency on your station receiver 
or read it on a frequency counter. Now 
check out all the functions to 
ensure that they all work. Then program 
an offset frequency. All zeros will 
negate the effect of the T/R input. Con- 
nect the VFO up to your QRP rig and 
have fun! 

If you have any problems getting the 
unit to work, suspect solder shorts. In- 
spect the board with a magnifying glass 
to be sure. Cracks in the copper PC 
tracks can also cause all kinds of weird 
problems, 

Continued on page !ti 



16 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 996 



Feedback 



In our continuing effort to present the 
best in amateur radio features and 

columns, we recognize the need to go 
directly to the source — you, the reader, 
Articles and columns are assigned feed- 
back numbers, which appear on each 
article/column and are also listed here. 
Please rate each feature or column as 
"Great," *OK, # or *No Way/ Mail your 
responses to: 73 Magazine Feedback, 
70 Route 202N, Peterborough, New 
Hampshire 03458. 

1 Never Say Die 

2 Letters 

3 QRX 

4 The QRP Delight 

5 DDS Dream VFO 

6 Portable Solar Electric 
Power Generator 

7 Armstrong Updated 

8 Link it All! 

9 Boring Beacons! 

10 Senior Citizens Upgrade 

11 QRP Mini-Tuner 

12 The Ramsey Electronics SX-20 
QRP SSB/CW 20m Transceiver 

13 The Maggiore Hi Pro R1 Repeater 

14 Carrs Comer 

15 Ask Kaboom 

16 Hamsats 

17 RTTYLoop 

18 QRP 

t9 Homing In 

20 Hams with Class 

21 Above and Beyond 

22 Ham to Ham 

23 Ham Help 

24 Propagation 

25 Barter 'n' Buy 

26 Special Events 

27 New Products 




mmum , _ _ 

Specializing in Custom 
Electronic Products 



CftCKET PULSES Jsr Caxrafed, VareOfe 
Dit, Cycfe 33Pcn Tunrg ra tnj n er*- PosthE arc 
imp*** K^ng Grcut GcT^sEivcy 30DVffi«. 

supptad Duel comcteAase 3* <ey Dm. 

hanJmar 



-IStntinn Tuning 
^Invcrurnwit 



Tatar* SO 333A 



4:1 H^*, 

Sour*. 5 so 50 Wit 3 *w ^ 



and YACJ 



* 'BigBerth»-S«f*i-1CKWAE3Scbs& 
□Msni ctoke tniurti TTCarTi. H^ Pawe- sups. 

ANT1WNA 5 YSTEMSf TCxrtsBam WJft kadaBrs. 

VWe Tarmiwionil 

* 11 Oipott Bilun 130 ur 30/ 4Q or 3C/ 
17/12 or 30/1 5/lD(m] - *a5*» 

* Caudal Cantor SuppQita ligh pewor 
appitaLiniift, FttrunlpBG hardware, SO-239A Teflon 
cofirBCJon, EUBfaom KKinganrB avHibb* —"19" 

Syatflms with Coaxial Carnal- Support; 1 SO or BD/ 
40 or 30/1 7/ 12 W 20/15/ ID [m] - 3 49 m 




CEIUTAUfl 

BALUN 
PRODUCTS 

Exctjp-Lic: i.il 

Quality 

P**ttyfin 

PisrfnrmijnCB 



LIFETIME 



HIGH QUALITY WIRE PRODUCTS iCa-npesitwe Prices. Call for Qunt*) 

* MH3-17 DOWt, racinga 10 10kW « P*e-ta& wre/ionnBcear 

camtwiatione • Genrargi and special ana*. ■ LBddB 1 line ■ apacwl 
□retire • 1-kwwy duty rcftr cable, 13 corKJuctor) 

Curtain Buftt High P opwt Antenna Switching Systtma - call lor QUOCS 

CENTAUR ELECTRONICS 

3720 S. Pww Aw . S5&5 

Tuxcw, AZ B5713 

t5SO] 622-6672 * FAX (520j 622 1341 



vha 



Slow Scan TV 

doesn't have eo be expensive anymore! 




Every day more hams arc enhmncing iheir communiution by using 
imagei, Join the fan and jtt wJiM^auvcrxcnitiittutg. 



Qiwlitj Color SSTV is cosy and ■ffbnUbk with 



TV. S2J9.95 



Requires IBM PC-rampoJUblOBftmljelWTH'l I. I McBibyte or memory, colof VGA 
tfispifty. MS-DOS, Shipyin^ J5 W U.S.A. tod Camld*. J 15 fur rthen Wiiic or call for 

Absolute Value Systems 
1 1 5 Stedman St * 7 
Chelmsford, MAQ1B24-1B23 
[508)256 6907 
e-mail: johnl@worid*ttd>c:om 



CIRCLE 351 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



R-390/URR RECEIVER 




Collins-designed receiver covers 0.5 to 32 MHz 
AM-CW in 3t one MHz b ands read on 5-digit 
mechanical counter. Band widths 2-4-8-16 KH- 
plus A6C, BF0, Line & Carrier Level meters: uses 
33 tubes, Includes 12 spare tubes (1 each type) 
& operators manual. 10.5x19x1 6 A 95 lbs sh. 

G0V7-0VERHAULED $525 + 00; SERVICE 

MANUAL, partial reproduction $15 JO 

S-METER for Collins KWM-2A, Unused... $29. 95 

6146WTU8E, JAN-box GE $19.95 ea; 

1fl/$175J0 

Prices FOB. Lima, 0.- VISA. MASTERCARD, DISCOVER 

Allow far Shipping * Wrile lor latest Calatog 

MrJress0epr.73 • Ph an* 419^7*6573 • Fa* 419/2274313 



FAIR RADIO SALES 

1016 E. EUREKA • Box 11D5 • LIMA. OHIO • 45S02 



CIRCLE 75 ON READER SOWCE CARD 



SMART BATTERY CONTROLLERS 
FOR LEAD ACID OR GELL-CELLS 



6 TO 2BV. 1 1CVZ20 VAC. 50*0 HZ 
CQNTm/UOUS CHAFGB UC39Q6 I C 
FTC RJSE SVSITO¥«LE CURR&4T. 
REVCRSf BATTERY PROTECTtQN 
TRJCtO£ START. 06C SD£DPCa. 
SCREW TERMT4ALS i MANLW- 
PURO-V^SE BASJC U*T Off COMPLETE WT Vtf WCTEH. LOVOLT 
Cfm ON TRANSFORMER & ENCL.OSLJRE 

JOT: BC-COfffL-Oa FOftBV 1 AMP MAX Si 26 95 

S12S9& 
J1 39 6& 

S M95 
$ G4 95 

S 16 95 
$ IB GC 




BC-CONTL.-12 12 0Rt4V 1 AMP MAX 
flCNCCNTL^a 24 0R2SV U3 AMP MAX.,. 



flJLSf C COHTTiOLLBfr. 6 TO UV. 1 AMP MAX 

£4 Tv *a» 1/2 AWT ......._... 

opnoivs: transformer kit ..„_ 

AUTO LOW VOLT Df SCOM4ECT WALARM OUTPUT,.... 
SOLAR CQft Tgru i ea DUAL LEVEL VOLT CONTROL 
SC-CONTL-aOjWLO-VOLT* ENCLOSURE) 

SC-BASIC-OO BASIC SOLAR CONTROLLER „ 

8CJM. COMPLETE 5 AMP CONTROLLER 



CLRTISKEYERKIT 



,| S4 as 
119995 



INCLUDES AUCXO AMPLIFIER, IAMBIC KEYING, ADJUSTABLE 

SPEED CONTROL S 39.05. SPEED METER,.. ,S 10 00 

FOS/NEG KEYING, TONE-WEIGHT CONTROL j 10.00 



JfARCOW SOU - 



ANTENNAS 



f 37.95, 160 M 



S-U95 
S 42 95 



:12M SM 220 440 MHEJ 110.95 

usa a-*p co$t ib n «si t*d>» t> »^6a Ann itod 

t-800OAD£ PRO (523-377SJ FAX 503-329-4499 

vi Sfc Wk5*1^?Ci l #t> OCOK Oft W O f^WCES 4 ^£C 3jGl£C* ro o-^wge 

JAXJf PRODUCTS, fNC E, HAMPSTEAO NH 03S2S-05W 



Field Strength Meters 



Commercial, Industrial, OEM, 
EMI Test, RF Labs, R&D, 
Medical & 



Features: 

• DC to 12 GHz 

• External Antenna Option 

• Great Sensitivity 

• Low Battery Indicator 

• Calibration Curves 

• Ultra Low Current Drain 

$229-°° OUR BEST MODEL 




IHCf FIELD Fiera StfUfigtti ,U 



prp 



Mare Than twice the Bandwidth at 112 the price! 



To order call - (800) FIELD 58 (343-5358) 

I.C. Engineering _ 

1B350 Ventura Blvd., Suite 125, Encino, CA 91436 ^ 

818-345-1692 3K 

818-345-0517 Fax 



CIRCLE 293 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



UHF VIDEO 
TRANSMITTER 

Miniature 200 Mw 

pep, Vfc^ Transmitter 

Suit tough- Housed in 

a black anoefzed 

mWed duminum case 

with stainless steel SMA 

antenna connector 

& saews, 

AvaJable either at 

434 mhz or 42325 mftz 

Using SAW R^onator technotogy 

S279 plLE s/h S5 
Check , Money Order. Visa or Mastercard 

CA Res. add e.25% tax 




TECHNICAL 



ModLiaton type: AM. 

Vdlage: I2vdc-I00roo 

Rf.OipUi 2D0mwPEP 

Ffequendet 434 Mhz, 42325 Mv 

SpecfywtertQideirig tci f oiq 021^770 

4?mmU34^fT¥nWx ISmmH FAX: 3 1 82 1 -OOW 



A.LG., INC 

P.O. Box 642067 

Los Angeles, CA 
90064-3057 




HamCall™ CD-ROM 

I s& !;■'■■ rT]LUion.-d CatK^n Lookup 
Over 1,1dG rjTJG listings araj 113 Countries 

Now includes new FCC data for mat containing 
U S clubs, military stations, reciprocal 
calls. 687.000 U S amateurs, and 
392,000 International ca\'z 
CALL DOS & window* programs took up 
name, address, exptratiori date, birth 
date, license das*, county, lallong *re« 
code, time zone gnd square, previous 
cat and class, Mest FCC transaelion 
Retneve by any data etement inducing county on PC. call 
sjgrv on MAC Hundreds of new shareware programs are on 
Ihts disc. For a larger software cotection see ad below 

• No hard disk required * Print Labels ■ Export to hard disk 
or floppy ■ TSR runs from text window, now display* county 

* Updated every Apn) & Oct - Standing orders accepted • 
Dealer discount on 25 or more ■ Latest public domain PC 
software Pnce remains $50.00 plus shipping. S5 00 U S , 
$10 00 Internati onal 

Ue«ty Updaied CT^oU 

Electronics Software Compendium tm 

The Electronics Software Compendium 
is a collection or shareware programs and 
data files that pertain to electronics, broad- 
casting, amateur radio and SWl activity, 
Over 25.000 Hies In total. The disc is updaied and issued 
annually in April Over 300 megabytes of PC and 50 MB Tor 
MAC. Send for your new edition today 1 The price is still only 
$25.0X3 plus shipping, $5 00 U £.. $10 00 International 

F3UCK MASTER 

Route* Bon 1630 Mineral VA 25117 
540894-5777 - 800282 5638 
543.e34-&141[FiX} 
^lnt^net^nfogbuck_co^^^_ 

CIRCLE 56 OH READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 1 7 



-4 






"tlf 



-.1. ~ 



o 



m 



Tr> our 
cull Mpi tervtr 
v,w\\ Ihj3w con\ 



» 




Figure 3. The main board, copper side. 



DDS Dream VFO 

Continued from page 16 

Getting the parts* 

Except for the DDS chip, all the parts 
are available from a combination of JDR 
Micro Devices, Digi-Key, and Mouser I 
used Newark Electronics for the 
AD7008. They will ship COD. I can 
supply a programmed 87C51, the drilled 
and etched PC boards, as well as de- 
tailed operating and construction in- 
structions for $50.00 pp. For a mere 
$225. 00, get a complete kit with drilled 
and painted box. [Box 140, Gorham NH 
03581] 

Conclusion 

Having all the controls for my rig on 
the desk next to my paddle has been an 
operating dream. Hope I never wake up. 
By the way, I'm developing a compan- 
ion four-band. 5-watt transmitter and 
general coverage receiver (AM and 
CW). 




Figure 4. The switchboard, component screen. 



n b a d 

/\ D B D 



• 



4 

'< 



IBB ft B 

p p e l p 

B B fl B 

I ^ B t/n 

B B B B 




v s 



jTlAAA 



Figure 5. The switchboard, copper side. 







Parts List 


U1 


7805 


5-volt regulator 


U2 


LM317L 


T0-92 adjustable voltage regular 


IB 


AO70O6JP50 


CMOS DDS MODULATOR 


U4 


SG-S1KH50.0000 


EPSON 50 MHz CMOS ciOCK 


U5 


93C46 


1K serial EEPROM 


U6 


74HCT42 


bed to decimal decoder 


U7 


87C51 


4K MPU [must be programmed) 


U8 


551-PS25Q1-4 


Quad OptoisoJator (MOUSER) 


LCD 


509-GMD1620ALY (MOUSER) 


D1 


1 N4001 


1-amp ractifJflr 


C1-3 


4.7jiF/10V 


Tantalum cap 


C4-U 


0.1 uF 


Ceramic mono cap .1" LS 


C15 


2.2 \iff25 V 


Aluminum electro lytic radial 


C16.17 


22 pF 


ceramic disk 


C18 T 20 


120 pF 


ceramic disk, NPO 


C19 


220 pF 


ceramic disk, NPO 


R1^* 


150 ohm 


ail resistors, 1/4-W, 5% 


R5 


47 ohm 


Cartjon film 


R6 


390 ohm 




R7 


51 ohm 




R8 


100Kohm 




R9 


10K 


trimmer potentjomeier Bourns 
3316F series 


L1.2 


0.39 jiH 


mdded miniature choke 


SIP pins 






SIP sockel 


| 




Printed circuit boards 




20 Push-button switches 


E-SWtTCH, 520 series EG1411 


Xt 12 MHz crystal HC-49/US 


case 



18 73 Amateur Radio Today* October; 1995 






HAM 






National Talk Radio Show With Len Winkler, KB7LPW 

America's Only 

Ham Radio 
Show On The 






Sundays 

6:00 pm EST 

Weekly Co-Hosts, John Moore, NJ7E and Ned Steams, AA7A Weekly DX Update With Lee Finkel, KY7M 

Tune in each week for national ham radio news, FCC news, weekly guests from 
the amateur radio community, ham trivia contests, prizes, listener call-in and morel 

Sponsored in part by 13 Amateur Radio Today. 









Ham Radio 


& More Affilliates 




AH: 


KNWA1600 


BELLEFONTE 






WTJl 1310 


MA0ISONVHJ.E 


WM- 


Iwn tflRJ 


CLOV1S 




KELD 1400 


ELDORADO 




LA: 


KGGM 93 SFM MONROE 


OH 


WQ\ 1010 


CHARLEST0WHUNT1KGTOWNEW 


A2: 


KFNN 1510 


PHOENIX 






KEEL 710 


SHREVEPOFTT 50.000 WATTS<! 






BOSTON 




KVHD 1600 


PHESCOTT 




MA: 


WNBH 1340 


NEW BEDFORD/PROVIDENCE 


(K; 


KTMC 1400 


MCALESTER 




KVNA 600 


FLAGSTAFF 






BOSTON CABLE CHANNEL 38B 




KADS 1240 


OKLAHOMA CITY 


CA: 


KNSN \29Q 


CHICO/REDDING 




Ml: 


WMKT 1270 


TRAVERSE CITYyCADILLAC 


OR: 


IffiNP 1410 


PORTLAND 


CT: 


WATR 1320 


HARTFORD 






WABJ 1490 


ADRIANfTQLEDO 


PA 


WJMW 550 


SCRANTOWWILKES-8ARRE 


FL 


WFFG 1300 


MIAMI/KEYS 




MO: 


WBGZ 1570 


ST LOUIS 


SC: 


WPCC 1410 


CLINTON 




wipc tag 


TAMPA/ST.PETERSBURG 




KSLQ 1350 


WASHINGTON 




WJMX 970 


MYRTLE BEACH/FLORENCE 


GA: 


WGEG 1440 


BRUNSWICK 






KNWA 1600 


SPRINGFIELD 




WDAR 1350 


DARLINGTON 


IL: 


WKTA 1330 


CHICAGO 






KSWM 940 


AURORA 


TN: 


WRWB 740 


KNOXVILLE 




WBGZ 1570 


ALTON 




MS: 


WSUH 1420 


MEMPHIS, TN./OXFORD, MS 


TX: 


KIVY 1290 


CROCKETT/PADOfNGTON 




WTIM 1410 


TAYLORVILLE/SPRINGR 


MT: 


KDRG MQ0 


BUTTE/DEER/LODGE 


UT; 


K26EM 


CHANNEL 26 TV EMERY 




WKEl 1450 


KEWANEE 




m 


WSKY 1230 


GREENVILLE-'SPARTENBURG 






COLJ NTR V/C ASTELEDALE 


IN: 


WPOJ 1300 


HUNTINGTON 






WEEB 990 


FAYETTEEVILLE 


VT: 


WSYS 1390 


RUTLAND 


10: 


WKEl 1450 


DAVENPORT 






WCRY 1460 


RALEIGH 


Wl 


WHBY 1150 


GREEN BAY/APPELTON 


10. 


WKEJ 1550 


W1CHITA/WINFIELD 






WHKY 1290 


HICKORY 


WV; 


WWNR 620 


BLUEFIELD'BECKLEY 


KY: 


WMTA1380 


CENTRAL CITY 




NE 


KICS 1550 


UNCOLWHASTINGS 




WNMR1G3 9FM WHEEUNGNEW MARTINS 




Ham Radio & More is also available on Satellite! 
Spacenet 3, Transponder 9, 6.8 Audio for Home Dish (Analog). 

Find out what radio station airs "Ham Radio & More" in your local area 
by calling the originating station, KFNN, at 602-241-1510. 
For sponsorship information contact Ron Cohen at 602-241-0482 



Number 6 on your Feedback card 



Portable Solar Electric 

Power Generator 



by Everett James K4SYU 



Have you ever had the urge to 
get on the air and operate 
without having to plug the rig 
into a commercial, mechanical, or bat- 
tery electrical power source? Well, if 
you would like to go this route for 
fun, or tor Field Day, Lhen try direct 
solar electric power Here in sunny 
Florida, direct electric solar power 



works like a charm most of the time. 
And when it rains, who wants to be 
outside? 

I built this solar power setup about 
two years ago and have used it many 
times at Ballard Park in Melbourne, 
Florida, and in my back yard in Satel- 
lite Beach. The solar panel has been 
used for battery-charging purposes. It 




Photo A. The author with solar panel and HW-8 transceiver Note the handle and the from 
cover on the jmnei 

20 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



has also been used to power my 
Heathkit HW-8 QRP Transceiver di- 
rectly without a battery, and has pro- 
vided electric power Tor many suc- 
cessful QSOs, 

Alter I have described how this pan- 
el is built, maybe you would like to 
mount your solar panel in a similar 
fashion. The design goals that I tried 
to achieve with this project were 
portability, protection from breakage, 
and ease of operation. This solar panel 
was manufactured by Chronar Corp.* 
PXX Box 177. Princeton, NJ 08542, 
The specifications stale that it is a 



% • • if you plan to use it 
in a portable manner only in 

fair weather, as I do, 

then make a wooden frame 

as I have done. * $ 



solar amorphous glass panel with an 
output of 14*5 volts in full sun at 750 
niA (500 niA is guaranteed). The si/e 
of the panel is ]' x 3" x 0. 125". I pur- 
chased it at a local HamfesL My elec- 
trical measurements indicate about 20 
volts output with no load. The voltage 
is about 14.5 to 15 volts with a load of 
about 650 mA. 

The panel, when purchased, was 
like a large pane of glass and just as 
fragile. Simply getting it home with- 
out breaking it was quite a chore. The 
vendor furnished a set of instructions. 
a small amount of solder, and two 
metal pigtails. Soldering the tinned 
copper pigtails to the panel was quite 
difficult. There were instructions for 
soldering, hut the process is quite frus- 



trating. My suggestion is to use a 
small electric soldering iron and sort 
of tin or puddle the solder on each of 
the edge plated strips at the top and 
bottom of the rear of the panel on one 
end. When you have a nice little pud- 
dle of solder built up on the plated 
strip, introduce the pigtail and solder 
it to the solder puddle. Set the panel in 
full sunlight and check die continuity 
by using a 10- watt, 25-ohm load. You 
should be able to measure approxi- 
mately 14.5 volts and the resistor will 
get quite warm. If this checks out 
okay, then put a little epoxy over each 
of the solder connections in order to 
make a stronger mechanical bond. If 
you plan to leave the panel out in the 
weather, it is necessary to make a 
frame that is weather tight, using elec- 
trical-grade silicone sealant on the 
back with a Plexiglas rear cover, like 
a sandwich, But if you plan to use it 
in a portable manner only in fair 
weather, as I do, then make a wooden 
frame as I have done. 

I used oak in constructing the 
frame, but pine would have been ac- 
ceptable. The top and bottom rails and 
the crosspieces are 1.5" x .75". There 
are crosspieces at the center and at 
both ends. The area between the 
crosspieces is covered with ordinary 
1/4" plywood on the back. I cut a 
3/16" x 3/16" groove along one edge 
of the top and bottom frames. This 
groove is what holds the solar panel 
within the frame. The groove should 
be large enough to allow the solar 
panel to be slid in from the end, but 
should hold it securely. A little move- 
ment is okay as this allowed for ex- 
pansion of the glass as the panel gets 
quite warm out in the sun. The wood- 
en crosspieces are bolted to the top 
and bottom rails using 1/4-20 carriage 
bolts with nuts and washers on the 
back. The length of the top and bot- 
tom rails is 3 feet, which is the same 
length as the solar panel. All that is 
needed to keep the panel from sliding 
out of the groove in the rails is a 
wooden 1-1/4 by 1/4 wooden slat fas- 
tened on each end by wood screws 
that tie it to the end crosspieces. A 
carrying handle is attached to the top 
rail by wood screws. The output ter- 
minals, the voltage regulator, and the 
diode are attached to the right-hand 
end of the top rail, A heat sink is used 
with the voltage regulator and the 
wires to the panel go under the right- 
hand end slat and attach to the pig- 
tails. A plywood front cover is mount- 
ed by two hinges to the bottom rail. A 




Photo B. The solar panel as used for batten 1 charging. Shown Is the panel, a portable quar- 
ter-wave vertical antenna, a lend -acid gel cell battery* and a Ten-Tec Argosy transceiver in its 
portable case. 







Photo C. The HW-8 transceiver and the solar panel as used for QRP operations. Note the ab- 
sence of a storage battery. 



1/4-20 

Carriage bolt 

6 sa. 



Handle 



Top rail 



LT> 



_± 



i 



* 



I 



.£]_ 



i 

] = 

i CO 

i in 

i ^l 

I Li 



Frame 
cross piece 



3 ea. 



. i 



Bottom rail 



"O' 



iO 



End slat 

c. S3, 



36' 



Front View of Panel 



Figu re I. Tot ally salt i r-po \-\ e \ ed OP P v/ at ion. 



Parts 

10 feet of 1-1/2- by 3/4-inch hard wood 
7 square feet of 1 /4-inch plywood 
6 carriage bolts 1/4-20 and 2 inches long 
2 machine bolts 1/4-20 and 2 inches long 
6 hex nuts f flat washers, and lock washers for 

carriage bolts. 
2 wing nuts with lock washers for machine bolts. 

1 handle home-made aluminum 

2 K LT shaped brackets from pipe hanger material. 
2 aluminum pipe logs 8 to 10 inches long. 



List 

2 silicon diodes type 1N4002 or equivalent, 1 amp. 

50 to 100 pi v. 
1 voltage regulator LM 34QT-12 or LM 31 7T as 

available. 
1 heat sink, aluminum, about 9 sq. inches, 
1 resistor, 370 ohms. 1/2 watt, 

1 resistor, approximately 50 ohms * 1/2 watt. 

2 terminal strips with 2 screws each. 
1 ceramic capacitor 0.1 uF. 



73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 21 



Bottom 
rail 



Carriage bolt 

.An 



Glass 
solar panel 



*-*-+ 



Cross piece 



Groove 
cut in rails 



Top 
rail 



End View of Panel 
(Expanded to show detail) 



Figure 2. front view of pane L 



13V voltage regulator 



Regulated 

output 



Handle 



^ 




Cover latch 




I 



Unregulated 
output 



i r 



Died© 



F^v* 



1 1 x 3' solar panel 



nsfde cover painted 
with aluminum paint 




r 

Tilting leg 



Solar panel cover 
(open) 



Overall View of Panel 



Figure 3. End view of panel (expanded to .show detail). 



EH 



Dipole antenna 
D 



13V r&gulal&d 



Sun's rays 




Solar panel 



Reflective cover 




750 mA 



L, 



Speaker 



Key 



U L 



Built-in 
tuner 




o o o 



onOo 
o ^ o 



-n 



Coaxial 
feedline 



HW-8 transceiver 



2W rtkaximum 
output 



Totally Solar- Powered QRP Station 



Figure 4. Overall view of panel 



Solar 
panel 



-I- Diode 
W— 



Diode 
— W— 



In 



LM340T12 



Unregulated 
output 



Out 



* Change this resistor 

value to change 
regulator output voltage 



370 12 



0.1 







50 a 



+ 

° 13V 

regulated 
output 



Electrical Wiring Diagram 



Figure 5. Electrical wiring diagram. 



: 



oo 



^zy 



" 



a 



Bottom of pane! cabinet 

U-shaped bracket 

1/4-20 bolt 

(makes swivel joint} 



Pipe 



Detail of Pipe Leg 



3/4 Jl 



Figure 6. Detail of pipe leg. 



simple latch is attached to the top rail 
in order to lock the cover in place 
while in transit, The inside of this 
cover is coaled with bright aluminum 
paint. The cover not only protects the 
fragile panel, but also increases the ef- 
ficiency of the panel by re Heeling ad- 
ditional sunlight into the panel when 
the cover is open, 

One additional item is needed. The 
panel must be tilted when it is set up 
for use in order to gather maximum 



i.£ 



A LM 3 17T regulator 

could he used instead 

of the one I used." 

sun light. A pair of folding pipe legs 
are made of aluminum and attached to 
the rear cross pieces where the car- 
riage bolts are attached. These legs 
are attached by home made "LP 
brackets and are about 8 inches long, 
and, when they arc extended, the lilt 
of the panel is about 30 degrees from 
horizontal. The legs fold back when 
not in use. 

The electrical hookup is as shown 
in the diagram. I used a type LM 
340T12 three- terminal regulator and, 
by lifting the ground terminal and us- 
ing a resistor network, I am able to get 
about 13 volLs regulated output. I also 
placed a protective diode between in- 
put and output terminals in order to 



22 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 





WHEN 
YOU 
JOIN 





FOR 

ONLY 



ronics 
Club® 



VALUES TO $1 54. 75 




The leading source of information for electronics hobbyists for over 30 years! 



PRACTICE 
TESTS FOR 
COMIJHfKiaTSONS 
LKBtSNGAHD 
tEKTfFICA!K»H 
EX/MMiHAIfGNS 
fHICOfltftnE 
TAB REFERENCE 



im 'fix. Pi Tij^ A. tas 



■HE 

. ttn 



D70S24X $24.95 



LICENSING AND 



EXAffliKAUONS 
THE COJVLPiETE 
TAB REFERENCE 



■ it-V^tt 



• :■; 
<■■■:,:■ 
■ ;i. 



07Q8223-XX $d4,9S 

Counts as 2/H a rdc over 




GUIDE 






*qptt a»; ^<l _+ i 



0369364 $29.95 

Hardcover 




CIRCUIT 
DESIGN 



•ffrawi.- nw 



^- -■-■"'- 



37J0P $21.95 




THE GIANT BOOK OF 

ELECTKONICS 
PR0|ECTS 




McGtaw-Hill CIRCUIT 

ENCYCLOPEDIA 

AMD 

TROUBLESHOOTING 
GUIDE, Volume 1 






The Radio Amateur's 

DIGITAL 

COMMUNICATIONS 





HANDBOOK 




0339635 $24.95 

Hdfdcover 



1367P $29.95 



0376034-XX $59.50 

Counts as 2/ Hardcover 



3362P $14.95 




0306362 513,95 



4359P $21.95 



58692H-XX 546.00 

Counts as 2/Hardcover 



McGRAW-HlLL 
ELECTRONICS 
DICTIONARY 

i H,,- T .(,,- :.i:.in IPtnisrulr-p-.- 



3 O H * : . W A P S .t! H 
N 1 I i t-C-'i: k T E E 



Q40434A-XX $49.50 

Counts as 2/Hardcover 




Counts as 2/Hardcover 





RECEIVER PROJECTS 



a& 










i K 



If* lJu, Si Cbm=Mly Pi^hcIe 



riHC^a^WffJK? 1 ■>!■;■: .:- ;■■ :■■*::■. 



4256P $lft.95 




Q32381XXXX $119.50 

Counts as 3/Hcrdcover 



As a member of the 
ELECTRONICS BOOK CLUB..* 

you'll enpy receiving Club bulletins every 3-4 
weeks containing exciting offers on the lot est 
books in the tieEd erf savings of up to 50%- off the 
regular publishers' prices, rf you want trie Main 
Selection, do nothing and it will be shipped 
automatically. If you want another book, or no 
book at oiL simply return the repfy form to us by the 
date specified. You If have at least 10 days to 
decide. It you ever receive a book you don't want 
due to late delivery' o* the bulletin, you can return 
it at our expense. Your only obligation is to pur- 
chase 3 more books during the next 12 months, 
after which you may cancel your membership of 
any time. And you'll be eligible tor FREE BOOKS 
through out Bonus Book Program. 



H 



-@ PHONE: 1-614-759-3666 

(8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST Monday-Friday) 

FAX: 1-614-759-3749 

(24 hours a day, 7 days a week) 




I 



Electronics 






i 



* 



i 



Book Club 

A Division of The McGraw-Hiit Companies, P.O. Box 549 , Bo c Wick. OH 43004-9913 

YES! Please send me the books listed below, billing me just $4.95 plus shipping/ hand fin a &. tax. 
Enroll me as a member of the Electronics. Book Club according to the terms outlined irvrhis ad. 
If not satisfied, I may return the books within 10 days without obligation and have my mem- 
bership cancelled. 



If you select a book that counts as 2 choices, write the book number in one box and XX in the next 
If you select a counts as three choice, write the book number in one box and XXX in the next two boxes. 



Name. 



Address/ Apt. #. 
City /State 



I 



Zip- 



Phone. 



I Valid for new members only, subject to acceptance by EBC. Canada must remit in U.S. funds drawn on U.S. 

banks. Applicants outside the U.S. and Canada will receive special ordering instructions Publishers' prices 

I shown . A shipping/handling charge & sales tax will be aded to all orders. STAR1 095 



A shipping/handling charge and soles tax will be added to all orders. All books are softcover unless otherwise noted. (Publishers' Prices Shown) ©1995 EBC 
If coupon is missing, write to: Electronics Book Club. A Division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, P.O. Box 549, Blacklick, OH 43004-9916 



IS YOUR SHACK GROUNDED? 




1/8" x VI' 
110 Copper 



Ground 



«n 



Helps Protect Expensive Equipment 

and Reduces QRN. 

Solid Copper Buss Stainless Steel 

Hardware Grounding Stud 

Every 6 Inches 

Ground all of your equipment 

chasis's to a single earth ground in 

one easy installation. 

2 ft. $11.95 3 ft $16.95 4 ft. $21 ,95 

$5,00 S&H + $2.00 each add 1 ! per buss 

Custom Lengths Available 

Mail check/money order 



Flexible Rope Wire Straps w/Term. 

Ends All Solid Copper $2.00 Per Ft 

S&H free w/buss order, $3.00 without 



Money Back Guarantee if not Satisfied 

J.M.S. 

| JMarttn Systems \ 

35 Hilltop Ave. Dept. 7 * Stamford, CT 06907 



Pocket Morse 
Code Trainer 

Learn Code Faster & Easier 
Better than code tapes 
Take it anywhere to practice 
Ideal for beginners to advance 




Features: 

* Code rates from 3 to 31 wpm 

* Plays standard or Farnsworth. $29.00 

* Dimensions V x 3*8" x 2.4" 

* Runs 40 hr on one 9v battery 

3 Modes of Operation 

1. ConUnious fresh random code, 

( selectable Letter groups. ie A-Z* 0-9, and more) 

2, Random code practice lest, 

( Ctaect your accuracy sgainlt the Answer key) 
X Interactive training mode 

Deluxe Pocket 
Morse Code Trainer 

6 Modes of Operation $49.00 

The deluxe unit has 3 additional modes 

4, Conlinious newly generated QSO. 

( New QSO are generated everytintc) 

5, Practice code exams jus I like the real 
code lest. (incl. answer key to check accuracy} 

6, Continious random words 

Computer Aided Technology ViiaAMC, Add $5 S&H 
10132 Monroe Dr., Da I! at, T* 7522* PH 214*350-0888 




Trident TR2400 
Scanning Receiver 

lOOKHz to 2060MHz 
with AM/FM/WFM/ 
BFO/SSBlKHz steps 

Features 1000 memory 

channels, lockout on search 

and scan, backlighted LCD 

display, Attenuator, Delay, 

Hold, Bank lockout, VFO 

tuning, Signal strength meter 

in display. Programmable 

search/scan delay times, One 

Year Warranty^ Cellular Locked out. Size: 

7.5H x 3 3/4W x 2 1/4D, Wt I4oz. Ground 

shipping: £6, 9 5, Air Freight: $9.95, Call or 

Fax your order Loll Free, 24 hours a day. 




=h£b^S=^ 





1 



MM 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Call \M ft gfdjl 

1 -800-445 771 7 ■■-«■ "^ 



10707 E, 106th Street Fishers, IN 46038 
317-842-7115 Fax 1 -800-448-1084 

CIRCLE 164 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




TRONIC 
COMPONENTS 

Whether you order 1 part or 

all 54,123...MOUSER stocks 

and.. .ships same day!! 



CIRCLE 276 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CALL..(800) 992-9943 



for your 

FREE 

CATALOG 



958 North Main St. 



Mansfield, TX 76063 

MOUSER 

ELECTRONICS 

Sales & Stocking Locations Nationwide 

CIRCLE 64 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




protect the regulator while the battery is 
charging, 

A LM 317T regulator could be used 
instead of the one I used. The diode be- 
tween the regulator and solar panel pre- 
vents the storage battery from discharg- 
ing back through the panel when the 
battery terminal voltage is higher than 
the output from the solar panel. The by- 
pass capacitor is used to help keep RF 
energy from causing problems with the 
regulator and the solar panel. Further- 
more, you could employ a lead-acid 
storage battery at either the unregulated 
or the regulated output terminals. The 
unregulated output charges quickly but 
could overcharge the battery. The regu- 
lated output charges more slowly, thus 
preventing overcharge, because as the 
battery voltage approaches 13 volts the 
charge rate slows down and finally al- 
most stops. 

Note; If your solar panel is larger or 
smaller than the one shown in this arti- 
cle, then it will be necessary for you to 



"This setup is ideal for 
Field Day operations with 

a small lead-acid 
storage battery to store the 

surplus electric power, " 

change the size of the rails and cross- 
pieces to accommodate your panel 

This solar panel powers the HW-8 
transceiver very nicely, as the current 
requirements for the HW-8 are 90 mA 
in receive mode, and 430 mA in trans- 
mit mode. It will probably power other 
similar QRP transceivers. 

I find that QSOs can continue even 
though light clouds tend to obscure the 
sun. The power will start to drop off 
slightly but there is no sign of frequency 
instability or chirp, as the VFO in the 
HW-8 is stabilized at 9/1 volts, I have 
made many successful QSOs using just 
the solar panel, the HW-8, and a dipole 
antenna. When I tell the operator on the 
other end that I am solar powered, I am 
sure he does not realize that the signal 
he is hearing is generated by power di- 
rectly from the sun at that very moment. 
This setup is ideal for Field Day opera- 
tions with a small lead-acid storage bat- 
tery to store the surplus electric power. 
Please do not use NiCds with this setup, 
as the charging current is not compati- 
ble with that type of battery. 

I guess you know that if you operate 
as I do, without a battery, you automati- 
cally become a fair-weather ham. 



24 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



Explore The World of Quorum Wefax 





Wefax Explorer 

Integrated Wefax / APT Receiver and Sain 
Converter with Qfax software. 

$695.00 complete 

shipping and taxes not included 

The Best Price I Performance. Period! 

Construct a Wefax /APT reception system from individual component receivers, scan converters and image processing software 

and you'll spend more money for fewer features, poorer performance* no automation and a jungle of wires. Wiih the Wefax 

Explorer, simply connect an antenna and a few mouse clicks later you're receiving the highest 4uahiy images possible. The 

Explorer is backed by a 1 year limited warranty and the extensive experience of the leading Wefax hardware manufacturer. 

Quorum equipment is used by virtually all wefax suppliers in worldwide amateur, commercial and military systans. 

QFAX Features 

I GOES / Meteosat Wefax Reception 

I NOAA / Meteor APT Reception 

I HF Nafax Reception 

Dual RF ports for geosync and polar 
reception under software control 

I Integrated preamp and down con- 
verter power inserters 

i 50 user definable configurations 

I Software controlled receiver with 2 
UHF % 16 VHF memories and scan 

On board audio amplifier and 
speaker with software controlled vol- 
ume, squelch and mute 

Automatic Unattended Animation 
works continuously 

8 bit data for up to 256 gray levels 

View at up to 1280 x 1924 256 color 

Use TIFF, GIF or PCX file formats 
and convert to BMP, JPEG, EPS 
and binary 

Contrast, Brightness, 3D effect, 
Sharpen* Smooth, Noise, Histo- 
grams and other image processing 





Integrated Satellite visibility pre- 
dict ion with automatic capture for 
up to 8 satellites simultaneously 

Automatic time and ephemeris 
stamping for navigation 

2 7 day programmable schedulers 

Automatic digital gain lock in 
ALL modes, PLL clocking 



Ephemeris based NOAA APT navi- 
gation with geo-political and Ijkt- 
Lon overlays 

NOAA Tools show satellite path, 
lAt-lMn of cursor, distance and 
hearing to reference point 

Automatic Temperature Calibration 

Color Palettes and NOAA curves 



Quorum Communications, Inc. r\ \<2 i-i > <h 5-0270 

8304 Esters Blvd. - Suite 850 - Irving. Texas 75063 <214) 915-0256 BBS (214) «J 15-0346 



CIRCLE 257 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



Number 7 on your Feedback card 



Armstrong Updated 

A high-performance, regenerative short-wave receiver 



by David Crtpe KC3ZQ 



I' have happily not iced thai in recent 
years there has been quile a resur- 
gence of interest in regenerative 
receiver circuits, ll is not altogether sur- 
prising because it is one of the aims of 
Liny home-brew enthusiast to build equip* 
men t with performance close to that of 
commercial gear, but at a much lower 
cosL Regenerative shortwave receivers 
have been a perennial favorite project of 
hams, as they arc one of the few projects 
in which a simple home-brew rig can 
approach ihe performance of a store- 
bought receiver. 

Plenty of old-timers can remember that 
as late as the mid-1960s the ARRL Hand- 
book and ham magazines contained nu- 
merous plans for regenerative sets intend- 
ed for construction by the beginning ham 
or SWL. There are plenty of others ini\- 
sclf included) who got their start in radio 
by building simple regenerative rigs. The 
regenerative receiver, invented by 
Howard Armstrong back in the early pari 
of this century, is a good choice (or kii 
builders and home-brewers, as il is possi- 
ble to obtain reasonably good receiver 
performance from a circuit that is simple 
enough for most folks to build for them- 
selves. 



History 

A regenerative detector is nothing more 
than an antenna coupled to the resonant 
inductor-capacitor circuit of an RF oscil- 
lator. The oscillator serves as an RF am- 
plifier, bandpass filter, and detector. By 
adjusting the amount of RF feedback 
within the circuit so lhat il is at the thresh- 
old of oscillation, you can render the sen- 
sitivity and selectivity of a regenerative 
receiver equal to lhat of a superhet receiv- 
er. Plus, the regenerative oscillator ac^ 

it. 

analogous!) to the BHO in a superhet al- 
lowing reception of CW and SSB signals, 
in addition to AM. 

So why aren't regeneraiives more pop- 
ular today? Well, regenerative receivers 
are not without their problems. My First 
regenerative set, as 1 recall, suffered from 
the shortcomings thai have plagued most 
other regenerative receivers. The receiver 
had an annoying audio oscillation that 
would occur al some settings of regenera- 
tion. It was very sensitive to hand capaci- 
tance: once you removed your hand from 
the tuning knob, il would shifi the tuning 
frequency off station. Also the regenera- 
tion control was not smooth. While bcine 
adjusted, it would pop abruptly in or out 
of oscillation, making it difficult to find 




P halo A, The completed Armximng Updated regenerative wee her. 



the "sweetspot" of maximum sensitivity 
al the threshold of oscillation. The circuit 
would not regenerate at all positions on 
the band. And had there been any other 
hams in my neighborhood at lhat lime, 
they would have reported another prob- 
lem with my receiver Most regenerative 
receivers radiate an RF signal at the fre~ 
quency to which they arc tuned, creating 
QRM for anybody else listening on that 
frequence As a result of these phenome- 
na, ihe regenerative receiver, which was 
the preferred technology for AM broad- 
cast receivers through the 1920s, lost out 
in favor of one of Howard Armstrong's 
other inventions: the more expensive and 
complicated >uperhclerodync. 

Correcting the Flaws 

I have always thought that if these 
problems with Armstrong's regenerative 
receiver could be corrected, a portable re- 
general tve shortwave receiver would 
make a great home-brew project. In ihe 
past dozen or so years, Tve probably 
breadboarded 10 different experimental 
designs, some of them frankly quite horri- 
ble, but each providing new insight into 
the causes and cures of these problems. I 
finally arrived at a design thai performs 
nicely* is well behaved, and is not overly 
complicated to construct (sec Photo A). 

Figure 2 shows the schematic of the cir- 
cuit. There are a number of unique fea- 
tures in this design that give il its trouble- 
free performance. The tendency for regen- 
erative receivers to radiate oscillator- fre- 
quency signals is eliminated here by plac- 
ing a transistor buffer Ql between the an- 
tenna preselector circuit LI*Cla and the 
regenerative oscillator-tuned circuit L2- 
Clb, This buffer also nearly eliminates 
hand-capacitance effects, 

This design is also unique in lhat it uses 
an 1C for the regenerative detector. U 1, an 
LMI4% double-balanced mixer, is used 
here in a somewhat unorthodox manner. 
The differential "Signal Input" amplifier 
transistors internal to the IC are used as a 
Hartley oscillator in conjunction with L2 



26 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



03R iVlTAHHH303FI 30^AWHO=lfl3q HOIH 




01 



* 
2 





AhfTGND 



HIGH PERFORMANCE 
REGENERATIVE 
RECOVER 




r C\5 



by FAR CIRCUITS KC3ZQ 73*4 



•$H 



— Iminri- 



10u 






T1 



R12 V_^ 



\± 



regen! ^ 
cont.Orh 6 

4.7k 



T 



C10 



*jfc 




47u 



CIS 



16 56K 



C20S~\ 
lOutJ 





G*9d 






UZ 



C21 

O 

10u 



VOL 1£ 3K 

CONT, 



o 

OS 

£ 



T2 



CO 

tu 
z 
O 

X 



o 



^ 



pj 



Figure J. Primed circuit board layout (FAR Circuits), 



and Clb. The regenerative feedback for 
this oscillator is supplied by the output of 
the "Gain Adjust" pins of the LM1496, 
Some of the oscillator output is coupled 
to one of the "Carrier Input" pins via C9, 
which allows the mixer section of Ul to 
act as asynchronous detector, greatly im- 
proving the RF detection sensitivity over 
that of other regenerative circuits. The re* 
generation level is controlled by the volt- 
age level applied to the "Bias" pin of Ul. 
The circuit containing R12 and transistor 
Q2 is used as a variable voltage source, 
providing the regeneration level immuni- 
ty from supply voltage ripple. This bias 
level controls the quiescent current level 
through the "Signal Input" amplifier tran- 
sistors, which in turn determines the emit- 
ter-outpui-impedancc of these transistors, 
controlling the amount of power deliv- 
ered to the feedback winding of L2, This 
results in a very smooth and predictable 
regeneration control. 

The outputs of U 1 are coupled through 
audio transformer Tl into the first section 
of U2 r an LM324 op amp. This first sec- 
tion is configured as an audio bandpass 
filter, rolling off the audio response below 
300 and above 3,000 Hz. Volume control 
is achieved through U2d and variable re- 
sistor R18. The output of U2d is buffered 
by U2b and U2e, which provide a push- 



pull output for audio transformer T2, giv- 
ing us headphone-level audio into 8-ohm 
phones. The audio oscillation encountered 
in many other regenerative receiver de- 
signs is due to supply voltage ripple cou- 
pling into their high-gain discrete-transis- 
tor audio amplifiers. Op amps have very 
high rejection of supply voltage ripple ef- 
fects, so they have much better immunity 
to this oscillation phenomenon, Using a 
push-pull audio output stage, as is done 
here, also reduces susceptibility to audio 
oscillation. 



The only compromise in this design 
was the choice to make it a single-band 
receiver. Although the use of switched or 
plug-in coils could have allowed multi- 
band reception, in the interest of simplici- 
ty this was not done. However, the values 
of LI and L2 allow coverage of 5 to 15 
MHz, where much of the shortwave ac- 
tion occurs. 

Construction 

There are two antenna terminals provid- 
ed. The tl Hi Z" connection is for short an- 




Photo B. Under the hood of the Armstrong Updated receiver. 



73 Amateur Radio Today * Octobe r, 1 995 27 



TUNING 



R12 

5k 

REGENERATION 



ANTENNA 
LOW Z 

HIGH ZV 



GND>- 




10 pF 

BAND SPREAD 
(OPTIONAL) 



01 
2N3904 




Cll 
0,1 



3r 



10 



i 



^SIGNAL 
IN POT 

CAIN 
ADJUST 



SIGNAL 
INPUT 



bias 



LM1496 



OUTPUT 



CARRIER 
INPUT 

♦J 



+ 9V 



m 



t 



C15 
47 M F 



/77 



C13 
0.001 



Tl 



t 



13 



lh, 



V- 



m 



CI 4 
0.001 



fff 

aft 



R13 
10 



CIS 
47 M F 



r 



■*WV 



K 




R14 
10 



C17 
10 fiF 



ft? 




fff 



Bl 
9V 



VOLUME 



C19 
10>iF 



R17 



de 




rib 

100 k 




UZ 
LM324 



/3V 



R20 

10k R19 

'WV 




PHONES 



Figure 2. Schematic diagram for the Armstrong Updated regenerative receiver. 



tennas. and the "Low Z" connection is for 
antenna wires greater than roughly 3 feci 
in length. The "Low Z" antenna terminal 
couples energy into the preselector circuit 
through a C23, a 'gimmick" capacitor 
constructed out of two 1" pieces of insu- 
lated wire twisted tightly together. This 
helps prevent overload of the RF circuitry, 
which mighi occur from more powerful 
stations. Experiment for best results. 

The inductors LI and L2 are wound on 
Amidon T-50-2 iron-powder toroids, The 
primaries of each consist of 27 turns of 
#30 magnet wire distributed evenly 
around the core, The secondary of LI 
consists of six turns of #22 gage stranded, 
insulated hook-up wire. The secondary of 
L2 consists of two turns of #22 hookup 



wire. Try to keep these windings short 
and direct to the circuit board. 

The tuning of the receiver is done with 
variable capacitor Cla and Clb. Using a 
dual-gang capacitor makes the tuning of 
the antenna preselector and the regenera- 
tive oscillator track automatically. It may 
be difficult to obtain dual-ganged 365 pF 
variable capacitors, but check at your next 
hamfesl, or with surplus dealers such as 
Fair Radio Sales, The value of lhe.se vari- 
ables could be larger than 365 pF and still 
work well. Otherwise, two separate ca- 
pacitors could be used, U is also very 
helpful to use a vernier drive on the tun- 
ing capacitor, so that closely spaced sta- 
tions can be separated, Optionally, a 
bandspread capacitor, a 10 or 20 pF vari- 



able, can be added in parallel with Clb. 
Use whatever you can find. 

With the relatively small quantity of 
components used here, I was able to con- 
struct the entire receiver on one of Radio 
Shack's solder- pad perf boards, #276- 
168. Alternately, dead-bug construction 
techniques could be used to construct the 
circuit on a piece of blank, copper-clad 
PC board material approximately 3" by 
4'\ For ease of construction, a drilled and 
etched PC board (Figure 1) is available 
for $6 plus $1.50 S & H per order from 
FAR Circuits, 18N640 Field Court, 
Dundee, IL60U8. 

Finally, mount the entire assembly in a 
metal enclosure (see Photo A). This will 
provide additional shielding against oscil- 



28 73 Amateur Radio Today 9 October, 1 995 



HOW IT ALL STARTED 

We wanted \o offer the most affordable 
HF rig in the industry and still provide 
real performance for even the most expe- 
rienced ham. In recent years, many hams 
requested a "back to basics" transceiver 
that was simple to use, We reviewed all 
the latest design techniques, selected the 
best concepts from the 20 rigs we 
designed over these 25 years anaaslced 
500 hams across the country for their 
ideas. 

WE CALL IT THE SCOUT 

Every feature can be 

mastered in minutes. No 
modern rig is as easy to 
use. It only takes o second 
to change bonds. Plug-in 
modules are available for 
1 60- 1 meters including 
WARC Single con- 
version and crystal 
mixing are the 
foundation of this 90 
dB dynamic range 
receiver That's the strong signal 
performance of rigs costing 3 times as 
much! It's sensitive and receive audio is 
sparkling clean with less than 2% distor- 
tion* The ideal selectivity for every band 
condition is at the touch of a knob. This 
patented "Jones'' filter provides variable 
l-F bandwidth from 500 Hz to 2.5 KHz. 

HERE'S HOW IT'S USED 

MOBILE 

Hams complain about today's cars 
having precious little space for gear. The 
SCOUT is the smallest HF rig in the 
industry (excluding QRP] measuring only 
2.5" x 7,25* x 9.75" and runs directly 



off the 1 2 VDC car batierv If the SCOUT 
won't fit your car, nothing will. The 
optional noise blanker reduces ignition 
noise from both your car and the one 
that just drove by. 

PORTABLE 

Business travelers and vacationing hams 
typically set up a briefcase or small 




travel bag to include the 5 lb SCOUT, 
wire or whip antenna and lightweight 
power supply like our Model 938 
switcher {its only 3 lbs!). It is surprising 
how many hikers and cyclists take along 
their SCOUT using some clever battery 
arrangement. 

NEW HAMS 

The SCOUT is the most economical way 
to get started in ham rodio. Consider the 
choice a new ham must make just to test 
his interest in HF: (1) Spend nearly 
SI 000 or more on a new rig, (2) buy a 
used radio and take a chance on its 



condition, or (3) invest in a SCOUT at 
$549 with a one year factory warranty 
and our legendary TEN -TEC support, 

OLD TIMERS 

Operators with years of experience and a 
shack full of expensive HF gear also buy 
the SCOUT. It's refreshing to many who 
say "It takes 5 minutes to learn and 
without all the complicated features, there 
is only one thing to do with a 
SCOUT, work someone!" 
Experienced hams call us 
constantly to report "\ 
can't believe this 
receiver, it outperforms 
my $1400 synthesized 

n 9 • 

CALL TODAY: 
1 -800-833-7373 

(U.S. & Canada) 

Call Ten-Tec from 9:00 AM to 
5:30 PM Eastern time, Monday 
through Friday for more information or to 
order. You can reach our repair depart- 
ment at 61 5-428-0364 from 9:00 AM to 
4:00 PM. You can also FAX at 61 5-428- 
4483 or write us at 1 1 85 Dolly Parton 
Parkway, Sevier vi lie, TN 37862. 

ATTENTION QRP ENTHUSIASTS 

The SCOUT has a little brother, the ARGO 
556. It is identical to the SCOUT without 
the 50 watt final, adjustable 1 -5 waits 
output TX-2 Amps, RX-.6 Amps. 
Only $489* 




"SYNCHRO-LOCK" software keeps 
VFO virtually drift free regardless 
of temperature variation. 

SSB and CW 50 Watts Output 
Adjustable To 5 Watts 

Runs Off 1M4VDQTX-10 
Amps, RX - + 6 Amps 

Receive Offset Tuning 

Built-in Iambic Keyer with 
Legendary QSK. Speed adjustable 
on front and shown in display. 



$549* 



Includes one band 
module of your choice 

$29' Each additional band module 
SCOUT ACCESSORIES; 

MODEL 



PRICE* 



296 


Mobile Bracket 


$15.00 


297 


Noise Blanker 


$19.50 


937 


1 1 Amp Power Supply 


$79,00 


938 


Tiny Switching Supply 
(Only 3 lbs!) 


S95,00 


700C 


Hand Mike 


S39.95 


607 


Weighed Key Paddle 


S39.Q0 


291 


Antenna Tuner 


589,00 



VISA, MC, DISCOVER 

"Plus shipping and handling; call toll-free for charges. 



TEN-TEC 

© 1994 Ten-Tec, Inc. 

MADE IN 
USA 



Introducing lDCits 

A new division of Ten-Tec 

Call 615-453-7172 

to request your 

kit catalog 



,BackPack Solar? 

10 w^u DcstnSiorm pjind h 

size of open 73 magazine, weighs 

lib. and ddivers fcflOmA for [2v 

ehareing or dirta opera turn, lough* 

Solid, wuh no uUss 10 fcrcuJc. So 

rugged Uncle £jjti u!tc<S ih J> im 

spoiler comrnun-cjL tuns and portable 

repeaters in Dc&trl Sloim 

Ready M) use. $169. Add $5 Ma Info Si. 




N 



.4/rfefi fuulfef 
Br* 50002 Prove UT 34*05 



Onkr HoiLnc 



CIRCLE 340 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Say You Saw it In 

73 Amateur Radio Today 



hambrew 



FOR AMATEUR RADIO DESIGNERS 
AND BUILDERS Quarterly 

$ 10/yr. 
NEW 

LOW 

HIUrr-rMEA RATEfT! P" ICCi 




• HAMBREW Contests 
From Kits To RF Design * New Products 

• Free Classified Ads To Subscribers 
• Design Awards For Amateur Builders 



$15 vr (Canada, Mexico) ■ $2Uvr. Until) 

PO Box 260083-Lakewood. CO SQ226 
VISA'MC only: 1-303-989-5642 



CIRCLE 2B£ ON READER SERVICE CARD 



F%£S. 



^STATIC DISCHARGER 

from *^^H 

Yes, you can help eliminate lighting 
strikes to your tower or antenna with 
our new Tower*Guard, Made entirely 
of stainless steel, this newest addition 
to our line can never rust and will last 
almost indefinitely. You will never get 
a second chance at avoiding a lighting 
strike, so let our Tower *Guard help 
avoid them for you. 




Retail — S 129.50 U Ham Net — $99.50 
S/H S5.50 Send check or MO for $105 to: 





PO Box 82321- Baton Rouge, LA 70884-2321 

(Allow Uuec *ccJei lor delurn > 

For information, call (504) $24-7708 



I later radiation and hand-capacitance* It 
takes some extra work over that of a 
breadboard layout but is worth it. I also 
recommend mounting the PC board with 
a l/T'-thick piece of foam rubber sand- 
wiched between it and the chassis, using 
double-sided adhesive tape. This helps re- 
duce any tendency for microphonics. 

The only potentially tricky part in as- 
sembling this project lies in getting the 
secondary of L2 wired in the proper direc- 
tion. Connect a short (one foot is fine) an- 
tenna to the "Hi Z" antenna terminal, turn 
on the power to the unit, then advance the 
volume control to its midpoint while lis- 
tening to the output on your headphones. 
Slowly rotate the "Regeneration" control 
from one end of its range to another. You 
should notice at some point in its travel a 
fairly abrupt increase (or decrease) in au- 



dio noise in the phones, indicating that os- 
cillation has begun. If the noise level in 
the phones remains constant while rotat- 
ing the "Regeneration" control, you prob- 
ably have L2 l s secondary wired in re- 
verse- Swap the ends of the winding, and 
try again. If there is still no change, try in- 
creasing the number of turns on the L2 
secondary from two to three, and repeal. 

In operation, the receiver is surprisingly 
sensitive. With a I -foot antenna and no 
ground, 1 was able to pick up over 2 
dozen broadcasters. With the regeneration 
control at the threshold of oscillation, the 
selectivity was such that there was no 
adjacent channel interference, and the 
headphone volume was more than ade- 
quate. Pretty impressive for 80-ycarold 
technology! I would like to think How r ard 
Armstrong would approve. 



Notes 

Vernier drives are available 
through Mouser and Fair Radio. 

Mauser stocks a dual- 
ganged 266 pF miniature vari- 
able cap l f24TR2ia, which may 
be used with the same frequen- 
cy coverage if the primaries of 
L1 and 12 are increased to 32 
turns eaeh. 

56k resistors and the 
LM1496 are available through 
Mouser, Dig i Key, or on special 
order through Radio Shack. 



oourccS 

Amtdon 

12033 Otsego St. 

Norm Hollywood CA 9 1607 

(310) 763-5770 

Qigi-Key 

701 Brooks Ave. South 

&0 Box 677 

Thief River Faffs MN 56701 

(218)661-6674 



Fair Radio Sales 
1016 £ Eureka 
Box 1105 

Uma OH 45802 
(419)227^573 

FAR Circuits 
18N64Q Field Court 
Dundee. IL 60118 

Mouser Electronics 
11433 WoodsideAve^ 
Sanree CA 92071 
(817)483-0165 









Parts List 




Part* 






Value 


RS# 


All resistors 1/4 W unless noted. 






R1.16 






56k 


See below 


R2-9, 19, 


20 




10k 


271-1335 


R10, 11 






47k 


271-1330 


R12 






5k Var. Audio 


271-1720 


R13, 14 






10 ohm 


271-1301 


R15, 17 






1k 


271-1321 


R18 






100k Var, Audio 


271-1722 


CI 






365 pF, 2-gang variabfe 


See below. 


C2.9, 13, 


14 




0,001 \x¥ 


272-126 


C3.5, 12, 


17, 


19-21 


10 jiF lytic 


272-1025 


C4. 7 t 8 h ' 


tO t 11,22 


0.1 uF mono coram. 


272-109 


C6 






100 pF 


272-123 


C15. 16 






47 ^F "lytic 


272-1027 


018 






0.022 mF 


272-1066 


Q1.2 






2N39Q4 or equiv NPN 


276201 6 or 276-1617 


U1 






LM1496 balanced mixer 


See below 


U2 






LM324 Op amp 


270-1711 


T1,2 






lk:8-ohm audio xfmr 


27^1380 


LI 






Amtdon T-50-2 

Primary: 27 turns #30 wire 

Secondary: 6 lums #22 wire 




L2 






Amkton T-50-2 

Pnmaiy: 27 turns #30 wire 

Secondary: 2 turns #22 wire 




SI 






SPST poi switch, mounts on R1B 


271-1740 



A Note from Wayne Green W2NSD/1 



One of the first really popular ham receivers 
was the National SW-3, a regenerative receiver 
That was state-of-the-art in the earfy 1930s when 
I first got involved with amateur radio. My first 
ham building project was the RSR receiver, which 
was regenerative on the shortwave bands and su- 
per- regen on the VHF bands. When I was as- 
signed to the USS Drum (SS-22S) \n 1343, we 



still had regenerative receivers for the tower 
bands, Eventually I got superhets to replace 
them, hut you'll notice when you visit the Drum In 
Mobile that the old regenerative receivers are 
back in place. Also check out the plaques with 
stones about our patrol runs. I wrote those sto- 
ries, and the whole series is available from Uncle 
Wayne's Bookshelf for $7-50. 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 



Have Beam, Will Travel! 



Shake, twist — your walking stick becomes a beami 



t 



How would you like a 
four element 2 meter yagi 
that travels the mountain 
trails as as walking stick? 
Pick a rest stop, remove the 
end cap, shake out the ele- 
ments and feedline, and in 
two minutes your HT is full 
quieting wherever you point 
it. 

Finished resting? Un- 
screw the elements and drop 
them into the boom; you're 
ready for travel. But whenev- 
er you get the urge, it T s there, 
ready to zero in on a jammer, 
chase a radio fox, or shoot 
your signal out of a hole in 
time of difficulty. 

What is it? ArrowBeam. 
It shoots straight and true, 
and its strong flexible ele- 
ments are stored in the boom 
like arrows in a quiver. It 
weights only a pound and a 
half and is balanced in the 
hand, but it can take abuse. 

Keep it in the trunk of the 
car. It's tough exterior pro- 
tects everything against dam- 
age as it gets tossed and 
knocked about. But when its 
time for action — shake, twist. 



and ArrowBeam is ready to 
shoot your RF right where 
you want it. 

This handy versatile an- 
tenna is made to be dropped, 
bumped, and stepped on 
while you are racing through 
brush and branches in pursuit 
of the elusive radio fox. 
Drop it? It bounces. Snag a 
low limb as you drive by? 
Twang! the tempered ele- 
ments just spring back into 
position. Sit on it? You'll 
need a bandaid for your fan- 
ny, but ArrowBeam will be 
ready for more. 

Of course ArrowBeam 
will do just fine in an attic or 
on a mast even though it's 
made for the torture of the T- 
hunL 

Performance? ArrowBeam 
scored best for its boom 
length at the Dayton VHP 
competition. It's the antenna 
chosed by the FAA for its 
spook beacon and rogue ELT 
search teams. 

Now you can have Ar- 
rowBeam's performance and 
toughness for your radio ad- 
ventures. 







m 




Half-Size ArrowBeam? 

Now there's a version of Ar- 
rowBeam that breaks down 
to half the Walking Stick 
size — the Grab-N-Go Arrow 
Beam. For storage the boom 
separates at the center, so 
the whole antenna stores in 
half the length— perfect for 
slipping in a backpack. 

You get the same great 
performance, the same ease 
of assembly, the same robust 
durability, but Grab-N-Go 
fits in your suitcase. 

The Grab-N-Go Arrow- 
Beam comes in its own for- 
est green stuff sack. There's 
extra room there for other 
goodies you may wish to 
carry with your beam — 
feedline, homebrew PVC 
mast, omnidirectional Pico-J 
antenna, etc. This is the ver- 
sion Becca is taking on her 
trip. 



ArrowBeams 

• Walking Stick 2m $79 

Elements 4 Boom Length 48" 
Gain 6.1 dB Front/Back \QA dB 
SWR <LI min, <1.5 band edges 

Add $6 S&H 

• Grab-N-Go 2m $89 
Same as above, but breaks down 
to <25" for storage, Masi mount 
and Forest Green Stuff Sack in- 
cluded. Add $6 S&H 

• Walking Stick 70cm $49 
Elements 5 Boom Length 40" 
Gain 7,3 dB Front/Back 12.1 dB 
SWR <1.I min,<1.5 band edges 

Add $5 $&H 

Other Range Extenders 

• Pico- J 2m $19.95 ppd 

• Pico-J 2m/70em $26 ppd 

• 2m Packet Pico J $22 ppd 

• TigerTail (2m/70cm) $8 ppd 

Save $5 

Order more than one item and 
knock $5 and shipping off the 
price of each after the first. 






r, 



Yes, Send ArrowBeam: DwS2m DWS70cm DGnG 2ml 
Yes, Send my D Pico-J Model: DTigerTail 

Name^ I 



□ 



I 
I 



Call _ 
Street. 
City. 



Phone 



Apt 



State 



Zip. 



L. 



AnteniiasWest ^o?ak OrderHotline 

Box 50062-5 Provo UT 84605 0> 1 oOU 926 1513 



I 
I 



J 



CIRCLE 57 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number a on your Feedback card 



Link it All! 

Why settle for operation on just two bands? 

by Klaus Spies WB9YBM 



The modern generation of dual- 
band radios has shown us the 
benefits and convenience of be- 
ing able to operate on two VHF or UHF 
bands at once. But why limit yourself to 
just two bands? Here's a way to in- 
crease the benefits, as well as the fun, of 
operating multiple VHF and UHF bands 
all at once. 

lb obtain a signal from a receiver that 
indicates a positive voltage (logic 1 ) 



when a signal is received^ you can use 
the receive indicator (usually an LED), 
or obtain a signal from a transceiver's 
squelch 1 . Figure 1 shows one easy ap- 
proach to adding an interface to your 
transceiver. 

Figure 1 also illustrates the basic con- 
cept of linking two transceivers; not 
shown {but to be added later as 
desired/required) are optional timers to 
avoid noise bursts randomly toggling on 



a transmitter, combined with a hang- 
timer-. 

Figures 2 and 3 show how you can 
use logic gates to add more transceivers 
into a link, including a way of figuring 
out how many gates are required for the 
quantity of transceivers (and options) in 
an entire system. Examples of options 
include local microphone/speaker, IDer, 
and autopatch. This approach is wired 
so that if any one input (receiver, local 



+13^ ev 



"■#■" IN 

WHEN A SIGNAL. : 
IS HEARD 



"+" side or 

RECEIVE 
INDICATOR 
CL.£.D. f ETC. > 




7K 



Ol 
2N2222 



GND SIDE 

RECEIVE 

INDICATOR 



OF 



ft«« ■ ■ HHHH 



BUFFER 



+I2V 



"+" OUT NHET4 A 
SIGNAL IS HEARD 



R3 
lOK 



G2 
2N2222 : 



> 



■ 



TO PTT 

CIRCUITRY 

ON LINK BOARD 

OR ANOTHER 

TRANSCEIVER, 

TIME-OUT 

TIMER, ETC- 



INVERTER 



HSZO 

UK 



ITn"3 ^ 



Figure I. 



U1A 



31 



U1B 




:riO 



^Merc 



uic 



U1D 



4jrji 



11 NVC 



Figure 2. 




fTH l > - 



5 



mi 

UIC 



TW4 ■>■ 



ia. 



iz. 



U1D 
AQZX 



A3_ 



£> 



USA 



PTT i > 



I.C. SUPPLY CONNECTIONS 
<NOT SHOWN ON SCHEMATICS, FOR CLARITY} 



X*C 



♦13 . SV 



4Q7JL 

1_> 



±- 1PTT-^> 



4069 


14 


7 


4071 


14 


7 


4Q7B 


14 


7 


4oei 


14 


7 


453S 


16 


1,8,15 



_2_ 



U2C 

aszx 



J ^y^sL^rr- 



12. 



U2D 

.4071 



AS. 



O 



-"HPTT 4 > 



TO CALCULATE THE NUMBER OF 
USE THE FORMULA: 

G a NCN-2> 

MHERE N = # OF PORTS DESTRED* 
G = 4 OF GATES REQUIRED 
t SINCE THERE ARE 4 I.C. GATES 
PER I.C- PACKAGE, DIVIDE "G" 
BY 4 TO GIVE THE TOTAL NUMBER 

OF 4071 I*C,S REQUIRED 

OR SEE SCHEMATIC 4 ! 3 



AND; 



Figure 3. 



32 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



microphone, and so forth) becomes ac- 
tive, all but that one corresponding out- 
put become active. 

For my prototype, I used 4078 NOR 
gates and inverters (since we're dealing 
with positive logic) to simplify the 
wiring and to keep the parts count tow 
(see Figure 4), 

The final requirement is an audio 
combiner, shown in Figure 5. I've no- 
ticed some audio distortion in certain 
transceivers if the audio gain (volume) 
is set too low; therefore, I set the vol- 
umes of my transceivers at about the 
half-way point, and use boost/cut con- 
trol in the operational amplifiers in the 
combiner to set the volume controls. 

If you plan to be away from your link 
enough to make it a concern, a simple 
time-out timer 3 can be added in almost 
any convenient spot (for each transmit- 



ter, after each receiver that eliminates 
only the one receiver hung up due to 
noise, or at other convenient spots in the 
circuitry). 



1. "Midland 13-509 Modifications/' 73 Amateur 
Radio Today, December 1988, p, 27. 

2. "Ending Transmit Chatter," 73 

Amateur Radio Today, February 1991 , p. 27. 
3 „ pTT T j me _o utj " 73 Amateur Radio Today, 
August 1990, p. 82. 

Schematics by Klaus Spies WB9YBM 



Parts Sources 

1. Digi-Key Corporation 701 Brooks Ave. S, 
Thief 8iver Falls, MN P 56701; (800) 344- 
4539, fax: (218) 681-3380. 

2. Tri -State Electronics, 200 W. Northwest High- 
way* Mount Prospect, IL n G0056; (708) 255- 
0600, fax: (800) 255-0526. 



-13 .SV 

EH 



?& 






tuft 



+J3.#V 



R2 



■* 17. SV 

h-13,BV 



* — *W^-| hi?* 

3> LJ-J^oJ 



EH 



* l ■> . »v 



JCK 



1XH-S-> 



■> Lj»l 



UlE, 



* 13 . BV 



M. 



[>-. 



oh: 






■ IJ, .fiv 

HMJ 



IDK 



IDK tTZD 



INDIVIDUAL 

CCOl4TA«L > 
L.IHE5 



4QB1 



LJ.-.C 



U3D 

4aa i 




4063 



#,r« 




U5E OK RLL 4078 




2N2222 




— *1 LI* 



1 i m 

j +DTO 




Figure 4. 



ggn^HI 



Cl Rl 

4.7uF lOO 



C1D Rll 
4 . 7uF lOO 



C2 R2 

4 . 7uF lOO 



EKJL 



z^Hh 



HN"4-> -|[ 



C3 R3 

4 - 7uF AGO 



C4 R4 

4 * 7uF lOO 



nszszHf- 



C5 R5 

4 . 7uF lOO 



EHZE>Hf 



Cfe R6 

4 _ 7uF lOO 



UJNt ? > ^|[ 



G7 R7 

4 t 7uF J.OO 



EB3^-| 



CB RB 

4-7uF lOO 



H| n>n^*H2QTX> 




RX3 

IK 



+13., SV 



IOK 



RIO 
IOK 




Cll R12 

4.7uF iOO 



C12 Ri3 

4,7uF IOO 



l»-j| ^N^S^^ HOUT 4 > ■ 



6 

+13 ,5V 



C9 
lOuF 



I6UT 5 *> 



^vn* — fffPT~3 "> 



C13 R14 

4.7uF IOO 



CJL4 RJLS 
|4-7uF IOO 



CIS R16 

J.7uF IOO 



Ed=5Z> 



i-|| n^v — I6UT & *> 



C16 RI7 

.7uF J.OO 



h^[[— ^v^^- ratiT t^> 



CX7 RX8 

4.7uF IOO 



HI "^v^- loUT $T> 



Figure 5 



I 



I 







. ..... ..-. • 

. . , K : tWJSW^ ■ ?* ....^J.H»:^- 

... g ,.„ ..„,, 
j ^ ' - 

f^-gfefc** ■ 

,,,s. >; ^:^; ■;;-;.. . ■■;■ 

I**-.-- .-■;„:,,...■:•: ■*- 

. ■ ■-. ■■■ , ■..,-,, i v**s^■•■*'•"•■* 

. ., : . , ■. ... h ■• ■•■■■ ■ -;. ;^1^ :^:^'**^- 

«y ■■- ■■*:::,; :..... .. •■■— : 

; - K: *- v - H !^l^^^*---- : - - 






■■^^'■■■■■■■^-■• :: -- v " 

■ : -,, Mi ■ 














jy J^^JtLi* 



■IX 
tf+w^r ■ ■■■ ^ .. : -;...^:^-J 

1 ■ ■ ■ A™ "- . Jw. 




► what effect soil pH may 
have on grounding? 

► entrance panels are a last 
defense against lightning? 

► the facts & fallacies of 
oscilloscope sampling rates? 



F/?EF- join the more 

than 30,000 readers 

and learn from 

The Leader in Lightning 

& Grounding Solutions 



si 



CORPORATION 

(702)782-2511 
FAX: (702) 782-4476 
BBS: (702) 782-6728 

2225 Park Place «P.O. Box 9000 
Minden, NV 89423-9000 



CIRCLE 49 ON READER SEFMCE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 33 



Number 9 on your Feedback card 



Boring Beacons! 

Making additional use of beacon signals* 

by D. R. "Kuby" Kubichek N6JSX 



Amateur Radio has set aside 
dedicated portions of vari- 
ous bands for radio beacons 
which typically broadcast the oper- 
ator's callsign in CW on a low- 
power omnidirectional antenna. A 
beacon's only recognized purpose is 
to evaluate radio wave propagation 
on a specific frequency from a spe- 
cific location. But beacons can do 
double duty — being an RF source 



for monitoring propagation and al- 
so transmitting telemetry informa- 
tion. The beacon telemetry can be 
in the form of varying audio tones 
that can disseminate public safety 
information in the form of wind 
speed, seismic energy, or even area 
weather warnings! A beacon could 
even transmit Morse code practice. 
The Midwest and South have tor- 
nadoes, the East and Gulf Coast 



have hurricanes, and the West has 
earthquakes and volcanic activity as 
major natural threats. There is no 
reason why radio beacons can't 
transmit useful and possibly lifesav- 
ing information while they send 
their regular transmission. 

Until I built my Seismic beacon, I 
may have listened to beacons for a 
total of 15 minutes over 22 years of 
hamming. How many of these read- 



N6JSX Seisml 



Beacon 432-350 MHz 



Audio RF" TigKt Bcik 



; 




Cffophonff 

GS— 11D-1C 

A « S Kx. v«r*t . 



£000 i Shi X 
BufTmr 



CCG orti 



fcuOurskE-sr 



Audio VCO 



jLLaoal 



©0002 5ki i 



Trip Jk 



i 




k 



0*t*¥Ct ft 

D*l ay 



Tont 



CCA two 
BffuT52 - Skt 2" 



JLlidl2_ 



ton* 



Ti mar* 

& Switch 



eiJ Id 



&£=X2 



ludlB/tpnt 



T^L 



A23 H* 



VCC 



I 



fiutocodi 
ATS 

N&JSX/B 




f 



J 



^/--.ftttW.tC. 



* 



RIP 



12 VDC BATTERY 



ItoPol* 
Ant»nna 



^Z 



Tnntmltttr 
RF Tliht Bok 



£'ffOff3*~~P~A' 

JM57729 . 

|3£ uitti max* 

tfCC 
•Nominal 

;!□ ultti 



RC-1^4 



E 



Ha'ffrt r* oni cm 

TA451 

2 U*tt« i1UK< 



VCC 



Nominal 
1 watt 



« 



SP^IP 



H 

r* 

d 

1 

I 

n 



£ 



Figure 1. System Interconnect Diagram. 



34 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



U1C 




^ to IC3D pin 12 



to ft24 



NOTES! 

Rnlttdi 



In ohrfW 



13 _ S vcfc 



Figure 2. Geophone Buffer Amplifier. 



Volt-Bo* Controltd Dtcilator 



^^^ 



Arq»U1ud» Control 



U2 

XR220C 



zi: 



A 22 




^ 



xi€ — ' 



C2 

i PUT 



i 



S-ftTN SYM1 
SINE SVMJ 

LEVEL THDA 
1HD2 
+VCC CND 
CftP SOflW 
CAP 

FSTT2 r§F 







R2Q 
22 Q 



ACL 



C20 



^ 



1 



R24 
3 . 3K 



i 

< 



Cant no 1 Voltigf 
ti-om ICiB pin 7 



■*> „ Tom Pitch Cortisol 

2^K 



Buff 



I iricr 



^i^*^ 



Audio OUT 

H»m*POnici 

MIC IN - E2 



4 





■D- 




R28 

iOK iQT 



BEAD 



C24 

1. mf <J 



I 




MOTES r 

Rtiitiar 



in ohmi 




Figure J. Audio VCO and Buffer. 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 35 



RJSO 
iK 



Amplifier 

L.M324 



ft 



.01 mfd 









Manual Tr-ip 
T*#* 



R37 



(fcM 



3>* 



1 



K32 




C3t 

,Q1 mfd 



Thr»»Kold 
Tri^ Indicator 





TEST FO*Nt 

Thr»»hol <t T rl p 

VQlt*9» 

Crtom4n*l Z.EO V> 



D31 




* — *\A^V 1 



fiufftr ArvUfltr 
LT3E> 



from ICiC *I n 6 



> 



*3» 

IK IOT 

Tim* 0«tav 
Control 
0—2 **c . 



-^ -ftp icM pin 



4,00 nfd 




notes: 

li.** on *r-« In ohm 



Figure 4. Seismic Threshold Detect and Delay, 



Continued on page 38 



EE 1 -800-666-0908 

PRICING AND ORDERS ONLY 





FT-11R 

2mHEftdh«itj 



YAESU 

Discount Coupons 



FT-51R 

2flV44QMHz 

Handhold 




FT-9SC 

100W AlUBand Trtnsoorvo' 






FT-050C 

?rnM40MHz Mooito 








FT-5t00. ft-sho 
2rv44QMHZ Mot*** 



FT-900AT 

Compact HF Transceiver 

Remote Fnnt Pane* Des.gn 

VAESli DISCOUNT COUPONS 




FT-530 
2rv440MHz 



000071. JUNE 30ft 

SSO FT- 1 OOO, 1 OOO D S30 FT-S1 DO T 520G 

SSO FT-990, 900DC S25 ROTORS 

SSO FT-900AT. FT-8*0 $20 FT-1 1R.51R 

S5G FT-530 S20 FT-2500M, 2200 



CALL FOR /^L YAESU 



NEW EQUIPMENT PRICING AND ORDERS 1 -80G-66&O908 OUT Of ST ATE 
TECHNICAL USED GEAR, INFO 203-666-6227 24HR FAX 203-667-3561 



LENTINI 

COMMUNICATIONS INC. 

21 GARFIELD STREET, NEWINGTON, CT06111 



M-F10-6. 

SAT 104 





Same Day C.O.D.s 
J Shipping 



CIRCLE 234 ON READER SERVICE CARP 



V 



ir§ Ml Kenwood* TM-741 A 9 or TM-142A® UPGRADES 



ft m M Tne RC-740X Band Unit Expansion Box 



The RC-?40Xha$ been designed to accommodate those Hams 
who require more capacity for their dollar. With it, you may install 
up to four additional units, This allows you the option of having all 

six bands, either mobile or at 
your base station. No longer 
must you decide which upgrade 
band units you will do without 
Purchase any or all four of them. 
The RC-740X has been 
designed with the Ham in mind, 
allowing you to install it without 
modification to your Kenwood 
radio. Simply follow the clear 
instructional guide and you will 
be up and ready for that elusive 
QSO. 




Size: r (H) x 6* (W) x 5J5 (D) 
Puwer: 13.B VDC / 100 ma minimum 
Capacity; Four Kenwood band units: 
28 MHi, 50 MHz, 220 MHz t t20Q MHz 
Empty Weight: 2 lbs. 
Remote Mount Compatible 
Compammty: Kenwood *74t A 
•742k *$41A *642A *942A 



$ 



399 




PIusuleA 



CALL (800) 560-7234 

• AVAILABLE AT HAM RADIO OUTLET • 

R ^l * C * T Tech Support (619) 560-7008; 

* X-. 3 1 t0am-4:30pfn PST 

Radio Control Systems, Inc. visa. wasierCara 

6125-G Ronson Road, San Diego, CA 92111 UPS COD 



36 73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 



YOU ASKED FOR it WE'VE GOT IT 

SPECTRUM ANALYZER SCOPE ADAPTER 




1 MHz TO 500MHz 
SPECTRUM 
ANALYZER 




100% FACTORY ASSEMBLED NOT A KIT 



MUST FOR EVERY SHOP: 

he SA500ADP Spectrum Analyzer Scope 
dapter works with any Scope Just one 
>nnection to the Vertical & Trigger Inputs 
ad any scope becomes a fell function 
pectrum Analyzer. Tune HT.'s Filters, 

Qxers. Check all RF based Systems. The 
A500ADP Scope Adapter will compliment 



any Ham Shack, Radio Service Shop or 
EMI Test Lab.. MADE IN THE USA Not 
a kit. If you have been waiting for a low cost 
High performance Spectrum Analyzer at an 
affordable price , take Advantage of our 
special introductory offer. Add a 500MHz 
Tracking/Noise Generator for only $100 
and save a total of $200. 



AS SEEN ON YOUR SCOPE 

MADE IN THE USA 

SA500ADP only $399.00 

Add Tracking Gen. $1 00.00 
Introductory offer only 

$499.00 

SAVE OVER $200 Reg. price $699 



: : ,. : . . Jfe^HnHHHHHMM|^nnsn§l|SHfl2MM 




SETTING THE STANDARD 



SA500A, SA1300B, SA1800C 



SPECTRUM ANALYZERS 



STARTING AT $995.00 



Model SA130GB 



1-1300 MHz In One Sweep 



MADE IN THE USA 

6" x 1 2"x 1 6 ,r (H x W x D ) (only 1 6 LB) 
SA1TOC Shown $2395.00 

3? 1 «J«lt)«tftJ Options 1.3.5 6 



SPECTRUM DISPLAY MONITOR $995.00 

The SA500A easily attaches to any receiver IF output jack. Providing 
a panoramic signal display of your scanner or communication receiver. 



TWO FULL FUNCTION ANALYZERS 

Quality & Performance with 80dB on Screen, -100 dBm Sensitivity, 
Center Freq. Display, +/- 5KHz Narrow Band Filter 50 MHz Marker. 



The SA500A is a Full Function Spectrum Analyzer with +/- 5KHz DISPERSION ZOOM, Baseline Clipper, Adjustable Sweep Speed, 
Narrow Band Filter, Center Freq. Display, 50 MFIz Marker. SA50OA 
The first affordable Professional Spectrum Monitor/Analyzer for all 



serious Ham Radio and Radio Monitoring Operators. With Opt, 1,3,5,6 



Video Filter, and 40dB Input Attenuation. SA1300B 1 -1300MHz 
SA1800C 1-1300 &85(M850MHz §23«){) With Opt 1,3,5,6 



ADVANTAGE INSTRUMENTS CORP. MC -VISA - DISCOVER call 800-566 1818 

3579 Hwy. 50 East Carson City, Nevada 89701 702-S85-0234 FAX 702-885-7600 

PRICES & SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOHCE OR OBLIGATION. F,0 + B. CARSON CITY NV. NV. RESIDENTS ADD SALES TAX. 

CIRCLE 149 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



C50 



1QCJ pnfd 



from C33 



> 



I 



W 



Timing Control 
0—45 *#c« 



'S^V"^ 

RSG T 4 



VCC 



47QK 



+V S VD 



U4A 



.&. 



Rftrlg Henottabli Huitivib 
T Lmmr 



JUL 



4S3B 






vcc 

t 



RSI 
3*3K 



^^%^ 



Cnttn 



S 



U53 



OS a 

PL EmbU 



-^ PL Tort* In 



USA 



V£C 
14 






BEAD 




> 



PL Ton* Out 



to HTmtronici 
R1S ylp*r 



USD 



Figure 5. Timer and Switching. 



Continued on page 40 



ID-8 Automatic Morse Station Identifier 

Compatible with Commercial Public Safety, and Amateur Radio 
applications. Uses include Repeater Identifiers, Base Station Identifiers, 
Beacons, CW Memory Keyers, etc. Great for RC.C. 10 Compliance. 

• Miniature in size. * 85"x 1,12"xQ 35" 

• Totally RF Immune. 

• A3I connections made with micnonmniatuTe plug and socket with color coded wfres attached. 

• CMOS microprocessor (or lew voltage, low current operation: 6 to 20 VDC unregulated at 6ma. 

• Low distortion, low impedance, adjustable sinewave output: to 4 volts peak to peak. 

• Crystal controlled lor high accuracy. 

• Transmitter PTT outout (tD key transmitter white ID is being sent), is an open collector 
transistor that will handle SO V DC at 3Q0ma. 

• Field program Table with SUPPLIED keyboard. 

• Confirmation tone to indicate accepted parameter plus tones to indicate programming error, 

• All programming & stored in a nonvolatile EEPftOM which may be ailered at any time. 

• Message lengih over 200 characters long. 

• Trigger ID with active high or low. 

• Inhibit ID with active high or low. Will hold oft ID until channel is clear of traffic. 

• Generates repeater courtesy tone at end of user transmission if enabled, 

• Double sided tape and mounting hardware supplied for quick mounting. 

• Operating temperature range. -3D degrees C to +65 degrees C. 

• Full one year warranty when returned to the factory for repair. 

• Immediate one day delivery. 

Programmable Features 

• Eight programmable, selectable, messages. 

• CW speed torn 7 to 99 WPM. 

• tD interval timer from h99 minutes. 

• ID hold off timer from 0-99 seconds. 

• CW tone frequency from Iffl hi to 3000 hi. 

• Front porch tfeigy intensf from to 9.9 seconds 

• CW or MCW operation. 

$89.95 each 

programming keyboard included 

COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS, INC. 

426 WEST TAFT AVENUE • ORANGE, CA 92665 420% 
(7Uj 998-3021 * FAX $714} 974&42Q 
Entire U.S.A. (800) 854 054? * FAX (800) 9 50 0547 





CIRCLE 10 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Attention Repeater Owners 

Finally a repeater controller with a 77 voice synthesizer and full 

feature autopatch incredibly priced at $299.00. 



Features Include; 
y Voice Synthesizer 
y (412) Word Vocabulary 
y Twelve Voice Messages 
y Two Voice Identifiers 
y CW Identifier 
SFull Feature Autopatch 
y User Speed Dials 
y Emergency Speed Dials 
y Reverse A utopatch 
yDTMF Key Pad Test 
yDTMF Repeater Access 
yDTMF Repeater Muting 
y (56) Control Functions 
y Remote Control Switches 
y Hardware Logic Inputs 
yUVR Controller Ready * 




y Female Voice <& Sound Effects 
y Programmable Courtesy Tones 
y Programmable Codes and Timers 



* (Requires MF-1Q0Q Serial Interface Card $59.00) 

Write or Call for a brochure describing the CAT- 300 Controller, 
including schematic, voice word list, and control Junctions. 

CAT-300 Controller Board $299.00 Wired and Tested 



Computer Automation Technology, Inc. 

4631 N.W. 3lsr Avenue, Situe 142 t Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 

(305) 978-6171 



CIRCLE 26S ON READER SERVICE CARD 



38 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



ORDER NOW 1-800 4 HOBBY KITS 




AIRCRAFT RECEIVER 



Hear exciting air-craft 
communications- 
pick up planes up to 
100 miles away! 
Receives 110-136 
MHz AM air band, smooth var actor tuning superset with 
AGC 1 ceramic filler, adjustable squelch, excellent 
sensitivity and lots of speaker volume. Runs on 9V 
battery. Great for air shows or just hanging around ihe 
airpcrtl New 30-page manual details pilot talk, too, Add 
case set for "pro" look. 
AR- 1 kit... $29.95 Matchin g ca se set , C AR . . $1 4.9S 



FM RECEIVERS & TRANSMITTER 



Keep an ear on the local repeater, police, weatner or just 
tune around. These sensitive supemet receivers are fun to 
build and use, Tunes any 5 MHz portion of the band and 
have smooth varactor tuning with AFC, dual conversion, 
ceramic filtering, squelch and plenty of speaker volume. 
Complete manual details how the rigs work and 
applications. 2M FM transmitter has 5W RF out, crystal 
control (146,52 included J, pro-specs and data/mike inputs. 
Add our case sets lor a nice finish. 
FM Receiver kit Specify band: FR-146 (2M), FR-6 (6M), 

FR-lO(lOM),FR-220 (220MHz) $34*95 

CFR Matching case set .,.„ , ,.. . $14*95 

FT-146 Two Meter FhA transmitter kil $99.95 



SYNTHESIZED AUDIO GENERATOR 



1 DDS (Direct Digital Synthesis) 

iin. . technology brings you a terrific audio 

u ■• generator at a fantastic price! 

f\ p\ Generates from 0, 01 Hi to 50 KHz with 

TTT five digit LED display of frequerrcy, Sine 

. ^ ^' and square wave output adjustable 0-5 

volt p-p. Frequency selected by direct keyboard entry and 

with handy continuous tune tuning knob. Crystal controlled 

accuracy of 10 ppm and two memories for rapid frequency 

changes. Retire that jury-rigged old generator and treat 

yourself to the pleasure of using a new state-of-the-art SG- 

550' 

SG^550 Kit ..SI 99.95 SG-550WT assembled $269,95 



MICRO-MIKE 



World's smallest FM wireless 

mike. Smaller than a sugur cube 

- including battery and mike. Two 

sets of SMT parts supplied in 

case you are clumsy! Terrific 

audio pick-up (pin drop at 5 ft) and transmit range of 300 ft, 

We include the battery (watch style), electret mike and 

even a luring toot! Be a James Bond and learn SMT too! 

FM-5 Micro mike kit ...S19,95 




FM WIRELESS MIKES 



Pick the unit trial's right for you. All units transmit a stable 
signal in the 68-108 MHz FM band up to 300' except for 
High power FM-4 and PB-1 Phone bug that go up to 1/2 
mile, 

FM-1 Basic unit SS.95 

FM~2 F as above 

but with added mike pre amp $7,95 

FM-4 i long range with 

very sensitive audio pickup ♦>..< S14«95 

PB-1, Phone bug needs no battery, 

hooks to phone Jine , . 514.95 

MC-1 , Micro size sensitive mike cartridge 

forFM-1,2,4 $2.95 




SHORTWAVE RECEIVER 



Fantastic receiver that captures Ihe 

world with just a 12" antenna^ Can 

receive any 2 MHz portion from 4-11 L 

MHi. True superhet. has smooth |#'^^~^.'' "^ 

varactor tuning, AGC, RF gain 

control, plenty of speaker volume and runs on a 9V battery. 

Fascinating Scout, school or club project, provides hours of 

fun for even the most serious DXer. For the car, consider our 

shortwave converter. Two swilchable bands (in 3-22 MHz 

range}, each 1 MHz wide — tunable on your car radio dial. Add 

some interest to your drive home! 

Shortwave receiver kit, SR1 -,S29,95 

Shortwave converter kit SC1 $27.95 

Matching case set for SRI , CSR ..,,$14.95 

Matching case set for SCI, CSC $14.95 



AM TRANSMITTER 



High quality, true AM broadcast band transmitter is designed 
e^acUy like the big commercial rigs. Power of 100 rnW, legal 
range of up to 1/4 mile. Accepts line level inputs from tape 
and CD players and mike mixers, tunable 550-1750 KHz. 
Complete manual explains circuitry, help with FCC regs and 
even antenna ideas. Be your own Rush Limbaugh or Rick 
Dees with the AM-! ! Add our case set for a true station look. 

AM-1 Transmitter kit ..,$29,95 

CAM Matching case set $14,95 




SCANNER CONVERTER 



f urw in on the S0G-95Q MHz action using 

your existing scanner. Frequencies are 

converted wfth crystal referenced stabilty 

to the 40D-550 MHz range. Instructions 

are even included on building high 

performance 900 MHz antennas. Welt dssigned circuit features 

extensive filtering and convenient on-ofJ/bypass. switch. Easy 

one hour assembly or available fully assembled. Add our 

matching case set for a professional look. 

SON- 1 Scanner co n verter kit ... $49,95 

SCN Matching case set $14.95 

SCN-1WT Assembled SCN-1 and case $89.95 



SURROUND-SOUND/REVERB 



Add concert hall realism to your stereo, TV or even 2-way radio! Easily syihesize a stereo effect from mono sources or richly 
enliven regular music. Add a big -voice reverb to your radio voice tfiat others will envy! Our reverb/surround sound kit uses a 
Bucket Brigade IC Device for reliable solid-state performance. Adjustable reverb, delay and mix controls to customize your 
sound. Easily connected to radios, stereos, CB's and TV's, Plentty of audio to drive a small speaker lor stand-alone 
operation too> Experience the fun and realism that surround sound provides - without spending hundreds! Add our case set 
for a neat, pro look. 

RV-1 Surround Sound/Reverb kit S59-95 CRV Matching case set $14.95 

RV-1WT Assembled RV- 1 and case , „....„. SS&.fiS 



TOUCH-TONE REMOTE CONTROL 



Control virtually anything by Touch-Tone remote control. The URG-1 has 16 switched outputs, 4 adjustable voltage outputs 
(20 mV steps to 5 VDC), two 10K digital pots (for volume, squeteh, etc) and 3 limers adjustable from 10 mS to 40 hours! 
Two level password control allows secure control and multi-level access. Six digit LEO display shows currently entered 
codes and a crystal controlled touch-tone decoder provides reliable operation. There's nothing else like this unit, be in 
complete control of remote radios, thermostats, hi-fi h s, homes or even factories with the URC-1, Add our matching case set 
for a handsome finish. 

URC-1 Remote control kit - r „„S1 29.95 CURC Matching case set , ...$14.95 

URC-1WT Fully assembled URC-1 and case $189,95 



FM SUBCARRIER DECODER 



Tap into the world of commercial-free music and data that is carried over many standard FM broadcast radio stations. 
Decoder hooks to the demodulator of FM radio and tunes the 50-100 KHz SCA subcarrier band. Many radios have a 
demod output, but if your radio doesn't, it's easy to locate, or use our FR-1 FM receiver kit which is a complete FM radio 
with a demod. jack built-in. These "hidden" subcarriers carry lots of neat programming - from stock quotes to news to 
music, from rock to easy listening - all commercial free. Hear what you've been missing with the SCA-1. 

SCA-1 Decoder kit , 327*95 CSCA Matching case set $14.05 

FFM FM receiver kit $24.95 CFR Matching case for FR-1 S14>95 



L-C METER 



Measure inductors from 10 uH "lOmH and capacitors from 2 pF*2uF with high accuracy by connecting the LC-1 to any 
digital multimeter, Two pushbutton ranges for high resolution readings and we even give you calibration components to 
assure proper accuracy of your kit! Active filters and switching supplies require chticai values, no one should be without 
an accurate LC meter. For a pro look, add our matching case set. 
LC-1 LC meter kit... 334,95 CLC case set... $14.95 






STEREO FM TRANSMITTER 



Run your own Stereo FM radio station! Transmits a stable signal 
in the 88-1 OS MHz FM broadcast band up to 1 mile. Detailed 
manual provides helpful info on FCC regs, antenna ideas and 
range to expect Latest design features adjustable line level 
inputs, pre^emphasis and crystal controlled subcarrier. Connects ; 
to any CD or tape player, mike mixer or radio. Includes tree 
tuning tool tool For a pro look add our matching case set with on- 
board whip antenna 

FM-10A Stereo transmitter kit „„,„.„.„„„ .534.95 

CFM Case.whip ant set 514,95 




DR. NI-CAD CONDITIONERS AST CHARGER 



Quit spending big bucks for replacement battery packs, rejuvenate and condition your 
batteries for peak capacity. Advanced circuitry has optimized discharge before charge to 
eliminate memory effect and to condition batteries that have been poorly cared for in the 
past. Quick charge rapidly brings battery to full charge in less then an hour-just 15 
minutes for some types! And "top- off charge mode squeezes every last bit of energy 
into each cell for the absolute most capacity. Switch-mode regulator controls constant 
current charge while being monitored by a negative delta- V system that cuts ofl the last 
charge at the exact point ot full charge-batteries are charged, not cooked! Charges 
MiCads or NiMH packs from 2 to 10 celts (easily expanded) and current capacities up to 
10 Amp-hours. Runs on 12 to 15 V DC. Quit cooking your batteries, buying new packs, 
waiting hours for recharge, get a Dr. Ni-Cad today! Available in money saving kit form or 
wired and lested with case at a special price. Kit builders: add our matching case set for 
a snazzy finish, 

DN-1 Dr\ Ni-Cad conditioner/fast charger kit $49.95 

CDN Matching case set S14.95 

DN-1WT Fully assembled Dr. Ni-Cad with case S89.95 



****** 



SPEED RADAR 



New low-cost microwave Doppler radar kit "clocks" cars, planes, boats 1 horses, bikes or any 
large moving object. Operates at 2.6 GHz with up to 1/4 mile range. LEO 
digital readout displays speed in miles per hour, kilometers per hour or 
leet per second! Earphone output allows for listening to actual Doppler 
shift. Uses two Mb coffee cans for antenna (not included) and runs on 12 
A VDC. Easy to build— all microwave circuitry is PC striptine. ASS plasty 
case with speedy graphics for a professional look, A very useful and full- 
of-fun kit. 
SG-7 Complete kit $99,95 



STEREO PEAK HOLD BARGRAPH 



Finally a dual LED bar graph with a peak hold display! Bar graph displays are neat and eye 
catching but their speed is their downfall - they jusl can't capture the peaks. Our kit is like 
two units in one h a fast display to show the signal and a long; persistence display to capture 
peaks, similar units go lor hundreds of bucks! We offer 3 models: Linear lor general use, 
Semi- Log tor audio VU meters, and Log far power displays. Dual - for stereo! - 10 segment 
multi-colored LED display for snazzy, eye grabbing display and easily set ranges tor 
virtually any signals, from voltmeters to audio VU meters to audio power amps to SWR 
meters. Complete inductions for easy hook-up to most any device. Add our matching case 
set lor a sharp looking unit. 

PH-14 Dual Linear bargraph kit S39.95 PI+15 Dual Log bargraph kil ..539.95 

PH-1 6 Dual Se mi-Log ba*g raph kit S39.95 C PH M atchtng case set S 1 4.95 



SPEECH SCRAMBLER 



Descramole most scramble systems heard 
on your scanner radio or set up your own 
scam bled communication system over the 
phone or radio. Latest 3rd generation IC Is 
used for fantastic audio quality ■ equivalent 
to over 30 op-amps and mixers! Crystal 
controlled for crystal clear sound with a built- 
in 2 watt audio amp for direct radio hook-up. 
For scramble systems, each user has a unit 
for full duplex operation. Communicate in 
privacy with the SS-70 Add our case set for 
a fine professional finish. 
SS-70 Scrambler /descramblerkit .539. 95 

CSSD matching case set $14.95 

SS-70WT Assembled 

SS-70 and case set S7&.95 



CRYSTAL 

RADtO 



Relive the radio past with a crystal set 
like your grandfather buirl. Uses genuine 
Galena crystal and calwhteker. Several 
different types of radios are built, 
including standard AM broadcast, 
shortwave and even WW II foxhole 
style. To compare modern semicorv 
ductor detectors, we include a diode tor 
comparison. No soldering required and 
we even give antenna ideas. Radio tor 
free, get it now before Clinton taxes it! 

CS-1 Crystal set kit $19.95 



TOUCH-TONE DECODER 



Grab Touch-Tone numbers right off the air, phone or tape. A simple hook-up to any radio 
speaker or phone line is all that is required to instantly decipher touch-tone phone 
numbers or codes. A 256 digit memory stores decoded numbers and keeps its memory 
even in the event of power ioss^ An 8 digit LED display allows you to scroll through the 
mem ory bank to examine numbers. To make it easy to pick out number groups or codes, 
a *dash M is inserted between sets of digits that were decoded more than 2 seconds apart. 
A "central-office" quality crystal controlled decoder is used allowing rapid and reliable 
detection of numbers at up to 20 digits per second! For a professionally finished look, 
add our matching case set. Start cracking those secret codes tomorrow with (he Tone 
Grabbed 

TG-1 Tone Grabber kit $99.95 CTG Matching case set„„...-$l4.95 

TG-1 WT Fully assembled TG-1 and case.... S149»95 



DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER 



Chatterbox digital voice storage unit will record your message of up to 20 seconds. 
Time is split up into four 5 second blocks which can be played separately or 
cascaded for longer messages. An LED display shows message location and 
current mode for easy operation. Nifty built-in interfaces allow simple connection to 
transmitters tor automatic keying when the PTT is initially closed or after it is 
released. You can even loop your rig's mike through the Chatterbox. For contest or 
fun use h the CB-1 can drive an external speaker. Includes a built-in electret mike. 
For that finishing touch, add our matching case set. 
CB-1 Voice recorder kit.. $59.95 CCB Matching case set 514,95 



MOTOR CONTROLLER 



Control the speed and direction of any motor. Use our SMD-1 for those nice steppers you 
see surplus, and our MSC-1 for DC motors. The stepper driver features variable speed h half 
step rotation, direction and power down mode, can drive most any stepper motor. Our DC 
driver features pulse width modulation control allowing full motor torque even at 
low speeds and can drive motors up to 50 VDC ft 10 Amps! Add our case set 
for a professional assembly. 
j^JJiSMD-1 Stepper kit ,.„. .$24.95 MSC-1 DC motor kit ..... $24.95 



ORDERS CALL 1-800-4 HOBBY KITS (446-2295) ORDERS ONLY 
TECH/ORDER/JNFO (716)924^4560 FAX (716)924-4555 




TERMS; Sal inaction guaranteed, Examine for 10 day*. If 10! pleased return in original form 
for refund. Add 54.95 for shipping, handling and insurance, For fa reign orders add 20% for 
surface maif. COO {U.S. only* add S5.00. Orders under 520 add $3.00 NY residents add f% 
sales tax. 90-day parts warranty on kit parts. 1 -year parts A labor warranty on wired units. 



CSMD SMD-1 oase $14,95 CMSC MSC-1 case. $14,95 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS, INC 793 CANNING PARKWAY VICTOR NY 14564 



CIRCLE 34 ON READER SE VICE CARD 



ers have ever listened to a beacon? 
How many of you can even copy 
the CW ID? Do you know where 
beacons are located and their oper- 
ating parameters? 

I built my Amateur Radio Beacon 
primarily as a radio seismometer 
that runs at 2 to 10 watts covering 
the Los Angeles area on 432.350 
megahertz, and this beacon could 
be used for propagation eval- 
uation. My ID cycle is set for ~ ~ 
a 9. 5 -minute intervals, but 
the beacon transmits a con- 
stant tone near 680 hertz that 
varies proportionally to any 
amount of seismic energy 
sensed by a geophone sensor. 
The sensor is so sensitive I i 
could distinguish between a 
loaded or an unloaded train moving 
three-fourths of a mile north of my 
home. 

When seismic energy is detected 
that exceeds a preset threshold, a 
subaudible tone is injected onto the 
beacon's signal. (This optional sub- 



All 



audible tone was added to reduce 
the detection in the listener's cir- 
cuitry.) Threshold level appears to 
indicate events equal to or greater 
than 3.0 on the Richter scale in my 
local area. Event threshold detec- 
tion is typically T + to 2 seconds 
of delay. 

Some Los Angeles VHF and 
UHF repeaters have expressed an 



"Many small earthquakes 
over a short period of time 
seismic swarms) can indicate 
increased probability of a large, 
pending earthquake. 




j* 



interest in monitoring this type of 
beacon* With an auxiliary receiver 
at the repeater site that could detect 
the subaudible tone, the repeater 
could either sound a warning tone 
or retransmit the beacon's audio. 
The repeater users would get some 



amount of seismic warning. 

This beacon only reacts to actual 
released seismic energy and is not 
per se a prediction device. Howev- 
er, if a quake slowly starts releasing 
energy before the major shock, the 
beacon could give listeners some 
forewarning. Many small earth- 
quakes over a short period of time 
(called seismic swarms) can indi- 
cate an increased probability 
~ ~ of a large, pending earth- 
quake. Listeners can monitor 
and judge for themselves how 
they want to react to the seis- 
mic activity. Mobile users 
could make a quick decision 
whether to travel under the 

next freeway overpass or pull 

to the shoulder. I personally 
consider any amount of earthquake 
forewarning better than no warn- 
ing! 

Amateurs who live in earthquake- 
prone areas could create an over- 
lapping network of seismic bea- 
cons. I hope that sharing my beacon 



the. 




HAM STATION 

P.O. Box 6522 

220 N. Fulton Avenue 

Evansville, IN 47719-0522 

Store Hours 

MON-FRI: SAM - 5PM 

SAT: 9AM - 3PM 

CENTRAL TIME 

SEND $1 .00 FOR NEW AMD USED 
EQUIPMENT SHEETS 

WARRANTY SERVICE CENTER 

FOR SERVtCE INFORMATION CALL 

(812)422*0252 

MONDAY -FRIDAY 



TEH MS: 

Prices Do Not Include Shipping. 

Price and Aval lab lily Subject to 

Change Without Malice 

Most Orders Shipped The Same Day 

CODs Welcome 





KENWOOD 



Explore the KENWOOD DIMENSION 



TH-79A(D) 

2M/440MHz 
Handheld 




TH-22AT fl 
2 Meter E 
Handheld 



i 



TM-241A 2 Meter Mobile 




TS^450AT HF Base With DDS 



LARGE 

SELECTION OF 

USED GEAR 

TELEPHONE 

OR USE 

BBS 812-424-3614 



TS-50S Super Compact HF 




ORDERS & PRICE CHECKS 

800-729-4373 

NATIONWIDE & CANADA 



TS-S50AT Full Featured HF 



LOCAL INFORMATION 



812-422-0231 



FAX 812-422-4253 



CIRCLE 131 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



40 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



DUPLEXERS 



• QUALITY • SERVICE 

• PRICE 

WE'VE GOT IT ALL! 

Our Bandpass- Reject J ^ 
Duplexers with our 
patented BLB r 
Circuit" Filters 
provide superior 
performance. . . 
especially at 
close frequency 
separation. 




PHONE 817-8484435 
FAX 817-8484209 




PRODUCTS, INC. 

P.O. BOX 21145 • WACO, TX 76702 



n.e "ZAPPER U" 




With it's new and improved design 
it will not only test your radar 
detector.,. BUT it's tuned to the 
amateur radio band. 

• While out on Americas highways 
personally test yours and your 
fellow travelers radar detectors. 

The "ZAPPER II" is a 10.450 GHz 
to 1 0.550 CW oscillator. It has a 
code key jack installed for those 
who want to send Morse code. 



Built & tuned only 



$>1Q95 



49 



TRANSEL 




TECHNOLOGIES 

MADE IN USA 

1 23 East South Street 
Harveys burg, Oh 45032 

1-800-829-8321 



CIRCLE 11 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




"Smart 
Battery 
Charger 

JUN 87 QST 

BY WARREN DION N1B8H 

FOR GEL-CELLS or LEAD ACID BATTERIES. 
Features: Precision temperature tracking voftage 
reference & three mode charging sequence. 
Standard kit is for 12V @ 1/2 or 1 Amp, user 
selectable. Can be connected to the battery 
indefinitely, will not overcharge, Weighs 2 pounds 
and measures 4 ir W x 5:14*0 x 2Vi"H. Finfshed 
enclosure included in kft. 

Complete Kit Only $59.95 

Assembled & Tested $79.95 

CA Residents add 7.75% sales tax. S&H: $5.00 

(insumd). Foreign orders add 20%. Formosa info 

or price list; send legal size SASE (550) to: 





A&A Engineering 




2521 W. La Palma #K * Anaheim, CA 92B01 
(714) 952-21 14 - FAX: (714) 953-3280 



Chassis Kits Rack Shelves 

Cabinet Kits Rack Equipment 

Assembled Cabinets Antenna Grounding Kits 

Slops Box Kits Tower Mounted Box Kits 

UHF & VHF Antenna Dipole Hangers 

Power Divider Kits Other Enclosures 

Small sheets Aluminum and Brass 
UHF / VHF Antenna Parts 

Charles Byers K3IWK 
5120 Harmony Grove Road • Dover, PA 17315 

Phone 717 -292-4901 

Between 6PM and 9:30PM EST. Eves. 



CIRCLE 222 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Sell your products in 73 Amateur Radio Today. 

Call (800) 274-7373. 



Sirio has designed the new HI 
PERFORMANCE line Lor the discriminating 
Radio Amateur, These antennas are the very 
bust available in terms or material quality, hi- 
tech design and maximum performance* The 
result of years of experience and technological 
research by Sirio! All models are fabricated 
with the very best materials available to 
guarantee maximum strength and best 
performance. Year after year, Sirio whips are 
very flexible and incorporate a custom 
inclination system that allows them to be tilted 
to 90° without the use of keys or special tools* 



i i 





mm 




EDUO, 

\.t' 



Electronic Distributors 
325 Mill St* 
Vienna, Va, 221 SO 
PH 703-938-8105 




An innovative approach has been taken in 
the construction of the base impedance 
matching transformers* This new process 
results in very high and previously 
unattainable unit to unit precision. 
Particular attention has also heen paid to 
the UHF male antenna mounting 
connector which uses a gold-plated center 
pin, "TEFLON^ 11 insulation and a rubber 
weather seal for hi-performance and 
protection from the elements* All Sirio 
HP Antennas are factory adjusted and no 
additional tuning is normally required. 



1. Hi Quality 17/7PH 
stainless steel whip. 
2* Til table section with 
rubber gasket and 
stainless steel retention 
spring 

3, Dielectric low-loss 
"ZYTEL" insulator with 
brass insert soldered at 
the coil 

4, High "Q" air wound 
coil for Iow t dielectric loss 
5- High voltage ceramic 
capacitor for a perfect 
impedance matching 

6. Gold plated brass 
center pin with low 
dielectric loss "TEFLON 
insulator 

7. Silicone rubbergaskel 
and O-Ring for a perfect 
waterproofing 



I'.xclusivi: l)i<tii thtitipt't |i>r N*irlh & Sih. America 



CIRCLE 47 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 41 



fr 



from H»mtrontci 
jJL RF Output 



ClOO 
XO mfd 



R103 
iOO 2H Lin 

Powtr Control 




Riao 

55 IN 
A^V — 



RIOl 
ISO 1^2M 




RID2 

ISO I/2H 



db €0 ohm ittfriUBtor 
2 H in SOC mM out 



Pouir Amplifier* 
MS7723 



>IN 



I 



OUT 




CiOi 
.0047 mTd 



LiOO 
* 22 mH 




cioc 

5£Q pf 



3. 



— ^r 



CiO? 
? Pf 



X^ 




C104 
-O047 mfd 



-x 




CLOS 
-QQ47 mfd 




C102 
.0047 mfd 



It 



L102 
.22 mH 



Ci03 
10 mfd 




DlOO 
16V 



LiOi 
-22 mH 



I 



K 




to Airt*nni 



TWP* N 

Cor>n«:top 



{} 



wee 

3 



BEAD 



Figure fc 4 J0 M//z Power Amplifier. 






■ 
■ 



• 



wiimi^mitm^M^ 







..... ...;... 

•:•>.< > •: >x >:•• 
:•**•>'■: +x*x •> 

a *. .• : v .;. '.' .-. 



>>X*X^X;» 

: .- . .- ■. :• 
<*x*x<*>x 
Sa >.• : 






\ > v .;. ■> a v a^> 



• : ■•• •••: « •< >■<*••'. ■ • ■ • • •• 

• *^ y*.4+Ai .• \ .•.-.•.• a-. .-A . a-. . •. . .• .> , 



< »> "■ W> ■ ^ > / ■•'. V / \\ ."A / ^ A V / ■. V ."^A .J A 



!&&>.« 



x-o-K-w-x-tv. 






< >X->a*S 




>•• > • 
<r.<i\<-> •: :• •.?•• ?> %>.-.>.• : .• •.'.- %>.%..•■. a-. 
<-x<->x*x< :• <*x **<••> <->x*x< > <vx«<<-> <■> «r\* *•:•>.«• •:•: >.< a-; >:■.**•: «v^v -.va*- :jv/,*ax« i+y-o-yx+x+x* 



iimffiiSI|ii|li#iii 

Start :wrtfri to 

:••..••:<< .:•. .• ■: : •.•; < ><■• •::•<■ •.<■•<••< <:•• < ?< :•<><: :•:< >.< >.>••:<.< > :*:• <>•:■><■:•.•.<> •. >•■:■•• < • .••:.• •.-. • •: :• :v •.:-.• <>•...••:/ v • > ^ < •. v ; . s% s • . . . . . .. •* • : 

• • • »• • • fc. rf • -J • "• • • * ••..•.-• -^ ...*.. ^ vy/ Vi 1 *. ■ - f •••••• ^ •••••••. ^ . . • •• ^ '.V. \ .• •• ^A ^A\ ^A . A*. A*. . ^ . .• '. .* ^f.* . . -J- . . ■ . 

l^iiiiipiiiiiliiiWiiilliiplii^iiilPI 

a-, f '. // •/> < > <*>.\ > •.•> :<•> <•><•> «•/< > < >\->\*> v> •. > •. » ••> • >: >> .•> .• . • • / • • • .• • / • v.- •.•yr> • v/ •.-> . • • .• • • .• • . v.f / > .'X-! / •. . ■•'.: .• v .■ :: .• . : . • . ^ . . . .. . . ...... 

"81 




£& 




<■> < >x+ a a . «> ja : .,a> A>^ ^.-. /.. .:...://-^.^^^:..A^ a.> /a <a, a «> ^va^ >.< ^ <a-<*x<-> <*s.<i- <■> <*.<**< :-x v x*>x 
*>.^ > •: > -.*••*> -: >.-!* • A ^ •: ^ *»••:- • :>•: > •»> ; • * m •' irf^~ < :•'■»• ' : v • > ' > • **• : > ■'- ^x*> •! > 



eseierrient 



•:•> <>:•■■>>■;>< 






^^^ 




^ ^* fr *'.%"> x •!■ x ^ v •* -> ■* •*• * -j* ^* •; •*•* •; *"^j *j ^ ¥ * *i ^ 

.■ \ •• a •,.•;.-..•.. % \ .■ •; I : . 

A,\VA\ A*. /A /AVX\ / ^ / VV 

■: .- \< .• \ .■ <: <•: •:':-X'>xx->x 



. < : ••■: .%< :;\ >:•.<■:«■> < > 



^Vjji; 









■HHIH 



KLAf. 




VA.VA\ A*. .• S V . • \ •• • ^ • •• 

Pax-, x :■.••.••.■ • ........ • 

f . . 



wiiai302aiiii 



3 



■•■.>i 















42 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



design will initiate an interest in 
other beacon operators to modify 
existing beacons or install their 
own beacon for public safety. One 
result would be that in the near fu- 
ture an amateur could go anywhere 
on the West Coast and monitor 
seismic activity. 

Construction 

When possible, I used estab- 
lished kits and circuits for this bea- 
con. Figure 1 shows the design of 
the system. The actual control in- 
terface has been omitted from this 
article as the beacon control opera- 
tor could control the beacon in 
many different ways. 

Removing the 432-MHz signal 
from the various power supply and 
signal lines can be quite a 
headache. Using ferrite beads, 
feed- through capacitors, shielded 
cables, and grounding methods, 
and experimenting with by-pass 
capacitors can minimize the RFI 
problem. There is no sure and fast 
method. However, the geophone 
amplifier, audio, ID, PL, and tim- 
ing circuits (Figures 2-7) cannot 
be in the same RF-tight box as the 
transmitter or power amplifier 
module! 

Adjustments 

The various circuit adjustments 
are rather straightforward. Adjust- 
ments are set for the best audio 
quality and your seismic energy 
sensitivity preference. The thresh- 
old trip point is set for the PL tone 
activation. The time delay adjust is 
to help eliminate false tripping of 
the PL tone activation. 

Hamtronics transmitters can run 
continuously at 2 watts of power 
but still get quite warm, so I 
recommend a small cooling fan. 
To eliminate this fan requirement, 
I run the Hamtronics transmitter 
at about 1 watt. The nearly 1-watt 
signal is further attenuated 
and used as an exciter into a S- 
AU4 PA brick. The power on the 
PA board is capable of 15 watts, 
but is set to run at a cool 10 watts. 
The power amplifier is an optional 
item, which is a matter of personal 
preference. 



Geophone Mounting Fixture 



Threaded Pipe End Cap 



Threaded Pipe 
(both ends) 



Large 3-lb. 
coffee can 



Geophone 



Cement tilled 



Two- Wire Shielded Cable 




■iir 






Threaded Pipe End Cap 



The total weight of the fixture is about 16 lbs. A small piece of foam 
rubber is placed in the bottom of the pipe. A wooden dowel is carefully 
measured and placed on top of the geophone to the top of the pipe end. 
The geophone is now firmly held in place. Silicon caulking is placed at 
the wire exit to make a moisture-tight fixture. 

(copyright) 1991 Kuby Kommunications, Rowland Hts., CA 



Figure 7. Geophone Mounting Fixture, 



N6JSX Seismic Beacon — Purchased Equipment List 



Hamtronics TA451 UHF Transmitter 12-VDC Kit $99.00 

Crystal 432.350 MHz $12.00 

Crystal Oven $30.00 

A16RF Tight Box $30.00 

Autocode ATS IDer 12-VDC Programmed N6JSX/B $79.50 

Communications Specialists SS-32 12VDC $29.95 

Oyo Geospace GS-11D-1C 4.5-Hz vert, geophone $56.00 

RF Parts Co. S-AU4 Power Amp 1 2VDC $75.00 
Unicom Electronics— various ICs & diodes 

XR-2206 Mono Function Gen $3.79 

4538 Prec Mono Multivib $0.69 

LM-324 Quad Op-Amp $0.33 

Norcon Engineering TD1 6 Controller 12-VDC Kit $44.95 



(716)392-9430 



(805) 497-4620 
(714)998-3021 
(713)939-9700 
(619)744-0728 
(818)341-8833 



(706) 664-781 7 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 43 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Senior Citizens Upgrade 



by Hal (Doc) Goodman W3UWH 



On October 29, 1 948, I received 
my ham license. A few years 
later I was able to earn my Gen- 
eral Class license. It was not until 
November 1 994 that I finally upgraded 
to Advanced Class and January 1995 
that I earned my Extra Class ticket. It 
took two tries 10 pass the code. The first 
time the arthritis in my hands slowed 
me down too much. 

Much to my surprise, my new Extra 
Class license arrived by mail within a 
week. Not only did I receive the usual 
wallet-sized license, but I also received 
a beautiful 5 by 7 inch copy suitable for 
framing, 

I immediately got on the — — 
phone to ARRL and made ar- 
rangements to get my volunteer 
examiner's credentials. Having 
studied the manual and an- 
swered all the questions, I 
mailed the packet back to the 
ARRL. They never told me, but 
I think I got all the questions __ 
right. Several weeks later, I re- 
ceived by mail my shiny new badge 
with its impressive red lettering identi- 
fying me as an Extra Class volunteer 
examiner. 

Since that time I have had the privi- 
lege of taking part, with a large group 
of volunteer examiners, in several test- 
ing sessions. And it is a privilege to be 
able to share in the joy when someone 
gets his or her first license on after 
much effort, is finally able to upgrade. 
At one session, while waiting for the 
testing to begin, I was able to help a 
newly minted Tech-plus make his first 
CW contact using the club station. I sat 
next to him and copied the incoming 
code with him so he could relax and not 
worry about missing anything. I helped 
him figure out what to reply with and 
when he should repeat things, such 
as RST and name. When it was all over, 
I felt like an old pro and he felt like 

44 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 



he was finally a real ham. 

At the last testing session I participat- 
ed in the testing of a 13-year-old boy 
who blew the lid off the exam. He got 
100% on his code lest and 100% on his 
written exam. This was not a Novice 
exam. He blew the lid off the Extra 
Class exam! 

In talking with other old hands like 
myself w r ho have reached retirement 
age and now have time to appreciate 
ham radio, 1 kept urging them to up- 
grade. I informed them of all the fun 
they could have as a volunteer examin- 
er. I told them how good it fell, when 
working the Maritime Net, to be able to 



"So, not being willing to let well 

enough alone or, in this case, 

badly enough alone, I pressed them 

about this 'crazy* idea of getting an 

automatic upgrade. 



w 



go down to 150 and find an open spot 
to run a phone patch without all the 
usual interference. The more 1 talked, 
the more they all seemed just to get qui- 
et and lose interest in the conversation. 
When I questioned them about why 
they weren't interested, their answers 
surprised me. 

They believe that after thirty, forty, 
fifty, or more years as hams w r ho have 
done things right and have no viola- 
lions, they ought automatically to be 
given an upgrade. Now you should un- 
derstand that these are hams who got 
Class "B" licenses or, in a few cases, 
General Class licenses before half the 
current hams were born. They, for the 
most part, have lived very successful 
lives both personally and professional- 
ly. They were not the type of people 
who had lost interest in life or their 
hobby. 



So, not being willing to let well 
enough alone or, in this case, badly 
enough alone, I pressed them about this 
"crazy" idea of getting an automatic up- 
grade. What they imally admitted was 
that they could not do the high-level 
math and did not feel they were still 
able to memorize well enough to pass 
either the Advanced or Extra exam. 
They felt they could handle a 20-wpm 
code test, but almost nothing could con- 
vince them that it was even worth trying 
the written. They were absolutely con- 
vinced that at their age they had no 
chance of passing. What is even more 
ironic is that most of these guys had lor- 
^_. gotten more radio and electron- 
ic theory than I will ever know. 
I explained to a couple of my 
close friends that I could show 
them how they could pass with- 
out having to learn the "new 
math/' I told them that if they 
agreed, I would spend only 10 
^_^ minutes a day with them for a 
few weeks and guarantee that 
they would gel all the math questions 
right without having to do any math. 
One friend finally said okay, and I gave 
him my copy of the Advanced Class li- 
cense preparation manual, However, ev- 
ery time I stopped by to visit him there 
was always something that needed do- 
ing — anything but work on the test. 

This is a shame. Here they w r erc, the 
very people who built ham radio, at a 
time in their lives when ham radio was 
their main method for socializing and 
keeping active, and they did not have all 
the privileges and opportunities that an 
upgrade could give them. 

Simply to give an automatic upgrade 
is unfair. So what I would like to pro- 
pose is a senior citizens upgrade exam. 
To qualify, a ham would have to be at 
least 60 years old and have been li- 
censed (General Class) for at least 25 
years. The exam would consist of ques- 



tions on radio etiquette, rules and regu- 
lations, basic radio theory (not nands 
and nors and polar coordinates), contri- 
butions of ham radio to public safety 
and well being, the history of ham ra- 
dio, and so forth. 

I am not suggesting that the test be so 
superficial and easy that it doesn't re- 
quire any study. It should be reasonably 
difficult enough that it allows the se- 
niors to feel as if they really earned the 
upgrade, such as through drawing 
schematics and designing circuits, The 
exam could be challenging without ask- 
ing them to do high-level math. 

I was talking to a Norwegian station a 
little while ago. He told me that in order 
for him to get his Extra Class license, 
which incidentally has more privileges 
than an American Extra Class, he had to 
pass a 12-wpm code test and a written 
exam that is the equivalent of our Gen- 
eral Class exam. 

This may sound like sour grapes; 
however, if the rest of the world is will- 
ing to give their hams a break, we could 
at least be more understanding of our 
own old-timers. Experience, etiquette, 
patience, understanding, and wisdom 
generally come with age. New math, 
however, is for youngsters. You will 
never be able to convince these "old 
dogs" that they can learn new math. 

What is needed is for us to start a 
campaign to benefit our senior hams. 
We should be exploring ways to cooper- 
ate with the FCC in designing a Senior 
Citizens Advanced Grade test. And if 
that works out, even an Extra Class ex- 
am that still requires 20-wpm code but 
does not require learning new math. 

As a VE S I am involved in administer- 
ing and scoring all levels of written tests 
as well as all levels of code proficiency. 
It would not be any burden to add one 
or two additional written tests. I am sure 
that my fellow VEs share my feeling. 
The sheer pleasure of seeing some old- 
timer upgrade is no less than watching a 
youngster getting his first license. 

The purpose of our hobby is not just 
enjoyment. We are here to perform 
public service in times of need. Who 
better to reward than those who have for 
years faithfully performed public ser- 
vices and helped ham radio gain its 
good reputation? 

I would like my fellow hams to start a 
dialogue. Write in, fax, get on the air, 
and discuss the idea of a senior citizen 
upgrade. If I am wrong and most hams 
don't favor the idea, so be it. If I am 
right, then let's get the ball rolling while 
many of our senior hams are still around 
to take advantage of the upgrade. 




"Receiving my Extra satisfied one of 
toy lifelong dreams! " BT Oklahoma City 

Thousands have used our scientific approach to get 
their tickets, FAST, Imagine yourself enjoying 
every aspect of Amateur radio I Surprise EVERY- 
ONE with your new power! Smash through 
stubborn plateaus like butter. Your amazing course 
now contains SIX cassettes, visual image cards and 
a technique jammed manual. Just £42:95 plus 
$5.95. p/h. to WARL, 38221 Desert Greens Dr. W. - 
Palm Desert, CA, 92260 or info 1-8UU-782-4&69. 
You can't lose! Follow the simple steps, YOU must 
succeed or return kit within 90 days for a no 
q ues rion s a s ked refu nd ! O rd er yo u rs to d a y. V/MC 
ASK FOR CODE QUICK #1P7"«:a add S3.i2T<*) 



"Dear Dr. Wheeler, "To my surprise, within 8 hiwrs I cnuld 

copy 10WPM! J jumped nn the air n sing your 5} stem and 

after another S hrmrs I found myself ai 17WPM, Nn plateaus! 

[ would highly re c ommend your product,.," ET Parker CO 




Factory Authorized Dealer & Service For 

KENWOOD 

YAESU 
ICOM 



Calf Us For 
Great Prices & Great Service 



TOLL FHEE ORDER LINE 1-800-344-3144 

Continental U $ $ TgidS 



THE 






U b ANTONIO Tfi*fl J 

STORE 



SAl £S AMATEUR RADIO Sl-RVicr 



5730 Mobud • San Antonio, TX 7S23S 
(210) 680-6110 FAX (21(1) 647-8007 



T J. Antenna Company 
Antennas for Hams by Hams 

Presents the #1 Band Mefdrfeed Romote tuned Mobile Antenna.,., 
The BROADBANDER SB3. 
Specifica tions : 

Freq. Range ... ,1.3 to 54 Mhz 

Power Handling . ,!■;„„,..„ 1500 Watts SSB 

Material ..Copper on Copper 

Coil-Q @ 3,aiWhz. 256 

\f& \j II IlIJ Jf^j 1IIIJ1 I^Ll q. 1 ILL1J ■ ■ L J J IILLJI LLJ ■■■ ■ L ■ ■ ■ III ■ ^T 

Coil Travel 1 r .19" 

Coil Travel Time „ < &0 sec. 

Coil Contacts Beryllium/Copper 

Impedance..., ,...6.33 otirns @ 3SMhz 

Motor. 20 in/bz @ 430 ftPM 

Weig ht ,„ . „§ „. 9. 5 I bs 

Length, j|„... 136 inches 

Diameter , ,., „..,. .2 inches 

T.J. Antenna Companion our a DO line to find out why 
gN^ea! the competition! Find out why we can money 
guarantee The STRONGEST MOBILE SIGNAL. 

OADBANDER 8B3.... $265.00 

METER COIL | 24,95 

fcflOmCONTRCji UNIT... 34.95 

30 day money back guarantee and 
lifts and materials. We accept Mastercard, 
and Checks. 

TJfeSVqter^a Company 

tst Place 3E 
.J Or, &M 
\ 0-443-0966 * SOS 

Tom/KA7W 

Prices aaii^ Decrftcaitions 




i 







ect 




HI-PERFORMANCE DIPOLES 



,.- 



f 



Zt^L^TT 



MPD-5 



-■■' 



ArftjmflE. Ihi1 WftfW Cliskitn aisarnblpd lo VOiir WJMfrr Jncq. en banj - 6MM5B W 0* cenler am wcti 
nnd - rung m, -Irwnitaa ~V -iHxiiwiiiii ™i dpohi. iknpckj dpon - cormKrcltil quaily ■ juirtoa 
li9udvniri> .Ipij.il JWVJC* - fHHrli|J hmln:iaiaciEy dgsilOT fN'r^i|iMUI«KA. MOccCOO iSD OtVl 

HPD-5' sa. AO. go. 15 1QM M.M-^PDrf&rmiinee Dipafc a7' &?&' long $ttO.0Q 

MPD-2' OT. ^OM Miipi-PgefdimftnjcDipcli? B5' tong ,..S65.W 105' fcng $72:00 

WPB-p?lB 30, 17, i3M Ma^^erltjfmanceD-.piile, ar Jong, .,.,..,.„. $73.00 

HPD-Y 160, BO 40WI p-P*rfnnn.inDB Dipoic. seleel US' of 125 1 £43.00 

530-6 160. BO, 40. 2Q. 15. I G*rl Spaw -Smref Lhjx5k.'71" long 41*5 00 

S-W'5" 80.4O.2Q, 15. 1QM «"lnnij....S1lAfiD 60 long , JIT4.00 

■Tgnijs^ Bands. Willi WsdiJ-IUalrlisr^Rflngc- Tunor &&H pii Antenna 54.00 



3,55 5A5£ (*r calafcfl ol JO dipalc-s. sJip^n, A unfcme antennas 



W9INN ANTENNAS 

Box 3F)3 Ht, Prospect IL 60056 708h3S4-3414 



CIRCLE 38 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW, EASY WAY 




WITH TEO200 FILM 

JUST 3 EASY STEPS: 

• Copy circuit pattern on TEC-200 film 
using any plain paper copier 

• Iron film on to copper clad board 

• Peel off film and etch 

convenient 8 l/2x 11 siice 
With Complete Instructions 

SATISFACTION GfJARAATTEKD 

5 Sheets for $4.95 1 Sheets only $6.95 

add $2.00 postage 

The MEADQWLAKE Corp. 

Dept J • PO Box 1555 * Oneco, FL 34264 



Be an FCC 

LICENSED 

ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN! 




Earn up to 

$60 an hour 

and more! 




Learn at home in spare time. 
No previous experience needed! 



No costly school. No commuting to class, 
The Original Home-Study course prepares 
you for the "FCC Commercial Radio- 
telephone License." This valuable license is 
your professional "ticket" to thousands of 
exciting jobs in Communications, Radio- 
TV, Microwave , Maritime, Radar, Avionics 
and more... even start your own business! 
You don't need a college degree to qualify, 
but you do need an FCC License. 

No Need to Quit Your Job or Go To School 

This proven course is easy, fast and low 
cost! GUARANTEED PASS-You get your 
FCC License or money refunded. Send for 
FREE facts now. MAIL COUPON TODAY! 
_ 2 r iJ??il !;Q?£-932-4268 Ext. 73 _ 

r COMMAND PRODUCTONf ! 



FCC LICENSE TRAINING, Dept. 73 
P.O. Box 2824, San Francisco* CA 94126 
Please rush FREE details immediately! 



WAME. 



ADDRESS. 
CITY. 



I 
I 



oi p t STATE ZIP 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 45 



Number 11 on your Feedback card 



QRP Mini-Tuner 

.4 neat little addition to your rig. 



by Mark L Meyer 



Have you ever wished for a physi- 
cally small antenna tuner for 
your portable operations or 
maybe to build into your next rig? Here 
is one that will fit the bill. 

There is nothing new about the circuit. 
This is the old familiar "T" match circuit 
that has been around for years. The fea- 
ture that will catch your attention is that 
this design uses toroids for the inductors. 
Inductors wound on toroidal cores con- 
centrate the field within the core. They 
also pack plenty of inductance into a 
small package. This allows you to com- 
pact the design without loss of perfor- 
mance. 

All the parts are easily obtained. The 
toroid cores are the garden variety avail- 
able from Palomar, Amidon, Dan's 



Small Parts, Ocean State, and many oth- 
ers. The switches specified are light-duty 
Radio Shack units. 

The variable capacitors are the APC 
type that can be panel mounted with the 
rotor and stator both insulated above 
ground, Almost any variable will work 
as long as you remember that however 
you construct your unit, neither rotor nor 
stator can be grounded. You don't have 
to worry about the plate spacing if you 
operate at QRP levels. Many of these 
can be found in the junk box and ham- 
fests, or you can order them from Dan's 
Small Parts, APC types do require an in- 
sulated knob to protect you from getting 
"bit" by RF. 

In Figure 1, the diagram specifies 150 
pF for the variable capacitors CI and C2, 



S1A 



O 



BYPASS 



BYPASS 



-o 



IN 



o — c^-K^-^ 



INPUT 
(From SWR 
Bridge) 



x? C1 



C2 



IN 



150p 



L1; 168^6 
1 5 Turns Tot 
0.1, 25, 0.5, 
0.7, 1.0 uh 



tH 8 

150p 
36p p 500 V Mrca 



S1B 



ot — a 



OUTPUT 
— O (To Antenna 
Connector) 



4T 



6T 



L1 



9T 



12T 



- 1 

-, 2 
_ 3 



MIN 



S 1 : DPDT SLIDE OR ROTARY 
RS 275-403 or RS 275-1386 (2 pos. used) 



1ST 



-, 5 



L2: T80-2 
36 Turns Tot 
1.0, 1.9, 44. 



10T 



.* D 



7.1 uh 1=2 



T4T 



24T 



4 



S2 



1 pole, 12 position 
(RS 275-1385) 



o 



36T 



- 9 



L3: T80-2 
43 Turns Tot 
4.0, 7.1. 10,8 uh 



23T 



^ 10 



L3 



34T 



-. «T 



- 11 

12 



MAX 



Alt wire on inductors 
is #22 enameled 

Total inductance Is 
18.9 uh 



(11 



Figure L QRP Antenna Tuner. 



but any value from 150 to 250 pF is suit- 
able. I had the 150 pF units, so I used 
them. On the output side, I paralleled a 
variable C2 with a 36 pF capacitor to in- 
crease the loading slightly. This will not 
be necessary if you use a 200-250 pF 
unit, 

When winding the toroids, space the 
winding out over about 3/4 of the core. 
When you come to a tap turn, twist a 
small loop in the wire and then keep on 
winding. When you have the entire 
winding on, you can use some Duco ce- 
ment, Q-dope, or epoxy to help keep the 
winding in place. Scrape the insulation 
off the end wires and off the loops you 
place for taps and you're ready to hook 
things up. 

If you use fairly stiff wires to connect 
to the taps, and if you allow room, you 
can mount the toroids hanging in air off 
the switch taps. Thin strips of copper or 
solder-saturated solder wick can be used 
as wide, flat conductors to connect to the 
capacitors and connectors to keep stray 
inductance down for better high-frequen- 
cy performance. 

With a l T' match, more than one set- 
ting of the controls can be found that will 
minimize the SWR. The correct setting 
to use is the one that maximizes the C2 f s 
capacitance. This will insure the most ef- 
ficient operation, To tune up, select a tap 
setting, set CI and C2 to mid-range, and 
then peak a received signal. Then apply 
low power, and tune CI and C2 for mini- 
mum SWR indication. Try to find a tap 
number that will result in the maximum 
C2 capacitance. Experiment. 

I have my unit built into a home-brew 
20-40-80 meter transceiver. With most 
antennas I find that I generally have the 
inductor tap set at 3 for 20 meter opera- 
tion, 6 for 40 meters, and 8 for 80 meters. 

With this antenna tuner you can use 
any of the SWR-indicating meters de- 
signed for low power. I find the one de- 
signed by G4ZNQ to be about the best. 
This bridge circuit can be found in Doug 
DeMaw's W1FB Is Design Notebook 

This little tuner will be a great addition 
to your QRP arsenal. 



46 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 



From RC-1 000 

Micro P»V-r,J«CX.« 

Computer REPEATER 

Concepts CONTROLLER 



• Autopatch* Reverse Autopatch 

• User Programmable CW ID, 
Control & User Codes & Timeouts 

Manual with schematics • 90-Day Warranty 

Wired & Tested w/ manual .... $239.95 

Micro Computer Concepts 

8849 Gum Tree Ave. 

New Port Ricfrey, FL 34653 

813-376-6575 



CIRCLE 160 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



For the Brands you know 
AT PRICES YOU CAN LIVE WITH 

toll 1-800-238-6168 

FREE FAX 901 _ 6 82-7165 

IN TENNESSEE 

CALL 

901-683-9125 




WE TRADE 



FOR GOOD 
USED GEAR 



MEMPHIS AMATEUR 
ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1465 Wells Station Road, Memphis, TN 381US 

• VISA * COD OPEN 9-5, MON./FRI. 

• MASTERCARD SAT., 9-12 



EVERY ISSUE OF 

73 Amateur Radio Today 
on Microfiche! 

The entire run of 73 from October 
1960 through last year is available. 

You can have access to the treasures 
of 73 without several hundred 
pounds of bulky back issues. Our 
24 x fiche have 98 pages each and 
will fit in a card file on your desk. 

We offer a battery operated hand 
held viewer for $75, and a desk 
model for $260. Libraries have 
these readers. 

The collection of over 600 
microfiche, is available as an entire 
set, (no partial sets) for $285 plus 
$5 shipping (USA). Annual 
updates available for $ 1 0. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
back! 

^UCKMASTER 
Route 4, Box 1630 

Mineral, Virginia 231 17 

540:894-5777-800:282-5628 

Internet: info@buckxorn 




Fax 540:894-9141 




MasterCard] 



CIRCLE 1Se ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Amplifiers, ATV Down Converters & Hard to Find Parts 



LINEAR AMPLIFIERS 



HF Amplifiers 

PC board and complete parts list for HF ampliliers described in 
[tie Motorola Application Notes and Engineering 
Bulletins: 



AN779H 

AN779L 

AN 762 

EB63 

AR305 

AN 758 

AR313 

EB27A 

EB104 

AR347 



(2QW) 

(20W) 

(140W) 

(140W) 

(300W) 

(300W) 

(MOW) 

0OOW) 

(6GCW) 

(lOOOW) 



2 Meter Amplifiers (144-14B MHz) 

(Kit or Wired and Tested) 

35W - Model 335A, $7S. 95V$109.95 

75 W - Mod*! 875 A, $11 9. 95$ 159. 95 

440-450 MHz Amplifiers 

(SSS-FM-ATV) 

100W - Wodd KEB 67, $159,95 




ATV Down Converters 
(Kit or Wired and Tested} 

Model ATV-3 (420-450) 
(GaAS- FET) 
$49.95/§69.95 

Model ATV-4 (902-926) 
(GaAS - FET] 
$59.95/579.95 



HARD TO HMD PARTS 



* RF Power Transistors 

■ Broadband HF Transformers 

* Chip Caps - K&rnei/ATC 

* Metalclad Mica Caps Unelco/S*mco 

* ARCO/SPR AGUE Trimmer Capacitors 
Wa can oat ycnj viduaBy any RF Irareistorf 
OH US fat "strange" hand to find parts* 



DIGITAL FREQUENCY READOUT 

Fo* older analog transceivers 

TK-1 (Wired and TesladJSt 4^.95 



For detailed information and prices, call or write for 3 our free catalog! 



ADDITIONAL ITEMS 
Hut Sink Material 

Model 99 Heal Sink (6.5" x 12 T * 1,6"), S24.0Q 
CHS^a Copp&r Spreader [9 "x 6" x 3fB"), $£4.oo 
Low Pass Filters (up to 3GDW) for harmonics 

Specily 10M, IBM, 20M, 40M, 80M or 16QM 
HF Splitters and Combiners up to 2KW 




Add $4.50 tor shipping and handling 



CCI 



(Communication 
oncepts Inc. 



MY* L"# ^ .ji J 



^08 Millstone Drive • Beavercreek, Ohio 45434-5S40 
Phone: (5 13)426-8600 * PAX (513) 429-3811 



CtRCLE 99 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Subscribe to 73 Amateur Radio Today. 

CALL (800) 274-7373. 



*E SHIF WORLDWIDE 

Barru E 


lectronic 



Your one source for all Radio Equipment! 




KITTY SAYS: WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

*Sat, 10-5 *Sun. 11;3D-5 'M-F&-6 GametoBwy'sttrr the beat buys In town. 



For the best buys in town call: 
212 9257000 

Los Pracios Mas Bajot en Nueva York 
WE SHIP WORLDWIDE! 

Export orders expedited, 
specif export prices. 



m 



Vmsu Vann. 

FTKJOTli <lAi nil Li 
'.Vf IUH*- i hjuK VXMM 

fw aowrgajwrn 

VR-35H5. S(BC nwflSJW 



SPlO, SP50. Pt1Q, G^OOO. M12D. 
GtaMO. GR3PC cepeaters, 
Wo 9BTVB-, Omrarnmenta -tonflulata *ErVi|»BBl»ft*Ow«Bapi and 'DoniMtfe nrdar*. 



MOTOROLA 



Jttfifif lffft ) GO, t TAKE MY RADIO. 
SPECIALIST IN RADIOS: 
•BUSINESS "MARINE 

♦AVIATION -HAW RADIOS 
♦SCANNERS 




ICOM 



contact ue tcr n* LHOT in 

U£4*£BE AHD HJUr flA3*Aj, 
SrtJffTUiAVL n&SWEHE 4 BSAMCHB 

SrAhJDWG. MMtOtS, R3LU JFC. Uni K*iv. 

BH UE HEW I »q te-^ nim r imfcj ft* tuw^ 



KENWOOD 



■'YAESU Ham & Vertex Business Radios" ft-™. 

FT-SIR, FT&50D. FT-1 1 , FT-2500, FT-390. FRfrtoOB, FT-1D00D, FT-S30 FT- 
5200, FT41 IE. FT-WO r FT-900AT ( FRQ-T00&, FT-23R, FL-TCOOUnaar. New 
VXR 500D simiriBsriad TEuefller 33 wartts. MForUHF. NEW MARINE VXM-1 W. 



HAM, MARINE. BUSINESS 
AND AVIATION RADIOS. 

261^,4^1-^2340-^ 

27QO-HJC-D10O, GP-22A 

NH W R3CkT/F40LT,Hie, 

U1S, VtOO.ard repeatefs. 

SHORTWAVE RECEIVERS 

H-1, H-100,fl'7000, 

R-9O0O, H-71, GP-22A. 




ANTENNAS 

HuSlfe- KLW.MET? Ubar. 
w^UH'.i;!. rONN^.SjtlBirui 



ICOM HANDHELDS 

F3TjLT.^!Hr. Vffim.ZlK VfiB. 
EGXAT. 4GXAT. V21AT, X21AT 



-TS-SG5-. T545^AT, n.SCCHXT3^Ei03,TW 
^4l.«41A, TR-7E1A Ke-iwixui 5ww::r. H.ir-»' 
TSUDS, TSSPOS, RT?- 1 , TSrTflOW. TS9S3SO, 
Ttf ?Bft[D). TH3a, , 4EA I TM-341A, T^.^ iA, 
TW.733A, TM-MIA. TW-7*?A. 



WflrilNc RADIOS 

ICGW M7. Ml 1, M56. M7QQTY, H900, 

AVIATJOW PORTAflLe ICOM AZi, 

MOTOROLA. TRITON MARINE 



SurwJlPariDE! Devices 
Available 




Linear Amplifier 
Air^nDron, team, Kenwood. Yabsu 




Motofdn, ICOM. Mq)«x\ Yewsu, 
FTH aXfl/7006, ate. Unldan. 

Martne ICOM; MiQA, mil, etc, 
Avldlitiri ICOM: A22, ASM 




SATELLITE 
TELEPHONES 

Ultimate, transportable 
telephone. Make ana 
receive phone calls, 
Tax, telex , data, 
anywhere in the world. 
Write or Call for pi-ices, 



Sava money on batteries. 
Call far Special Prices. 



Shortwave Receivers 

*.&£KW ■ GRIWRIG ■ JPC 

■ VAESU ■ ICOM 

Call 221 2-925-7000 

SateNite telephone in suitcase tor 
worldwide uae. call 



ICIM MOTOROLA RADIUS 

SJ'AWLW- "I -Anif.'K 



TH-7gA(D) 
Kanwood' 



FT^IR 



CB Radios Stocked 

^4aQTL Wasfijncton. Ftangef £H?C-7Q r 
Arfl&rnas: Wiison, Aji hji i, e^c 
P£«»r nlk*s wflweps ■ 
ECHO - Ei.verL.igle etc 



Cwnpuier mttrfaut 

St(Klsetf; MFJ-127DB, 
MFJ-1274. MfJ-122'l r AEA 
Prti^FJfl. MFJ-127eT, PK-iJOO. 
PK-232MOX W/FAX, DRSi 
PRODUCTS DSP 2232 



Wlda aalacficfi ol SW £ 
AmaifiMj PublcalianB. 




Barry's supplies atl 
MFJ prcKtuots 
Call lis direct. 



Antenna Tunara: 

MFJ, AvEA AT4M, 

ICOM, KENWOOD, 

YA6SU. VERTEX 



~ 



CDMNERCIAL 

HEPEATEHSi 
StOCKtD. 
WniTE F^H 

QUOIEB 



KAWTHDNICS 
KAU PL(JS Efe 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVERS 

STOCKED 



ALINCO DJ- 5SQT, DJ-5S2T. etc. 



Privacy scrams lars 
Tor r actios, and 
pfrtn«i. CALL 



DomGsiic A Special 

Prices tor Export 

QP300, QM3O0. P1 10, FP50, tfc. 

BIRD Wattmeters A 

E kTFienls Fn Stock 



ANTENNAS: 

AEA, 

^U:ri3D6Ja,A«Ll, 

An hit i a 
Specialist. a£:^i 

* "Winsfliacm. 

CnmrtOu^rcian 

Dinnnyi!!. flflP 

Hv-Gnkn, HiigfiHr 

■. ;irunr - H; 

Walt-Mcr<jr4 

i: :^:ki: I 



Etottron 
Tubes: 
EIWrAC, GE P 
RCA. iCO, 
Call for 
prices. 



E.IMAC 

&72B, SJS6C 
12BV7A &. 
6146S 



G AfiMlN GPS RECEIVERS 




MOTOROLA AUTHORIZED DEALER 

KACHJN A COMMUNICATIONS DEALER 

AUTHORIZED amplifiers 
DEALER n s J?™ £IJ 

f^^vm*.. RF Concepts 

SON jl> M,rage 

Short wave Radios SlocKed TE s ^ s1ern * 

DIGITAL FREQUENCY CUU^TERS 

OPTOfliCTfiONlCS^otiel 'SCOKi'A D-130 n MHi 

ES»,^?10 H 0-2203 MM*. 26WH. tnC-3000. 2610 

Lofirj- r anrje Wireless 
telephone tot QWts&az. CALL 



Radios for Business, 

Government 

Stocked & Serviced 

Call or FAX for Great Prices! 



ISl£P£QO£jy&£&ici! 

PflBJiaa iDtaahgru cnlH |rim your raflo to phCfla linn, 
Cleat HVnl&hinUiAnd iHHttvlng flhKjno r^lj v^hSfB l^^fi afB 
np pN-m« imes. 5npe B l£4. Wl*» or tan t<K inquire?. 



9ENCHEFI PftDDLES 

BALUNB, LOW PA5B FILTERS 

IN STOCK 



MIRAGE/RFC Amplifiers 
ASTRO N POWER SUPPLES 

Bekten Wire 4 Cable, Int'i Wire 

QPTOELECTRQNJCS STOCKED 



Shortwave Radios 



JRC, ICOM, 
KENWOOD, YAESU, 
SONY and GRUNDIG 



hiy-Gain Tdw6rs 
wllr tie snipped 

direct to you 
FREE of 

shipping cost. 



Amplifiers, HF/VHF/UHF 
AlylERITROH, etc. 



BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP., 540 BROADWAY, NY S NY 10012 iFr*ax*sr, aicmi si.. bMnaeq spmg& Prinn st> FAX 212-925-7001 Phone 212-925^7000 



NoiA/ Vnrle i^it^/'c LARGE ^ T stocking two wavradpo dealer 
iut;w TLrrrvviiys complete repair lab on premises 



"Aqui Se Habia Espanol" 

B.ARRY INTERNATIONAL 

FAX 21 2-9^5-7001 Pho ne 21 2-925-7000 

For Orders Call 1-800-990-2929 



M«HJarFrii*y a AM tn n pm 

Subways: lie Spring Si Sop, N or R r^jn Id Princa Si. slop 

F Inn 1a Houston &. step. 
Bus: Qrcaavijiy OyS K- PnnCTf St. flog.. Pjiturain toWi St;lSrh Ave. 



COMMERCIAL PAOtOS STOCKED; 

•MOTGSCH.A 'ICOM 

*(VA"XON ^STANDAftD, 

*VA£SU -FtELM edq.. 

Wa sorvo friuncipsJlies. 

buBineBfies, Ciwl Datensfr, 

*tc Partablesi, moDifes, 

Daaas. rapeEilara .. 



W& Stack: AEA^ Alinco h Ameso, Amentron, Arrtenna Spooaftst, AflRL, 
AstHtjg, Astrfxi, &SK, BeJben, Bencher, Bird, BullorriLiI, CE3. Cuar.cran 
Corian, Daiwa, Eirmac, Henry Heil, Hustler. Hy-Gain, Icom, KLM, 
Kflfilronica, K&nwoori, Larsert, MaMon, MFJ, NUnage, Mororoia,. Nya, 
Paloinar, RF Products. Shu re, Standard, TUBES & Tubs Caddys, 
Unidan. Vaosu, Vibropleit, Duplejeara, HepSEtl^r^, Scanner?, RarJio 

WE MOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUHeCATIONS SYSTEMS 

DEALER INQUIRIES IMVITED PHONE IN DHDEKS RE RE MflUPSED 

COMMERCIAL RADIOS STOCKED & SERVICE ON PREMI&E&. 

EXPORT &toiert sfupped immediaieiy CALL 



SALES FINAL 



Technical help offered upjah purchase FAX I 212-92 S'700 1 



CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 47 



73 Review 



Number 12 on your Feedback card 



by Peter H. Putman KT2B 



The Ramsey Electronics 



SX-20 




SSB/CW 



20m Transceiver 



Ramsey Electronics 

793 Canning Parkway 

Victor. NY 14564-8924 

Price class: $349.95 {kit) 

$429.95 (wired and tested) 



A QRP powerhouse. 



Yes. that's right . . . another 
QRP ng for 20 meters. Boy, 
its getting harder to flip through 
73 these days without coming 
across an advertisement or re- 
view for transceivers like these. 
Buitd*it*yourself QRP rigs for 20 
m. 40 m t and other bands are 
about as hot as pogs. O. J. 
Simpson, and sport utility vehi- 
cles! But the SX-20 isn't really 
"just another QRP rig," what 
with features like direct digital 
synthesis (DOS), duat VFOs, 
RIT t built-in iambic keyer, three 
different tuning speeds, WWV 
coverage, and a pretty versatile 
CW filter. And it's all yours for 
about $350 and a couple of 
weekends of your time. 

When I first saw the SX-20 at Dayton 94, I 
was impressed with its compact size, one- 
piece board construction, and range of fea- 
tures. II was only a matter of time before \ 
persuaded John Ramsey to send one down 
for a build-up and evaluation. And my timing 
was perfect: While SX-20s had previously 
been shipped, wired, and tested, the kit ver- 
sions were just being released, meaning Id 
have a chance to debug the manual during 
construction. 

Specifications 

The design behind the SX-20 is pretty 
clever, packing a tot of features into a 9.5"W x 
3.7"H x 9*0 case weighing all of 5 pounds 
(see Figure 1). It makes extensive use of LSI 
chips for all active signal processing, and tun- 
ing adjustments are kept to a minimum, Fre- 
quency coverage is from 14.0 to 14,5 MHz on 
receive and 14.0 to 14.35 MHz on transmit, 
using either 10-Hz, 100-Hz, or 1-kHz steps. 

The output stage uses a pair of P3055E 
power MOSFETs, and maximum power out- 
put is speeded at 10 watts, though you can 

48 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 




adjust this down to under 1 watt using the 
ALC control for true-blue QRP operation. Re- 
ceiver sensitivity is claimed to be less than 
,25 jiV for 10 dB S/N, and selectivity in stan- 
dard SSB mode is -6 dB > 2.3 kHz and -60 
dB < 4.0 kHz, But enough numbers! Let's 
take a look inside the SX-20 and see what 
makes it tick. 

How It Works 

The heart of the SX-20 is a Harris 
HSP45102 chip, working as a direct digital 
synthesizer, DDS circuits have become quite 
popular tn contemporary transceiver designs, 
owing to a combination of reasonable cost, 
compact size, and accuracy. It outputs LO 
frequencies between 7.5 and 8.5 MHz t which 
are mixed with the incoming 20 meter signals 
in an NE602A mixer chip to the first IF of 
6.143 MHz. Additional filtering Is provided by 
a six-pole, 2.5-kHz crystal filter before the 
signal is sen! to a CA1350P IF amplifier. An- 
other NE602A mixer works with the second 
LO at 6.1415 MH2 and a CW/SSB frequency 
offset circuit to provide signals for the LM324 



audio amplifier. 

In transmit mode, incoming 
audio signals are amplified a 
couple of times and fed to a 
MC1496 balanced modulator/ 
mixer circuit. The suppressed 
carrier 6.1415 MHz signal from 
this chip is then sent through 
the same six-pole crystal filter 
from before and into an NE602 
mixer, which combines this sig- 
nal with the same 7.5- to 8.5- 
MHz DDS frequencies to pro- 
duce the final 20 meter signal. 
Additional bandpass filtering 
cleans up the RF before it gets 
to the 2N3866 pre-driver, 
P3055E driver, and the final out- 
put stage. 

The "brains" of the circuit (as 
Ramsey likes to call it) is a member of the 
popular Motorola 68HC05-series microcon- 
troller family. Working with a handful of other 
components, including an inverter and shift 
register, this processor controls front panel 
displays, interprets switch closures from the 
front panel membrane keyboard, and selects 
the various TX/RX, filter, and mode states. 

While there are quite a few bipolar transis- 
tors scattered throughout the circuit, they're 
all either 228256 PNP or 2N3904 NPN de- 
vices that perform very simple functions — in 
fact, most of the time they're just working as 
switches or low-level amplifiers. This is one of 
the reasons there are so few circuits to tune 
in the SX-20, and why the kit is so reasonably 
priced — none of the components used is that 
exotic and costly. Even the 68HC05 micro is 
available in abundant quantities and itera- 
tions, 

Human interfaces to the SX-20 (let's not 
forget those!) include a main tuning control, 
microphone gain control, volume control, a 
standard eight-pin microphone connector that 
works with Ramsey s mikes or any ICOM mi- 



crophone, and membrane-button controls for 
TUNING SPEED. DIAL LOCK, RIT ; MODE, 
KEYEFT ATTENUATOR, AGC FAST/SLOW, 
VFO A/B. and WWV. The display is made up 
of eight-segment, red, alphanumeric LEDs 
(you were expecting LCDs?) that read to 10- 
Hz resolution; an eight-step LED S-meter and 
headphone jack round out the front panel. 

Rear-panel connections are kept to a mini- 
mum; a standard SO-239 UHF jack for the 
antenna, stereo phone jack for your CW key, 
and a 2,5 mm power jack for connection to 
12-14 volts, I should add that I'm not thrilled 
with the use of that particular power plug, as 
they slide out of the jacks quite easily. My 
suggestion would be to go to a Molex or other 
locking connector. 

Other controls are provided for calibrating 
the S-meter, setting the sidetone level when 
transmitting CW, setting the CW TX/RX cycle 
delay, and controlling power output. But you'll 
need to remove the cover to adjust them. 
Considering that CW delay and sidetone lev- 
els are often adjusted to suit the operating 
circumstances, I think it would be smart of 
Ramsey to relocate these controls and pro- 
vide access to them either through the side or 
top of the transceiver. 

Putting It Together 

Ramsey has always done a first-rate job of 
packaging up their kits, and the SX-20 is no 
exception. There are eight different sub- 
assemblies to put together, and individual 
bags with all the parts for each are clearly 
identified. Good thing, too, as there are near- 
ly 60O individual components in the kit (not In- 
cluding the optional CW filter)! But mistakes 
can happen; my particular kit was missing the 
microcontroller and DDS chips, which were 
promptly shipped via express mail after a call 
to Rochester. 

If you read the manual carefully, you 
should have little difficulty in getting each 
stage of the SX-20 up and running. Each 
section opens with a discussion of the theory 
and operation of that circuit, followed by a 
detailed parts list and parts overlay. Three 
schematics and two large overlays are 
also provided with views of the main board 
and front panel, so locating parts is a quick 
job. 

\n addition, both the front panel and main 
PC boards have part numbers and locations 
screened right on them; thus, if you install 
something backwards, blame that guy in the 
mirror! (Hint: When first setting up my work 
area, I usually spread out sheets of white pa- 
per to sort the various parts on. It is consider- 
ably easier to spot small capacitors, diodes, 
and resistors this way.) 

The SX-20 instruction manual contains the 
usual detailed instructions t check-your-work 
boxes, and off-the-wall Ramsey wit. (The 
jokes and puns are especially effective during 
a 3 am building session.) At the end of each 
chapter, you solder up a few wires, apply 
power, and check to see if that particular cir- 
cuit is functional. If not, some troubleshooting 
hints are provided so you can back up and 
recheck your work. 



Fun and Games 

Probably the trickiest part of the project is 
the front panel assembly, which uses 21 dif- 
ferent LEDs for indicators. Because the front 
panel itself is a membrane keyboard, you 
must take care must when soldering in the 
LEDs to avoid pressing too hard against the 
panel and damaging it. What you actually do 
is insert all the LEDs in their holes, attach the 
panel, and tilt everything upside down. The 
LEDs will just touch the membrane and you 
can finish soldering and trimming leads, (Of 
course, J managed to put one LED in back- 
wards!) 

Another tricky job involves winding the var- 
ious transformers between the predriver and 
driver stages, driver and finals, and final out- 
put. These are turns of #24 enamel on large 
ferrite cores which have been pre-drilled 
While winding the turns isn't hard in itself, 
there have been problems with sharp edges 
on the core holes that have actually nicked 
the wire. Since the cores are made of a con- 
ductive material, it's possible that the 13,8 
volt supply could be shorted, or that turns 
could be shorted to themselves. (This hap- 
pened to me.) Tom Hodge of Ramsey ad- 
vised me that they are now checking these 
cores under magnifying glasses to make sure 
they're deburred. 

More fun stuff; While testing the front pan- 
el, I inadvertently installed one of the Relliflex 
cables into the wrong side of the connector. 
After talking to the folks at Ramsey and real- 
izing my error, I inserted it the correct way — 
and nothing happened! When I first installed 
the cable incorrectly, it "dimpled" the silver 
fingers enough so they wouldn't make con- 
tact. Rubbing them gently with a pencil eraser 
cured the problem. 

Here's another change for the better: Dur- 
ing testing of each stage of the SX-20, the 
manual requires you to solder up volume 
control, power T and speaker wires, then des- 
older them so you can proceed with the next 
assembly and be able to flip the board over 
and back. Current kit versions now use molex 
connectors to eliminate these steps and re- 
lieve wire stress. 

While these may sound like an annoying 



series of minor problems, I can assure you 
they are quite common when debugging a kit 
and in every case were easily fixed {especial- 
ly problems caused by my careless assem- 
bly!); nor did they slow me down much, as I 
was still able to test all of the stages of the rig 
to make sure things were working. When I hit 
a real stumper, Tom Hodge was able to come 
up with a good answer in short order. 

By now, you may be wondering how long it 
will take to assemble an SX-20. I like to buitd 
at odd hours and work pretty quickly, but my 
conservative guess is probably four or five 
nights, with plenty of breaks to check your 
work and stretch. And you don't need much 
in the way of tools, either; a 25W to 40W sol- 
dering iron, diagonal cutters, small pliers, and 
wire strippers will suffice for board assembly. 
A magnifying worklamp is a real help. 

Alignment 

Tuning up the SX-20 is a fairly quick proce- 
dure, and using some rudimentary test equip- 
ment makes it go a lot faster. The receiver 
can be aligned with a strong on-air signal, but 
I used my time-tested HP608F signal genera- 
tor, since it isn't affected by sunspotsl Ram- 
sey provides their universal "diddle stick" 
plastic alignment tool, which is used to peak 
up about nine different transformers for maxi- 
mum signal. The calibrated generator also 
makes it easier to set the S-meter correctly, 
but you could also do this by comparing sig- 
nals to a calibrated reading on another rig. 

On transmit, a frequency counter is a must 
to set the local oscillators to 6.143 and 
6.1415 MHz. I suggest letting the radio warm 
up and sit for about 15 minutes before mak- 
ing this adjustment. You'll need a VOM or 
FETVOM to set the idling current for the driv- 
er and finals, and this setting will change 
slightly as the FETs warm up. Make sure you 
hook up a good 50-ohm dummy load (or an- 
tenna, if you haven't anything else to use) 
during this step. If you have access to an ac- 
curate wattmeter, you can set the power out- 
put down as low as 1 watt and as high as 12 
watts by adjusting the ALC control. 

When you first turn on the SX-20, it signals 
u 7" in CW and the numbers "7" and iL 3" march 



Specifications 

RAMSEY ELECTRONICS SX-20 20 METER TRANSCEIVER: 



Price: 



Frequency Coverage; 



Power Requirements: 



Output Power: 
Spurious Emissions: 
Sensitivity: 
Selectivity: 

Spurious Rejection: 
Audio Output Power: 
Dimensions: 
Weight: 



$349.95 in kit form 

$429.95 wired and tested 

Receive 14.0—14.5 MHz in 10-Hz steps 

WWV © 15.000 MHz 

Transmit 14.0—14.35 MHz in 10-Hz steps 

13-BVDC(11.8to 15.8 VDC) 

Transmit: 5.0 A 
Receive: 500 mA 
10 Watts PEP 

> 50 dB below peak power 
<0,25 ^VfortOdBS/N 

-6 dB > 2.3 kHz 
-60 dB < 4.0 kHz 

> 70 dB 

>2.6 W @ 10% distortion across 8 ohms 
a5 ll (W)x37"(H)x9,0 l, (D) 

5 IbS^ 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 49 



m<3m 




FAST SERVICE • DISCOUNT PRICES 



Visit Our INTERNET Site 

http://www.al Icorp .com/al Icorp/ 





PORTABLE SCSI CASE 



Nearly complete case for SCSI device 
Includes 40 watt power supply 
(5 Vdc @3 amps, 
12 Vdc @ 2 amps) 
with cooling far, 
power switch 
fuse holder, 
LED socket, 
power input 
receptacle, 
two standard bu p 
SCSI interface jacks, molex-type power connec- 
tors, interior cable with 50 pin socket connector 
and interior mounting raits. Front face plate is 
an aftermarket piece that doesn't quite go with 
the box but serves the purpose pretty well. 
Absent from the case is the switch in back which 
specifies the device's position in the chain. This 
can be easily bypassed with a few 0.1 nr shorting 
jumpers. Also not included is a standard I EC 
power cord. Off-white case j/\nc 
is 14.25" X 7.38' 1 X 3.26 ' {£ 1 Q"^ 
and has a folding handle ' *& each 

for easy carrying 
CAT# SCSI-1 



2 for $36 .00 



MERCURY TILT SWITCH 




SPST mercury tilt switch. 
Glass bulb is 0.25 "dia. X 



0,67 h long. Circuit is closed in 
vertical position. Rated 750 ma. 

CAT# MS-1 5 



$1 



00 

each 



10 for $9.50 100forS80,00 



9* DUAL 
AUDIO CABLE 



4K4/i 



'AMTfTy 



UjE/l 




9' shielded dual audio cable with color coded 
(red and yellow) RCA style pin 
plugs either end. Black cable. 

CAT#DC8-108 



$1 



00 



10 for $8.50*100 for $75.00 
1000 for S500.00 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

1-800-826-5432 

CHARGE ORDERS to Visa, M&stercsrd or Discover 



TERMS. NO MINIMUM ORDER. Shipping and handfing for tttQ 
4S continental U.S.A. $5.00 per order. All oth&rs including AK, 
HI, Pf\ or Canada musl pay lull shipping. AH orders delivered in 
CALIFORNIA musl include local stala sales lax Qualifies 

Limbed NO COD. Prices subjed 
CALL WRITE to change without notice. 



MAIL ORDERS TO: 

ALL ELECTRONICS 

CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 567 

Van Nuys, CA 91 408 



FAX or E-WLAIL 

for our FREE 

64 Page 
CATALOG 

Outside the U>5,A. 
«end S2-00 postage 



_ FAX (818)781-2653 

E-Mail allcorp@allcorp.com 



CIRCLE 194 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Spectrum Electronic Prod- 
ucts introduces the world's 
first hand held repeater con- 
troller, Mo larger than most 
ha ndheld radios, theHRC-1 
co rwerts a single or d ua I ■ band 
radio into a full featured sim- 
plex or duplex repeater sys- 
tem. Key features oftheHRC- 



10 include voice IDer, DTMF 
Control and programming, 
hang and time-out timers, 
Digital Voice Operated 
Squelch (DVOS 1 *), telem- 
etry tones, and private votce 
mail slot $299 
Phone 800*566-2788 
FAX 408-43^6027 



A 



CIRCLE 69 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



FHto-J rolls up jwitf tilde* ki Pfis, 4-Minc« prcM-sUted hoklVi, 

WniliFig hhe 11V Gfnin m n bm\* [l|l you IHWIJ ruir.rnjiflling 
Signal pwnJl, 

CiiBliiinlcnllt iirio'hlSflllsLuiH'^ hLink iw?ailigr &(*ai£d Miwi 
PBVCBl a titttlk WKJ-fedJlinllWilve.-ihtBiTin leody lotaig;niyw1iflre. Sus- 
pend hi tlia apwrtn^N closer, or p;illa tfoo™jiy. Attach Pleo-J 10 Mrwtaw 



r\ 





glass of t urtnin Hjct I k (li^pdi iw raijiak |«jr I inwvttuni Kl paw. 
iiitpln oimii tvt'riwnvp nriin, 

Cnrry l»lco-J with ytm tar em?rgfl4ious. Hung In tint mtX?) mtipn «i ma 

KKKJ. PHp Impj^ves mi^U. fonmslg recepfrJOlt, *.1ir?r: p»n*rles. 

Ptcij.J comes rcvdy lor woik y,i|h ?5" tainted conxlol leedltaa nntl gold 

(jJ|iP«C. Ty\*r.*A •tru*.t D -fdp>ff SWn^iidfP 1.2:1. UmKl-cralttdliMne 

U.S.A. 



Bdk 54XM1?-U 

Ppove L ur 



Models 

2 frtaicps 

DijtVI Onnd Jv*l St 



Ordvr Holline 
801-373-B425 




CIRCLE B9 ON READER SERVICE CADD 



ONV SAFETY BELT CO. 

P.O. Box 404 » Ramsey, NJ 07446 

800-345-5634 

Phone & FAX 201-327-2462 



ONV Safety Belt With Seat Harness 
^LJi !|« ' $89-95 

*" OSHA 

We Ship 

Worldwide 

Order Desk Open 

1 Days/Week 

ONV Tool Pouch $1 5:95 
Add $4.00 For Handling VISA WC CHECK 



ONV Bel! W/O Seat Harness 
$74.95 



CIRCLE 102 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CDMTELCO '»°vstr,es 




i 



* 




Dual Band 

Mobile 

Antenna 

140 MHz, 440 MHz 

MAGNET MOUNT $21.95 

150 watt 12ft. RG5S + connector 
PERMANENT MOUNT $23,50 

with NMO/TAD mount 17ft RG58 

BNC or PL259 connector 

DBD2 DUPLEXER $49,00 

UHF connectors S 11 leads 

Add 3.50 S&H 

1 -300-634-4622 

C0MTELC0 INDUSTRIES, INC, 

501 Mitehell Rd, Glendale His., IL 60139 



1 



I 



l 




CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



along the screen; this is part of the boot-up 
test on the microcontroller. The display wilt 
then turn to 14.225.00 MHz (14.125.00 MHz 
on VFO B) and you'll be in business. Ramsey 
sent along the optional CW switched -capaci- 
tor filter kit, which comes "from the factory set 
at 700 Hz bandwidth. I switched it to 500 Hz 
by resoldering a few jumpers, plugged ft in, 
and got an the air in short order. 

On the Air 

Trie SX-20 compared favorably to my tC- 
751 A in just about every instance, except 
when signals stronger than about S7 were re- 
ceived. In this case, the audio quality seemed 
a bit harsh, as if the waveform was flat-top- 
ping a bit, and this applied regardless of 
whether the AGC was set to fast or slow. 
Sensitivity measurements for 10 dB S/N are 
pretty much as claimed, and I measured 51 
with 4 |iV of signal applied at 14.225 MHz. 
The 500-Hz CW filter works as well as my IC- 
751 A, with very little ringing. 

In transmit mode, I had some trouble get- 
ting much output with my standard ICOM mo- 
bile microphone. Switching to an SM-8 mike 
and cranking the gain up almost all the way 
produced better results, but it took some re- 
working of the preamplifier stages, as men- 
tioned earlier, 1 also substituted the stock 
Ramsey hand-held mike and got the same 
results, so you'll probably want to run the MIC 
GAIN control about 75% open. 

The CW keyer speed is set by plugging in 
an iambic paddle, pushing the KEYER 
SPEED button, and sending dashes or dots 
while rotating the main tuning knob. Keyer 
speed can be set from wpm (basically carri- 
er on) to 30 wpm, but J should point out the 
key is also active in SSB mode. Tapping it 
won't send CW but will switch the rig into 
transmit mode; so watch those elbows! 

Received signal reports were good in SSB 
mode, comparable to my ICOM setup with a 
hand-held microphone. On CW, the keying is 
very smooth, although it sounded not entirely 
free of clicks. I'd like to see the folks at Ram- 
sey get rid of the T/R relay and use PIN 
diodes for switching, thereby allowing full 
break-in operation. You'll also want to tweak 
the CW sidetone a few times, since I found 
that a good setting for the internal speaker 
was too loud with headphones, Ramsey is 
now shipping a slightly larger tuning knob 
with a finger recess, which makes rapid fre- 
quency excursions easier. 

Conclusions 

The SX-20 is definitely not for the first-time 
kit builder, but if you've togged a few hours on 
your soldering iron and are used to "stuffing 
boards," it's a fun kit to put together and you'll 
be very pleased with the performance of the 
radio for the price, Its size lends itself well 
to suitcase or backpack operation, and 
there's any number of small antenna designs 
that work nicely with it. By the way, for you 
40 meter enthusiasts, Ramsey is now consid- 
ering brewing up an SX-40. Perhaps we'll 
get lucky and also see versions for 15 and 
10 metersl 



50 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



Rugged G5RV QuicKits 



TV 



Fasr&Et^ ro Build 

■ Fatl-Saf,? vjsiiil ia^[ci£Ctii>Ds 

■ N-> mtaiiiinji or culting 

■ Evtryihiag JacEiaJiJ 

* Finish antenna in milHiMs. 

Qui I iy 0>rrtjnm.*Tl I* 

* PresoLdereJ Silver Fktii££ 

■ Kja.kpr.wf QiJetFkxwEff 

* Fully in^ttlited. v,t: twaUVt, 

1-"— jvrro-d-c. l-.-w koU* -i^^j^n 

Urn* All Bind* ln:i WARC 
Viinl PJ4ni, FiTTfmv Data? 



J3-'x MW2-S, Pr-nv,. L'T tMtfO? 



• Double 5iaeG5RV 

awn i60-r&DipN.!if 

• Full Siiw GSR V 
\0Zil JSl-l.-J-DifM.-4c 

*B*lf£lifG5R.V 

31 it 4-n-Ert Dip-.iju 

•turner SiirGSRV 

34 ft 20-IODipnit 

• Rftidj.-MaHe l02frGSRV 
■Kcad^Mxfc Ji ftGSUVtf 
■ 100' {toot}* J34M lint 

Od** Hot-Lino: 



139.M 

SrM '■■■■ 

SSQ.TO 
WQ-OO 
111-95 
Add 95 P&H 



Irdtr TfchNfltc #H4-D SfcgJ fipd USA | 1»SQ0 -926 -7373 

CIRCLE 116 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



GIVE YOUR 

HR-2510 HR-2600 

the mime features tt.\ the 

"BIG RIGS" 



CHIPSWITCH 

4773 Sonoma Hwy. Suite !32 
Santa Rosa, CA 95409-4269 

Write or call (707) 53*K»5l 2 for FREF, Information 



CIRCLE 265 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



/-BOOMLESS QUADS \ 



s 219 95 - 3 Band - 2 Element HF 



3-4 Dements available. 

Also VV.A.RC Bands. 2 meter loop FREE 

Sold world zvid& for over 15 years. 

OEM QUAD 

Box 291, Boissevdn, Manitoba Canada ROK 0E0 
\j3<6phon6 1-204-53^6184 PricaFO&.Ftcioff^/ 



INSURANCE 
Computer & Radio Equipment 

HAMSURE coverage follows your 
equipment wherever you take it. Theft 
from vehicles, earthquake, water damage 
and all other hazards including surges. 
Insure all your equipment and accessories 
(except towers and antennas but including 
rotors), media and purchased software. 
Low Premium Low Deductible 

HAMSURE 

7901 Laguna Lane 
Orland Park, IL 60462 

800 - 988-7702 



Avaifabte only in the 
48 contiguous states 




1 


F ^ni 


1 


I 


U^-rCij^y 


i 


1* 


i^toni^taiiH 


■ 



CIRCLE 78 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



DIRECTION FI 

^ JVECTOR-FINDER 

HAND-HELD 

PHASE SENSE 

ANTENNAS FOR 

VHF DIRECTION 

FINDING. USES 

ANY FM RCVR, 

ARMS FOLD FOR 

STORAGE . 

TYPE VF-142 144-220 MHZ $139-95 
TYPE VF-142Q LEFT-RIGHT LEDS £ 

AUDIO, 144-220 MHZ $239.95 
TYPE VF-14 2QH SAME AS Q MODEL 

EXCEPT FREG- 144^500 MHZ $289.95 
TYPE VF-121Q SAME AS VF-142Q 

PLUS 121 .5 MHZ E LT FREQ $3 79 

^4.50 




CALL ABOUT HF DF p 
ATTENUATORS 



ADD 
CA 



.95 

S/H 
ADD TAX 



RADIO ENGINEERS 



Ar 

\ / 7969 ENGINEER RD, #102 
" SAN DIEGO, CA 92111 

619-565-1319 FAX 619-571-5909 



CIRCLE 58 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD METER 



Reduce exposure to potentially harmlul 
electromagnetic fields. AlphaLab T s handheld TriField™ 
Meter measures AC electric fields, AC magnetic fields 
and radio/microwave power density. Find ground faults, 
AC current wires or measure high-field generators with 
the Magnetic setting (.2 - 100 milligauss, 60 Hz); identify 
poorly grounded or shielded equipment, high VDT or 
fluorescent light fields, distinguish hot vs. ground wires 
with Electric setting (.5 - 100 kV/rn, 60 Hz); measure 
antenna radiation patterns, leaky microwave ovens, etc. 
on RF/microwave setting {50 MHz to 3 GHz, .01 to f 
mW/cm 2 ). 

Electric and magnetic settings are omnidirectional, 
measuring full magnitude of fields without the need to 
reorient the meter. Price of $145 includes delivery and 
one-year warranty, 

AlphaLab, 1280 South 300 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Call 
800-769-3754 OR 801-487-9492 for speedier service or free 
literature on electromagnetic radiation health risks. 




- 



<, *• *"#pi 




« ■■■.! ' 



Sell your products in 73 Amateur Radio Today, 

CALL (800) 274-7373. 




ELENCO • HITACHI • B&K PRODUCTS call toll free 



GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES 



1-800-292-7711 
l-e00-d45-3201 (Can.) 



AFFORDABLE - HIGH QUALITY ELENCO OSCILLOSCOPES 



2 YEAR WARRANTY 



Hitachi Compact Series Scopes 








v-2i2 - SQMHi Dual Tro» Tff 

V-&25 - SOMHz, Cursors 

V--S23 ■ SQMHz, Delayed Sweep 

SoMNi, DC Offset 

40MHz, 

2DMHZ, 



DC Oflset . 
DC Offset _ 
60MH?. Dual Trace 



STANDARD SERIES 

S-1235 25MHZ £325 S-1 340 40MHZ $495 
$-1365 60MHZ $*49 

FeaiureSr 

■ High Lumi-imce 6" CRT ■ TV Sync 

■ 1 mV Sertshiviiy ■ 3 - 1 1 . x 1 o Probes 

■ X'Y Operalion ■ Complele Scheniilrc 

■ VrjSlaga, Tirw, 4 Ffequeftty tMls^ncBs disced 
on CRT ihni tt» use of cursors [Si 365 onlyi 

■ Plus much, much rrort 



-'t't'tftwmtw 

DELUX SERIES 

S-1 330 25MH; S44S 3- 1 345 40M Hz S575 

S^tSeO 60MHz S775 



v-saa 

v-eeo 

V-665A - 60MHi,DT t w^cutsor _ 

V-1D60 ■ 100MHz, Dual Traca 

V-1D65A - 100MHz. DT. wVCufSOr. 
V-1065 ■ 100MM2. QT, WVCufSOf 



_t*9S 

__tS49 

SB5.5 

.11,375 

,$1,449 

$1,549 

$1,695 

$2.TZ5 



Feaiures: 

■ Delayec Sw^ep 

■ Automalic Beam Rnder 

■ Z Axis Modulilson 

■ Buin-in Ccunponant lesi 

■ PJU£ al. ihe tflalvras ol the 'affordable* sef ies 



■ Dual Urns base 

■ Hiuminaiad internal 
g '5 die j -e 



B&K OSCILLOSCOPES 



Si 20 - MM Hz Dual Trace JS6& 

?12S - aOMHz Detayed Sweep SS39 

1 54 1 3 ^ 40MHz Dual Trace &7jg. 

21 &0 - £&MHz Dual Trace, Desa^ea S*eep. 

Dual Tims Base ■$$49 

2iM ■ 100MHz Thfee T^ace Dual Time Base. 

Delayed Sw*ep $1,379 

2522A ■ &0MH2 / ?0MSys Storage $869 




Digital 
Multimeter 

EDM-S3B 

$175,00 

ADmosl every 

'eauire avai!a^« 

Bargain dI 

the decs^e 



ElencoLCR + DMM 
LCM19W 



\2 Fundioris 

r t reqlo4MHz 

Ind-jctancc 

Capacitancd 





3-3.4 Digit Multimeter 
BK-3S0 

$139.00 

• lltOCVaciy 

- Analog bar ?, rg r. -. 

* AuLo/rnanual 'a.nging 

4,000 count LCL> display 

- Crspac-laniii m«as. 

- Temperature probe 




Digital Capacitance 

Meter 

CM-1 555 

$49.95 

- Measures c&Dacir-rs 

Irorr. .ipl lo SfJ.OOOnf 

• 1-1. '2 Digit tCP readout 

wi'h unil indicator 



Digital Multimeter Kit 

with Trainm? Coutsc 

By Elencc 

$49.95 

* F-j|f rurwsion 34 Ranges 
tj .fa large Display ■> lefeaF serial p«(fi*n 
M-2CG1 (Assembled) $55.0(1 





Digital LCR Meter 
$79.95 

*3-1,"2 Dioil LCD Display 

* Indu cteiiiB 1|iHln?CCH 

■ Resistance .1(110 clMi 

*Capaa;aci;c .ipr;o 

Ma? 




Frequency Counter 
$225.00 

* '.; &>gr1 LED dismay 

L Wide measuring ranje 

• l-Hgfi sensfliv-ly 

* Da]» hold lunct •£■■' 

inpul impedanc-e iM^dr 50JCJ 

1Q:1 lopiri ahrer.ua'iion lunation 



mm 



Function Generator 




$239 



Irdacl 

Operation 
Sjcie. Stpjare. Taanc/G. Pulse 
Ramp. .2 to 5MHz, Freq Clr 



FLUKE MULTIMETERS 

(All Models Available Call) 



Scopcmalerj 

Mods: 93 Si, 225 .00 



Wodel -95 
Wode'*7 
ID Series 
Modwl ^0 
Model 12 



£1.649.00 
11,795,00 

$62, 95 
$84.95 



70 Series 
Mode. Tflil 
Mode 7711 
Mode 7911 
OT SerJe* 
Mode' 67 



$6y.9S 
$1 7S.00 
S2B».00 



FM Receiver Kit £ Training Course 
$44.95 



AR2N6 hu.ii 



1.5 tii training tid (ar B«qn>ncfi 
MjK«i m fan mc r»y ro m™ irjgul 
Jin alt uf ufl:0 

< C^vErs. &c1^i 2 mtlEE 1 1 J-s - 
tJBMMii jrj & ffltitr i sa-5J»JHj| 

■ DyJl CCnurS'Cn iUperfHtr.Jjri 




£34.95 AH?NiKXIT 



Butane Soldering Iron 




Two leoii ifl <me r 

lor rmtj d JHE1-S- and !ECfifncian& 



ISOTIP #7§8Q 
£24. &5 




Combination 

Emf/Microwave 
Tester 

EM 204 

Affordable decSromagiHk 

(ELmf) and microwave tests 

made easy! 



Telephone Kit 
PT-a23K 



$14,95 



AvatlaHe 
Asaem&lid 
PT-223 
5" S .35 




j Transistor Radio Kits 

with Training C<mrai 
AM/FM R 9 db 

MadelAM/FH-HM $29.3:5 

AM Radio Kit 

Modal AM-55D $19 95 



Function Generator 

irfSSSW^KSSSK BlOX 

#9600 
By Elefico 

$29.95 

Kit $21 SS 
Sine. Tfiatgit. Squ'fl wave 




Telephone Line Analyzer 




XhTT-JlQQK 119.-3-5. 
Assam bleO TT-4M U6-95 



Learn to Build end Program 
Computers wl1hihi« KM 




MM-aooo 
By Elerwo 

$129.00 



Frt^r scratch ^au twild a Lomplete £ys ■ 
lem. Our Mice-Easier :rainar toaclwi 
you 1o wrila <rno flAMs, POUs and run 
a &Q&S rnnroprocessflr. wtiicl" gses 
5- mil^r THchir; lanttuaqe as I9M PC. 



Electronic Tool Kit 

TK^IMD 
$39.95 




A p r i'sK=.icr a argajuzar lool -.il 
an .ii'i--'?a ; a pfices. incudes 1 5 
high auaMy loolj in a high ftp- 
paoE carrying casn whidT m- 
tudes a pecKfl! lor merer, 



WE WU.L NOT B| "UNDERSOLD 

UPS SHIPPING 18 Sir'A*FS 5'j flThfRS Cfll L 

lUneS:3^d 775=1 IflK 

PROBES IM'CL ALL-SCOPES J. METERS 



C&S SALES IMC. 

150 W.Carpenler Av, ♦ Wheeling. tL 60D90 
FAX: 70B 520-0085 * (70S) 541-0710 



III 




Digital/Analog Trainer 

Complete Mini-Lab For Building, 
Teshng, Proto typing Analog and 

Digital Circuits 
XK-S60 

$169.96 
Kit XK-550-K 



Bamo^ luiiiior a designed rof school 

pf0j*Ct3 1*!*! 5 buHHn power aupplios, 

InOudn a function gararatior w* 

owllimiOira^ varteftile alna, inangular aquaro 

wave lorma. All power wnsr^ion ma ne^jlalad 

and protected agft*?t aHorta. 

ITro ea&o can inrAtde a tull lino ol w™t* and 

mater c1 your choice. 



15 DAY MONEY BACK GUAPANTEF 
FULL FACTORY WARRANTV 
WRITE fOR FRFf CATALOG 




CIRCLE 184 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 51 



73 Review 



Number 13 on your Feedback card 



by Peter J. Bertini K1ZJH 



The Maggiore 

Hi Pro Rl Repeater 

A full-featured repeater at an affordable price. 



Maggiore Electronic Lab 

600 Westtown Road 

Westchester, PA 19382 

voice: (610) 436-6051 

fax:(610)436-6268 

Price classes $589,00 to $1 305.00 



In celebration of their 25th Anniversary, Mag- 
giore Electronics unveiled the new R1 re- 
peater at the 1 995 Dayton Ham Vention. This 
review is based on the unit I received for 
evaluation, a R1 2 meter VHF repeater outfit- 
ted with the optional Computer Automation 
Technologies 300DX controller, and 35- watt 
transmitter. 

This particular configuration is Maggiore's 
model R1VHF35DX and lists for $1,245.00 
for either the 35-waU 144-MHz or 25-watt 
222-MHz repeater. The 20- watt UHF repeater 
with the CAT300DX is $1,305.00. If you al- 
ready own a controller, the R1 ^^^^_ 
pricing starts as low as $589.00 
for a 2 meter 5-watt package. 
Maggiore also offers R1 re- 
peaters with a basic COR 3 ID, 
and timer board starting at 
$650.00. Repeater rack cabinets, 
duplexers, premade cables, pow- 
er supplies, and high-power re- 
peater amplifiers are also offered 
at discounted amateur net pricing. I suggest 
you write or call Maggiore Electronics for a 
catalog or to discuss finding the R1 repeater 
system that meets your exact needs. The R1 
is FCC type-accepted for commercial service. 
The Rl repeater is enclosed in a sturdy 
3.5" high by 9" deep steel custom cabinet in- 
tended for mounting in a standard 19" rack 
cabinet (see Photo A), The cabinet has a 
rugged black epoxy finish with contrasting 



white lettering. The R1 repeater weighs only 
9 pounds. Imagine your club's three 144-, 
222- 1 and 440-MHz repeaters stacked togeth- 
er in less than 12 inches of vertical rack 
space! (Some space should be left between 
R1 repeaters for air circulation if they are 
stacked.) All controls are internal and r once 
set, need no further adjustment. 

Peeking Inside 

The steel enclosure is divided into three 
RF-tigbf compartments (see Photo B) with 
the top cover being an integral part of the 



"Despite its small size you can see 

from the photos that the inside of the 

R1 is stili 'roomy, * with ample space 

for CTCSS hoards, audio delay boards, 

or other accessories. " 



shielding. Fifteen screws secure the top cov- 
er to the R1 repeater enclosure. The liberal 
use of RF feedthrough capacitors help to 
maintain the isolation between the computer 
controller, receiver, and transmitter compart- 
ments. 

Despite its small size you can see from the 
photos that the inside of the R1 is still 
"roomy/" with ample space for CTCSS 
boards, audio delay boards, or other acces- 



sories* The R1 requires 13.8 VDC at 5 amps 
to produce 35 watts, making it an attractive 
candidate for use with alternative power 
sources. 

Maggiore EV1 transmitter 

The EV1 exciter is a real workhorse, The 
power output is 5 watts on 2 meters, but this 
can be reduced by a driver stage trimpot set- 
ting, Maggiore has been using the EV1 ex- 
citer for the past several years, and this cur- 
rent version reflects all of the Improvements 
made to the design. Substantial changes 
■«»«toM have been done to the audio and 
phase modulator stages, making 
it so the R1 has excellent audio. 
The modulator has an input for 
CTCSS tone encoding, 

The oscillator is temperature 
compensated and holds its fre- 
quency to within a few hundred 
cycles. The 35-watt PA (model 
PA\M) mounts on the rear chas- 
sis apron and uses a Motorola MRF 240 tran- 
sistor. The repeater is rated for operation 
over a range of -20 to 60 degrees C. For hot- 
ter climates a R1F fan kit is available. This 
fan is PTT keyed and uses an additional 150 
mA in the transmit mode. The repeater is rat- 
ed for continuous commercial service. Also, 
the black finish on the steel case is a good 
heat emitter, which helps to dissipate the ex- 
cess heat. 




Photo A. The Maggiore Hi Pro Repeater. 



52 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



The Maggiore R4V receiver 

Like the transmitter, the R4V VHF receiver 
is a proven design. All coils are shielded (un- 
like some competitive offerings), resulting in 
minimal unwanted interstage coupling and 
out-of-band responses. This receiver design 
is totally stable. Five lightly coupled tuned 
stages at the operating frequency protect the 
RF and mixer stages from strong adjacent 
commercial transmitters. The first IF is at 
10.7 MHz r Eight poles of crystal filtering fol- 
low the mixer putting the selectivity up front, 
where it belongs. The second IF operates at 
455 kHz. The second LO may operate at ei- 
ther 10.245 or 11155 MHz to resolve l 'b*rdie 1t 
problems at certain frequencies. Repeater 
sites bothered by strong 15-kHz 
adjacent channel users may 
benefit by using the optional 
Murata "E" 455-kHz : 14-pole ce- 
ramic filter for greater IF skirt 
selectivity. An even sharper |; F" 
filter is offered, but DTMF de- 
coding may be adversely affect- ^^_ ^__ 
ed if this narrow bandwidth filter 
is used. 

Trimpots are mounted on the R4V board 
for the volume and squelch settings. The 
squelch threshold is a bit tricky to set; but 
once you find the optimum point, it is ex- 
tremely stable and will require no further ad- 
justment, even over wide variations in supply 
voltage or temperature — a boon when operat- 
ing from gel cell batteries with varying de- 
grees of charge. 

An open collector output is available for the 
COR signal. This open collector may be con- 
figured for low or high activity to meet the re- 
quirements of the controller used. Repeater 
audio for the controller may be taken from the 
discriminator directly (no audio pre-emphasis) 
from the high side of the volume control pot 
(audio pre-emphasis compensated) or from 
the 8-ohm speaker output (audio pre-empha- 
sis compensated and squelch muted). Since 
the CAT controllers employ audio switches 
that follow the COR/COR-CTCSS signals, 
raw receiver audio may be fed directly to the 
controller from any point after the discrimina- 
tor. A CTCSS decoder can directly mute the 
R4V receiver squelch line, or key a controller 
with a CTCSS input. 

Controllers 

As mentioned earlier, you may order the 
R1 without a controller. Maggiore offers an 
economical Hi Pro COR1 board which will 
supply a CW ID and basic repeater timer 
functions. If your club is on a tight budget and 
doesn't need a patch or other frills, it is per- 
haps a good choice. If you want some bells 
and whistles, such as a full-featured au~ 
topatch : voice synthesizer for announce- 
ments and IDs, and other niceties, I recom- 
mend you consider ordering either the CAT- 
300 or CAT-300DX controller with your R1 . 
For the past few years we have been using 
Computer Automation Technologies CAT- 
1000 controllers (sort of a "bigger brother" to 
the CAT-300) on our Three 2 meter Maggiore 
Hi Pro repeaters. I was extremely pEeased to 



see Maggiore Electronics integrate this prod- 
uct line into their repeaters! (For those who 
demand the ultimate in controllers, a match- 
ing enclosure will be forthcoming to house 
the CAT- 1000 for use with the R1 .) 

The CAT-300DX 

The CAT-300 repeater controller has a 
412-word vocabulary for amateur repeater 
operation. This allows the construction of 
voice messages for repeater IDs or special 
club announcements that are stored in a 12- 
position voice message table. An optional 16- 
channel Digital Voice Recorder is also avail- 
able. The CAT-300DX differs from the CAT- 
300 in that a Dallas time chip is added. The 



"Also, the black finish on the 

stee! case is a good heat emitter, 

which heips to dissipate 

the excess heat " 



CAT-300 Dallas chip contains only 2K of 
memory; this is increased to 8K with the 
Dallas time chip in the DX controller. The ad- 
ditional memory allows adding many func- 
tions besides the time feature alone. Memory 
in both versions is nonvolatile, as the Dallas 
chips contain an internal lithium battery back- 
up. I think that the CAT-300DX controller of- 
fers the best value. The CAT-300 may be 
easily upgraded to a CAT-300DX at a later 
date, but the cost will be higher than the ad- 
vertised difference in price. Controller pro- 
gramming is done via DTMF entry, either on 
the phone line or over the air. 

The CAT-300DX has additional autopatch 
capacity and also a 40-position scheduler. 
The scheduler allows full automation of the 
repeater based on the internal clock and cal- 
endar. 

With the CAT-300DX you also get the digi- 



tal voice dock. A digital voice readback of the 
time may be supplied on demand, with IDs, 
patches t voice messages, with scheduled op- 
erations or through the grandfather clock fea- 
ture. The day of the week, day of the month, 
and month are also available as a time vari- 
able. Another time variable is the "saluta- 
tions" greeting, a friendly female voice that 
gives the appropriate "good evening,' 1 "good 
morning/' or 'good afternoon" salutation de- 
pending upon the time of day. 

The full-featured CAT-300 autopatch al- 
lows both manual patches and quick access 
to up to 25 speed dial numbers (100 speed 
dial numbers in the DX.) First digit or 1 tong 
distance lockout protection is provided. Voice 

readback of the entered phone 

number occurs with manual 
patches. The patch can be run 
open or closed access. The CAT 
controllers meet FCC part 15 re- 
quirements and have a part 68 
registration number. 
^_^_ You can save and recall up to 

four unique repeater configura- 
tions in the DX controller. This permits unique 
repeater characteristics (timers, IDs, patch 
availability, etc.) for special events, such as 
during nets or peak traffic hours on the re- 
peaten These memory files can be recaEled, 
modified, and/or saved manually by DTMF 
entry, or scheduled to occur at preset times. 

The CAT300DX offers a powerful macro 
command programming structure, and up to 
10 macros can be stored. Macros can be ex- 
ecuted by DTMF entry, sensing a repeater 
user input condition, via the scheduler, or 
even by another macro. Macros can allow for 
extra long voice messages by stringing sev- 
eral voice messages together, combining 
voice messages with memory file recalls, and 
controlling the user output switches, and per- 
form many other functions. 

Up to eight custom courtesy tones can be 
programmed and saved for future use. Cour- 




Photo B. Peeking Inside the R1 repeater. The R4V receiver is in the left-hand side compart- 
ment: the EV1 exciter and 35-watt PA are mounted in the right-hand side compartment The 
CAT300DX coniroiier is in the center compartment. 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 53 



SAM 



Amateur Radio 
Callsign Database 



Find Hams quickly and easily by Callsign or by 
Name. Search for a specified City, Si ate, or Zip 
Code. Prinl with standard or customized outpul 
Ideal for mailing lists, QSLs etc. NEW FOR '34, 
search fillers that allow you lo specify FIRST NAME, 
LICENSE CLASS, AGE. ADDRESS, or CALL 
SUFFIX, AREA, OR PREFIX 

SAM Option flies include County Cross Reference, 

License Expiration Date, Full Date of Birth, 

Previous Calls and Date First Licensed 

Requ ires IBM Compatible PC, 17,5 MB of hard 

drive space, and high-density floppy drive. 

NOW AVAILABLE ON CD-ROM 

Disk Version $39.95 CD-ROM $39.95 

SAM OPTIONS $7 ,50 each 

Shipping and Handlrng $5.00 

RT SYSTEMS, INC 

B2Q7 STEPHANIE DRIVE, HUNTSVILLE. AL 35802 

1-600-723-6922 or 1-205-682-9292 

Visa. MasterCard or Discover 



HUGE 



100 PAGE 
CATALOG 



\ Communications Receivers 

Portable Receivers 

Scanners 
> Amateur HF Transceivers 

VHF-UHF Transceivers 

HTs and Mobiles 

• Amateur and SWL Antennas 
Accessories and Parts 
RTTY and FAX Equipment 

• Books and Manuals 

This catalog includes prices! 

Send ' 
S1 to 



Universal Radio 

6830 Americana Pkwy. 73 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 

Tsl. 614 866-4267 





^^^^^^ 




. 












■ 








& "■■ ' - ii *■** IM^B 


1 


.■ ■ •-'■-■ . 


3" .._ 

P r^jvm 1 "■ ' 


:'~T""3; 


-■I 


« 






•'<S^f--- • 





DIGITAL FIELD STRENGTH METER 



n 



PS 73 
SIGNAL CUBE"® 

High ParfflnnarToe, Precisian Inslnjffi&Jil 

measures in relative and 

absolute units 



* Relative measurement from 60 Hz to Ihe GHz range and. 
absolute measurements from 1 MHz to 100 MHz. 
(Broad band with no tuning adjusimeni). 

* Adjustable length dipole antenna sets required sensitivity 
(At high gai-rt settings, ambient R .F. fields from local 
sources will indicate on the display). 

• Dipole antenna eliminates need for a counterpoise, 
(A single antenna type field strength meter utilizes the 
person hoEding the unit as the counterpoise). 

• Consistent and repeatable readings can be obtained 
with the Nye Engineering unit since it is not necessary for 
the observer to hold or be in close proximity to The meter. 

• A heavy duty cast aluminum, gasketed cubical enclosure 
is used, it does not easily tip over. 

* The "SIGNAL CUBE"* is factory calibrated to a standard 
for both absolute and relative measurements. 

NYE ENGINEERING CO. INC. 

4020 Gait Ocean Drive Suite #606 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 3330S 



Made m USA 



, 



S.i 



VGA 



I 



Phone: 305-56G-3&97 
Fbk: 305-537-3534 



$169 

plus $5.00 shipping 




yqub source 

FOB 



BA TTERIES! 



* AMA TEUR RADIO BA TTERY PACKS 

* REPLACEMENT RECHARGEABLE INSERTS 

* LAPTOP COMPUTER BATTERIES 

* DISTRIBUTOR OF SANYO A// CD CELLS 

* CAMCORDER BATTERY PACKS 

* CELL ULAR PHONE BA TTER Y PACKS 

* SEALED LEAD«ACtD BA TTERIES 

* OEM, & CUSTOM ASSEMBLY PACKS 



Calf or write for our free catalog! 



EM. Yost & Company 

7344 TelivaHd.- Sauk Ditv.WJ 535S5 
Phone IGQai 831 3443 / Fax 13083 8 31-1082 
DEALERMQUIRIESJNVITED 

^ m 1km. i w J* i -— ■ ■ 



CIRCLE 1 14 ON READER SERVICE CARO 



MORSE CODE MUSIC! 



SENSATIONAL NEW WAY TO LEARN 
CODE— Do Aerobics, Sing, Jog, or Drive 

while learning code! A fun & easy way to 
learn or retain Morse Code skihs. Now the 
secret is yours with this amazing syncronized 
breakthrough! Great fun tape for all licenses 
and classrooms! Order: 

THE RHYTHM OF THE CODE" 

Version 2 cassette today! 

Send $9.95 and include $2,00 SfH to: 

KAWA RECORDS 

P.O. Box 31 9-ST 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Check or money order only. We ship all orders within 5 days, 
MA residents add 5% sales lax. 



CIRCLE 2 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



DSP AUDIO FILTERS 

FINALLY HEAR WEAK SIGNALS 

Authorized JPS Dealer—do not accept JPS donestl Note; 
Unlike competitors. NIR-10 and MM 2 filters both impulse & 
atmospheric noise. Local electrical noise? It so, u&e ANC4. 
WHOLESALE PRICING: JPS N I R- 12-5299. 95. NIR- 
10-1259.95, NRF 7-$199.95 ANC-4-S1S5, NTR-1 $149,95, 
Full Satisfaction Warranty, Fastest Processor Available. 
Immediate delivery. 12 Veil 1 Amp PS: $14.95 s&hr $5.50 Ltd. 

ROPE ROPE ROPE 

ROPE ANTENNA/TOWER SUPORTSt WHY RISK COSTLY 
FAILURES?? DOUBLE D AC RON vs our competitors 1 single, 
UV resis. Mill Type fclack 3/32" (260#); Btfft, 3/16* (770#): 
110/ft. 5/16(1770*): l6c/fL $1.50 if spooled, sSh: $4.95 ltd. 
Club Discounts. 1 .000 ft discounts. 



DAVIS RF CO. 

PO Box 230 S 
C arlisle, MA 0174 1 

( DAVIS RV ) 



24 HOUR ORDERS 

1-800-328-4773 

TECH/fNFO: 

1 -508-369 -t 733 



Commercial Wire/cable 
Please Call uur 300 fl 



CIRCLE 290 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




U.IT»1« 




Dealers for Kenwood, Yaesu, I com, 

Cushcraft, AEA, Kantronics, 

Bencher, Diamond, Astron, MFJ, 

Hustler, Ameritron, Larsen, ARRL, 

and more,,, 
Service is also available, 

Get jour best price 
then call us LAST?/ 

(801) 567-9494 - (800) 942-8873 

7946 South State Street 

Midvale, UT 84047 



CIRCLE 156 ON READER SERVICE CAFlD 



tesy tones can consist of up to three different 
tone frequencies of various lengths and sepa- 
rations, IDs can be done in CW or voice. 

Two hardware Input and three user-func- 
tion output switches are available- The out- 
puts control external devices such as power 
amps, etc. The inputs can be used for tem- 
perature or burglar alarm sensing, an SWR 
alarm, etc, For example, you could write a 
macro that upon detection of a high SWR 
would disconnect the power amp, give a digi- 
tal voice announcement warning the control 
operators of the failure, and have the re- 
peater switch to a memory file that requires 
CTCSS access and a unique courtesy tone! 

The controller can operate as an "open" re- 
peater, or CTCSS or DTMF access can be 
turned on. You will need to supply a CTCSS 
board such as the Communication Specialists 
model TS-32. This can be installed by Mag- 
giore as an option. The TS-32 also allows si- 
multaneous transmitter CTCSS encoding and 
receiver CTCSS decoding. You can also have 
the repeater run "open access" for a prede- 



"I am pleased with the 

Maggiore R1 repeater— 

in appearance, quality, 

and performance. 



77 



termined time interval upon detection of the 
proper CTCSS or DTMF sequence to allow 
transients access to the repeater once it is in 
use, Or, control operator DTMF control func- 
tions can be protected by requiring the proper 
CTCSS tone for their acceptance. The key-up 
delay timer and the inactivity "sleep" timer 
(and all other timers) are remotely pro- 
grammable. 

Conclusion 

I am pleased with the Maggiore R1 re- 
peater—in appearance, quality, and perfor- 
mance. Frank has been able to offer this re- 
peater at this low price with no sacrifice in 
quality due to the time he has spent in de- 
signing the enclosure. These repeaters can 
be constructed in a fraction of the time it 
takes him to assemble some of his other 
models. Savings represented by the Jack of 
unneeded frills {front panel speaker, knobs, 
custom die cast aluminum boxes, etc.) are all 
passed onto the buyer Note that the "meat- 
and-potatoes" of the Maggiore R1 repeater, 
the R4V receiver and EV1 exciter, are 
the same as used in the most expensive 
Maggiore commercial repeater systems! The 
marriage of the CAT series of controllers with 
the Maggiore repeater is also something I 
have long awaited. You could easily spend 
twice the cost of the deluxe R1VHF35DX re- 
peater package for a competitor's controller 
alone! Both Maggiore and Computer Automa- 
tion are good people with whom to do busi- 
ness, the owners being accessible for consul- 
tation or advice and having established a 
proven reputation for customer support and 
satisfaction. 



54 73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 



^fe Number 14 on yoi 

Carrs corner 



Number 14 on your Feedback card 



Joseph J. Oarr K4IPV 

P.O. Box 1099 

Fatts Church VA 22041 



Experimenting with the 
NE-602 Converter Chip 

The Signetics NE-602 integrat- 
ed circuit (see Figure 1) is a nifty 
little device that contains an oscil- 
lator stage and a Wilson 
Transconductance Cefl Double 
Balanced Modulator (DBM). 
These features make the NE-602 
a radio frequency "front-end" in a 
single package. Various people 
have used the NE-602 as a fre- 
quency converter, superhetero- 
dyne receiver front-end, product 
detector, and direct conversion 
receiver. 

It will operate normally at po- 
tentials from +4,5 VDC to +8 
VDC T although you can extend 
the operating range by using a 
voltage regulator (see Figure 2). 
Most applications seem to call for 
+5 to +6.8 VDC. The V+ is ap- 
plied to pin No, 8, and ground rs 
connected to pin No. 3. Both the 
V+ line (pin No. 8) and the V+ 
source are bypassed with capaci- 
tors. You can calculate the resis- 











V+ 

OSC Emitter 

OSC Base 
OUT2 












3 

7 

6 

- 5 


IN1 


1 


— 


DBM 




VREG 
I 








IN2 

GND 

OUT1 


2 

3 

4 




I 




Osc 































Ftgurel.The NE-602 interna! block diagram. 



tor value (R1) by taking the differ- 
ence between the V+ source volt- 
age and the desired operating 
voltage, when the current drain is 
about 2.6 mA (i.e., Ohm's law). 

The oscillator circuit has two 
terminals to the outside world; 
One is the base of the oscillator 
transistor (pin No. 6), while the 
other is the emitter of the oscilla- 
tor transistor (pin No. 7). The os- 
cillator operates up to 200 MHz. 

The heart of the NE-602 is the 
DBM. There are two inputs form- 
ing a balanced pair (pins 1 and 
2), although in most cases the 
signal is applied to pin No, 1 and 
pin No. 2 is bypassed to ground 
with a 0,04 to 0.1 nF capacitor. 
The output is also balanced, and 
appears on pins 4 and 5, You can 
use either pin to output a signal 
or they can be used as a bal- 
anced pair. 

The NE-602 will provide quite 
good sensitivity, although the 
dynamic range performance suf- 
fers a bit. The NE-612 device is 
an upgraded NE-602 , but seems 
a little hard to come by in the 
ham and hobbyist markets. 

NE-602 Convert- 
er Circuit 

The front end 
of the radio re- 
ceiver consists of 
the RF amplifier 
(if used) and the 
converter or mix- 
er/LO stages. 
The basis for our 
designs wilt be 
the Signetics NE- 
602 balanced 
mixer integrated 



C2 
1 uF 



-) 



U2 

78xxor 

LM-34G-XX 



1uF 



^ 



R1 
(See Text J 



V+ 
S +9 to 

+28 VDC 



C3 
1 uF 



8 



U1 
NE-602 



Figure 2. DC power supply for> +9 VDC applications. 



o+9 Vdc 



C4 
Main Tune 

T1 



RF 
Input 



1 



C3 >t 




F2Qut 






Figure 3. NE-602 frequency converter. 



circuit (IC). Although this device 
has limited dynamiG range, it is 
sufficient for our purposes be- 
cause it compensates with a bet- 
ter than average noise figure and 
sufficient conversion gain so that 
an RF amplifier is not needed in 
most projects. 

Figure 3 shows a simple fre- 
quency converter circuit based on 
the NE-602 IC. It can also be 
used as the front-end of a super- 
heterodyne receiver, with the out- 
put (F2) being the desired IF fre- 
quency, The output impedances 
of the NE-602 are compatible 
with most crystal and mechanical 
f titers used for IF selectivity. 

The input side of the circuit 
shown in Figure 3 uses a tuned 
circuit consisting of the sec- 
ondary winding of T1, and is res- 
onated by the parallel combina- 
tion of C2, C3, and C4. The tuned 
circuit must resonate at the de- 
sired RF frequency using an in- 
ductor that is not loaded too 
much when shunted by the 1 P 500 
ohm input resistance of the DBM. 

You can broadband the input 





4 






Ut 
NE-602 




5 ^ 


i 




_ C 

^ 1 


1 




uF 









circuit by using an RF transformer 
built on a toroid powdered iron 
form, rather than the tuned circuit. 
The ratio L2/L1 is typically 10:1 to 
12:1; that is, there are also 10 to 
12 turns on LZ for every turn on 
L1. Experiments and published 
data indicate that good starting 
numbers are 20 to 24 turns on l_2, 
with 2 to 3 turns on L1 for fre- 
quencies in the upper shortwave 
region. As frequency is de- 
creased, the number of turns is 
increased to about 34 to 40 turns 
on L2 at the AM broadcast band. 

The capacitors and the 100- 
ohm resistor in the V+ circuit 
(connected to pin 8 of the NE- 
602) are used for isolation and 
decoupling. These components 
prevent RF in the NE-602 circuit 
from traveling to other stages in 
the radio via the DC power line 
or p alternatively, prevent signals 
from other stages from modulat- 
ing the converter stage (or possi- 
bly causing oscillations). 

The oscillator circuit in Figure 3 
consists of the components at- 
tached to pins 6 and 7 of the NE- 
602 EC. In this case, a crystal os- 
cillator is used, although a vari- 
able frequency oscillator could al- 
so be used. The operating fre- 
quency of the Jocal oscillator sec- 
tion is set by the resonant fre- 
quency of crystal XTAL1 . This fre- 
quency should be the RF fre- 
quency plus or minus the desired 
F2 output frequency, or 



XTAL 



= F RF ± F2 



0) 



Fig. 4. Direct conversion output circuit 
for NE-602. 



The capacitor values used for the 
crystal oscillator are: 



Continued on page 59 
73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 55 



Ask kaboom 



Number 15 on your Feedback card 



Michael J > GeierKBWM 
c/o 73 Magazine 
70 Route 202 North 
Peterborough NH 03458 



More Spectral Thinking 

Last time, we were discussing 
the difference between the time 
and frequency domains. As we 
explored, the time domain is the 
familiar one we experience day to 
day: Things change over a period 
of time. In the frequency domain, 
though, things that change over 
time also change their rate of 
change! Let's continue: 

Seeing Is Believing 

We were examining the spec- 
trum analyzer, one of the most 
useful, and least available, instru- 
ments to the RF experimenter. 
They're not generally available 
because they cost too much, al- 
though that's slowly starting to 
change for the better. Why are the 
darned things so expensive? 
Well, a spectrum analyzer is 
much more complex than an os- 
cilloscope, which is already not 
such a cheap beast. In fact, the 
analyzer is a combination of a 
scope, a swept filter, and the nec- 
essary controls and sweep cir- 
cuits to tie them together. Also, in 
order to capture a signal's har- 
monics, the analyzer has to have 
at least three times the upper fre- 
quency limit of the signal you're 
trying to examine. So, to be us- 
able on our 144 MHz, 2 meter 
band, you need at least 700 MHz 
of response, preferably more. 
That kind of stuff doesn't come 
cheap! 

Commercial spectrum analyz- 
ers typically cost $1500 and up, 
often way into the thousands of 
dollars If you've already got a 
scope, it may seem like needless 
duplication to buy another instru- 
ment that is also based upon a 
scope. Yes, you can buy an 
adapter for your scope, and it will 
cost much I ess j thanks to the fact 
that it need not include its own 
scope circuits and CRT, Still, a 
decent analyzer is not a cheap 
thing, even if you go that route. 
Should you own one? Sure, if you 
buiid transmitters and can afford 
the cost. Do you really need one? 
Usually, you can get by without it T 
but an analyzer can be invaluable 



Your Tech Answer Man 

in tuning RF output stages and 
setting up repeaters, not to men- 
tion sniffing out stubborn intermod 
and other interference cases, 
Whether you can afford one or 
not (I can't!), it still pays to under- 
stand how to use one; you never 
know when you might be called 
upon to operate somebody else's 
unit. Besides, the more you know 
. . . well, the more you know, 
right? 

Getting Started 

As with an oscilloscope, setting 
up a spectrum analyzer is much 
easier if you have some idea of 
what you're trying to see in the 
first place. 1 suppose that's true of 
any measuring instrument; even 
an autoranging DMM needs to be 
set for AC, DC, or ohms, right? 
With the analyzer, you need to set 
a frequency span that corre- 
sponds to what you're looking for. 
A "center frequency'' control does 
Just what it sounds like: It sets the 
center of the span wherever you 
want it. That may be the same 
frequency as your input signal, or 
it may be above it, letting the in- 
put be near the bottom of the 
span so that you can see harmon- 
ics farther up. But, just as a scope 
has a variable horizontal rate, a 
spectrum analyzer has a variable 
span width, In other words, do 
you want to see 100 to 120 MHz T 
or 50 to 250 MHz? The wider 
spans let you see much more, but 
with less resolution at any given 
point, just as when you set your 
scope for a slow horizontal scan 
rate. On an analyzer, the control 
is called "dispersion." Setting a 
narrower dispersion, though, lets 
you see much more detail, at the 
cost of getting only a narrower 
slice of spectrum on the screen. 

When you begin, you'll proba- 
bly want to set the dispersion con- 
trol for a fairly wide span, espe- 
cially if you're looking for the har- 
monic content of your signal. Re- 
member, the third harmonic will 
be at three times the operating 
frequency, so you'd better look far 
and wide. By the way. that's also 
why you cant use a spectrum an- 
alyzer to much advantage when 
your input frequency is anywhere 
near the upper frequency limit of 
the analyzer; you can't see the 
harmonics because they're above 
the limit. Luckily, most analyzers 



have limits above 1 GHz, making 
them useful at VHF and, to some 
degree, at UHR 

]f you're looking for spurs or 
other signals much nearer your 
operating frequency, then you can 
narrow the dispersion control 
down, limiting the width of your 
view of the spectrum and giving 
you much more detail. Now you 
can clearly see the modulation 
around your carrier frequency, 
along with any nearby spurs or, 
perhaps, signals coming from oth- 
er sources that could be causing 
intermod problems. 

Get Vertical 

What about the amplitude scale 
on the analyzer? How the heck do 
you look at a signal putting per- 
haps a milliwatt into the analyzer, 
and still see the tiny 3 microvolt- 
level signals that could surround 
it? That would lake a phenomenal 
dynamic range that, in this case, 
translates to a screen several feet 
high! Essentially, you're stuck with 
the same problem that occurs in 
the horizontal direction: the trade- 
off between size and resolution. 
Here, though, there's no easy 
way out. If you scale down the 
vertical response, you can see 
the size of your incoming signal, 
but you won't see the tiny signals; 
they'll be too small to deflect the 
CRT's beam in the vertical direc- 
tion, and most likely will look like 
a flat line, indicating nothing at ail. 
If. however, you crank the vertical 
up, your input signal's main indi- 
cation will go way off the top of 
the scale. The little signals, 
though, will be brought up enough 
in amplitude to be seen. Is that 
bad? 

Fake It 

Not necessarily. It does allow 
you to see what you want. It also, 
however, has two negative side 
effects. First, it prevents you from 
taking a visual measurement to 
compare the strengths of the car- 
rier and adjacent signals. Sure, 
you can measure the carrier first, 
then crank up the gain, and lastly 
add the number of decibels you 
can no longer see, getting the 
number to add from the marking 
on the vertical amplitude control. 
Sounds messy, and it is! The sec- 
ond problem is even worse: When 
you crank up the input gain, 
you're likely to overload the input 
of the analyzer, because your in- 
put signal is now just too strong. 
That can cause false readings of 
spurious signals, because they're 
really being generated in the ana- 



lyzer's overloaded front end. Clip- 
ping is clipping, no matter where it 
happens, and it'll cause splatter 
and distortion products that show 
up on the screen just as if your 
transmitter had caused them; 
they'll be indistinguishable from 
the real thing, rendering the mea- 
surements useless. Is there a way 
out? 

Match 

Sure. Most analyzers have a 
special control that lets you set up 
a notch filter on your input fre- 
quency. Why do that? Well, now 
you can reduce the input strength 
of your primary signal, by a cali- 
brated amount, but only on its 
fundamental frequency That per- 
mits the other, adjacent frequen- 
cies and more distant harmonics 
to be unaftenuated, and you can 
crank up the gain much higher 
without causing any overload. 
The result is that, although the 
display is no longer telling you the 
whole truth, you can see every- 
thing you want. All you have to do 
is add the attenuation value in dB, 
read from the notch filter's knob, 
to the displayed amplitude of the 
fundamental frequency, and 
you've got the true value of the 
fundamental, which lets you easi- 
ly compute things like carrier-to- 
noise ratio and how far down the 
harmonics are. That's how those 
specs on our radios get mea- 
sured. So, the notch is an impor- 
tant feature. Basically, lhafs all 
there is to know in order to use a 
spectrum analyzer for most tasks. 

Other Uses 

To tune a transmitter's output 
stage, you adjust its trimcaps and 
coils for the most power, right? 
Oddly, though, what looks like the 
most power on a wattmeter may 
actually be spread across various 
frequencies, thanks to distortion 
in the waveform. Wattmeters 
aren't sharply frequency sensitive, 
so they don't know where, spec- 
trally, the energy is occurring. In 
fact, they're designed to be as fre- 
quency insensitive as possible. 
Remember, anything other than a 
sine wave will have power in 
more than one place in the spec- 
trum. What you really want is the 
most power on the fundamental 
frequency, consistent with the 
least power anywhere else. While 
that may seem obvious, it isn't al- 
ways strictly true! For instance, in 
a radio covering a wide frequency 
span, you may need to tune it for 
equivalent output power at the ex- 
treme ends of the span; tuning for 



56 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 



maximum at any one point could 
cause the power at either end to 
be way too low, or even for spuri- 
ous signals to appear, due to mis- 
tuning. And, in the case of a wide* 
band transmitter such as an ATV 
unit or high-speed digital link, you 
may need to tune for equal output 
power within a defined portion of 
tire unit's coverage— as always, of 
course, consistent wtth minimum 
power elsewhere. 

What about receivers? With the 
right input signal, alignment of IF 
stages can really be eased with a 
spectrum analyzer. Unlike with 
transmitter alignment, you don't 
have a handy signal emanating 
from the receiver, Just connecting 
the analyzer to the IF output won't 
do you much good, because the 
results will depend quite a bit on 
what's coming in at the antenna 
jack. But, if you feed the receiver 
with a wideband noise signal while 
you're connected to the IF output, 
then you can see how the IF filter- 
ing affects the shape of the pass- 
band. For aligning wideband re- 
ceivers like ATV units, this tech- 
nique Is invaluable, and TV shops 
used to do something very similar 
with a swept signal generator and 
an oscilloscope synchronized to it. 



In effect, they had formed a crude 
spectrum analyzer from other 
equipment 

Even in regular voice radios, 
setting up with an analyzer can 
show you things you couldn't oth- 
erwise see. If you feed the receiv- 
er with a single-frequency carrier 
signal, you can turn up the input 
level until the receiver overloads 
and then see how that affects the 
IF output. Or, you can connect Ihe 
spectrum analy2er to the output of 
the first mixer before the first filter, 
and see what intemncd products 
you get and at what input level. If 
you're designing receivers or trou- 
bleshooting a stubborn intermod 
case, knowing the overload point, 
and its effects on the circuit, can 
be crucial. 

I hope you've enjoyed this peek 
at spectral issues and spectrum 
anaJyzers. Before we go, let's look 
at a letter: 

Dear K a boom, 

Why does my old tube 
transceiver's receiver actually 
sound better than my newer, solid- 
state, synthesized, whiz-bang rig? 
Shouldn't the new stuff be better? 
Signed, Quizzical. 

Ah, a question relevant to this 



month's topic! There are two rea- 
sons your new rig may not sound 
as "clean" as old faithful. First, the 
old rig almost certainly doesn't 
have the sensitivity of the newer 
one, so you're hearing less band 
noise, QRN, and weak-signai 
QRM, Most of today's radios are 
way more sensitive than they have 
to be r or perhaps even should be. 
Really, who actually works sta- 
tions buried in noise below S-1? 
Even if you do hear them, 
chances are they won't hear you! 
Besides, stations witn better paths 
to them will undoubtedly be occu- 
pying their time. Most rigs have an 
attenuator button, which can help 
reduce the mess by putting some 
of it below the receiver's noise 
floor, but people seem afraid to 
use it, lest their S*meters read 
lower Its silly; rf rt sounds better, 
go with ttf 

The second reason is harder to 
fix. Nonsynthesized radios have 
crystal-controlled oscillators, 
mixed with variable analog VFOs, 
controlling their operating frequen- 
cies. For all its limitations of drift 
and lack of memory capability, that 
old technology had the virtue of 
being spectrally cleaner than many 
synthesizers! Phase-locked loop 



(PLL) synthesis involves the con- 
stant correction of an oscillator by 
a digital control system, it works 
great, and offers the long-term sta- 
bility of the digital system's timing 
crystal, which is much, much bet- 
ter than can be achieved with ana* 
log oscillators. But t the short-term 
stability is much worse, because 
the oscillator must start to wander 
a little before the digital controller 
can correct it. So, it's constantly 
wandering around and being read* 
justed, ever so slightly. That ere* 
ates an effect called "phase 
noise," which is just a fancy way of 
saying that the oscillator has ran- 
dom modulation on it. It's small, 
but it's there, and It leads to a 
slightly fuzzy quality in the receiv- 
er, as well as on your transmitted 
signal, Newer rigs employing di- 
rect digital synthesis, in which the 
local oscillator signals are directly 
built up from digital pulses in CD- 
player style, are much cleaner, let- 
ting you enjoy the best of both 
worlds. I mention that all this is rel- 
evant to our topic because phase 
noise is a frequency-domain phe- 
nomenon, and can best be seen 
on a spectrum analyzer! 

See you all next month. 73 de 
KB1UIYL 




Sewing the LORD 
Since 7937 




THE POWER STATION 

The POWER STATION is a 12V x 7 AmpHr gel-cell 
battery complete with voltmeter, wall charger and a 
cord for charging via automobiles. It will power most 
HTs at 5 Watts for 2-4 weeks {depending upon how long-winded you 
are). Also VHF, UHF, GRP, or HF mobiles such as the KENWOOD TS-50 
(at SOW). There are no hidden costs, all you need is your mobile, HT 
power cord or cigarette lighter adapter 

The POWER STATION provides 12V from a cigarette plug and has two 
recessed terminals for hardwiring, A mini-phone jack with regulated 3V, 
6V, or 9V output can be used separately for CD players, Walkmans, etc, 
THE POWER STATION can be charged in an automobile in only 3 hours, 
or in the home in 8 hours. The charger will automatically shut off when the 
battery is completely charged, so you can charge it even when it has only 
been slightly discharged, {unlike Ni-Cads that have memory), Our charg- 
ing circuit uses voltage sensing circuitry, other brands are timed chargers 
which always charge the battery a full cycle, this damages their battery 
and shortens its' life if it only needs a partial charge. The POWER STATION 
has a voltmeter that shows the exact state of charge of the battery, not 
worthless idiot lights that ted you "YOUR BATTERY IS NOW DEAD/* The 
voltmeter can even be used to measure voltages of other sources. 




To order, send check or money order for $49.95 + 
S8,50 for shipping, aJong with your shipping address 
and telephone number to: 

Joe Brancato 

THE HAM CONTACT 

P.O. Box 3624, Dept. 73 
Long Beach, CA 90803. 

CA Residents Add 8 1/4% Sales Tax. Alaska, Hawaii, and Candian 
Residents, please send U.S. Mafiey Order & Si 7 10 Shipping, 

ff you wish mote tnformaikm pfease send a SASE to the aoove Address For 
COD orders, caf (3m 433-5860. outeute o* CA Orders wily caJl (800) 933- 
HAM4 and leave a message. Dealer Inquires invited. 




CIRCLE 3*4 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 57 



Hams ats 



Number 16 on your Feedback card 



Amateur Radio Via Satellites 



Andy MacAiiister WA5ZIB 
14714 Knights Way Drive 
Houston TX 77083 

The Shuttle and MIR 

When the Space Shuttle At- 
tantis went to orbit this summer 
on mission STS-71. changes 
were needed for the Shuttle Am- 
ateur Radio Experiment 
(SAREX) program. The primary 
goal of STS-71 was to dock suc- 
cessfully with the Russian MIR 
space station. The mission was 
accomplished. It was a historic 



first for both programs as the At- 
lantis and MIR came together 

For SAREX planners it was al- 
so a success, but several 
changes in ham-radio activity 
planning were required. Both the 
Shuttle and MIR have shared 
145.55 MHz for ham activities. 
The cosmonauts on MIR use the 
frequency for simplex voice and 
packet operations. For the astro- 
nauts on the Atlantis it is the pri- 
mary downlink for general voice 
and packet activity. During STS- 
63 last year, the Space Shuttle 



Discovery and MIR performed 

an approach test. The two 
spacecraft did not dock, but 
were very close for maneuver tri- 
als. Everything went well tor a 
productive mission, but some dif- 
ficulties were noted with using 
145.55 MHz for both MIR and 
the Shuttle. MiR was running 
packet with the onboard 2 meter 
rig. Terminal Node Controller 
(TNC)> and outside antenna. On 
the Shuttle SAREX operations 
included a Motorola radio and 
window antenna. Signals from 
the Shuttle were much weaker 
than those from MIR Whenever 
the packet system on MIR trans- 
mitted, the Shuttle voice down- 
link was covered up. The win- 
dow antenna on the Shuttle 
could not compete with the sig- 




Photo A. The Russian MIR space statton wrtft a Soyuz craft about to dock. 



nal from MiR, Therefore, a 
change was needed. 

The SAREX working group 
and AMSAT. the Radio Amateur 
Satellite Corporation, selected a 
new set of frequencies for use 
during future Shuttle- MiR dock- 
ing missions. The new downlink 
was to be 145,84 MHz for gener- 
al ham operations from the Shut- 
tle. Two uplinks were also cho- 
sen; 144.45 and 144,47 MHz. 
During STS-71 the new frequen* 
cies were in use. but due to the 
intense level of operations asso- 
ciated with the docking proce- 
dures, there were few general 
contacts during the mission. Al- 
so, due to the lack of packet 
gear in conjunction with the Mo- 
torola radio (the primary use is 
ShuMe-MIR communications in 
the 121 MHz area), little was 
heard by earthbound enthusi- 
asts. Unfortunately, future mis- 
sions involving docking activities 
will likely have limited general 
ham-contact operation. The nex! 
SAREX use of the Motorola ra- 
dio will come in October with the 
scheduled flight of Atlantis and 
mission STS-74. With Ken 
Cameron KB5AWP as Comman- 
der and Mission Specialist, and 
SAREX enthusiast Bill McArthur 
KC5ACR onboard, more general 
QSOs are possible. Keep tuned 
to 145.84 MHz and don't forget 
to listen for Shuttle downlink sig- 
nals on other frequencies during 
passes that may involve sched- 
uled school contacts. 

MIR Activity 

The core module of the MtR 
Space Station was launched in 
1986, It has six docking units, 
which can receive up to six 
space vehicles the same size as 





Photo B. Serget U5MfR and Musa U2MIR (with naming microphone) on MIR 
(USMtR photo) 

58 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 



Photo C. Serget Knkaiev U5MIR does some soldering on MIR (U5MIR photo) 



itself. In addition to manned 
Soyuz crafts, unmanned 
Progress cargo ships dock with 
MIR to replenish supplies. The 
docking units were designed 
specifically for the Russian 
space program, and differ from 
those used during the Soyuz- 
Apollo mission of the mid-70s. In 
order to dock with MfR t NASA 
needed to provide the required, 
compatible hardware on the 
Shuttle. 

Interest in the MIR Space Sta- 
tion has increased since the 
docking activities of mission 
STS-71. Another positive result 
of the Shuttle-MR docking mis- 
sions is the increased interest in 
ham radio contacts with the cos- 
monauts aboard MfR. They have 
been active on 145.55 MHz FM 
simplex for many years. During a 
pass, voice, two-way packet, or 
packet BBS signals may be 
heard. Since the days of Musa 
U2MJR and Sergei U5MIFL many 
hams T including astronaut Norm 
Thaggard, using the call ROMIR, 



have been active on 2 meters 
from MIR. Sergei, on the other 
hand, has also flown on the 
Shuttle and has spent over two 
years in Houston for training and 
other activities. 

During times of low activity 
from MfR, many have wondered 
if the crew was busy with on- 
board experiments! conserved 
power, or was just disinterested 
in ham activity. During most of 
these ham radio lapses the 2 
meter ham rig has been in use 
for nonamateur communications 
outside the 2 meter band. This 
may soon change. A new 2 me- 
ter rig n TfMC, and antenna are to 
be sent to MfR, This will allow 
one station to be used for the 
mission-specific work with 
Moscow, while the other can be 
dedicated to ham activities. This 
promises to be an exciting im- 
provement for both the cosmo- 
nauts and hams on the ground. 
As before, the primary frequency 
for ham work will be 145.55 
MHz. The orbiting packet bui- 




Photo D, Sergei U5MIR with wife, daughter and Rita VK3CFI at the Johnson 
Space Center Amateur Radio dub Christmas dinner in Houston, Texas. 

letin-board system (PBBS) has al voice contact with MIR crew 
been both interesting and useful members is always an excep- 
tor al! involved and the occasion- tional experience. 




CARR'S corner 



C7= 1<XV(F MH fc)i* (2) 

and 

C8= 1000/ F MH j> (3) 

When making calculations for 
resonance or C7 and C8, allow 
about 10 pF for stray circuit ca- 
pacitances. 

The output of the NE-602 must 
be tuned to either the desired 
other frequency (F2) or the de- 
sired IF (that is, the difference be- 
tween the received RF signal and 
the LO signal) by a tuned IF 
transformer (T1 in Figure 3). In 
most receiver projects, this differ- 
ence frequency should be 455 
kHz, 9 MHz, or 10.7 MHz, de- 
pending on application because 
of the easy availability of the coils 
and crystal filters. 

Several sources offer coils, but 
perhaps the easiest to obtain are 
the Toko-brand coils marketed by 
Digi-Key (P.O. Box 677 f Thief 
River Falls, MN 56701-0677; 1- 
800-344-4539), 

Direct Conversion Receivers 

You can use the NE^602 chip 
as a direct conversion receiver 
In this type of circuit, the LO 
operates on the same frequency 
as the received RF signal for AM 



Continued from page 55 

reception, and slightly offset for 
single- sideband— SSB (2,7 
kHz)— reception. As a result, 
when the RF signal and LO sig- 
nal are zero beat, the difference 
IF is the audio modulating the in- 
coming carrier. In CW reception, 
the LO is tuned to a frequency a 
few hundred hertz from the in- 
coming RF. In that case, the dif- 
ference frequency will be a beat 
note that is interpreted as a CW 
signal. 

To make a direct conversion 
receiver, simply replace the out- 
put network in Figure 1 with an 
audio transformer, and then fol- 
low it with a high-gain audio am- 
plifier (see Figure 4), 

You can use the NE-602 de- 
vice for a wide variety of receiver, 
conversion, and other frequency 
translation problems. It can also 
be used as an oscillator or RF 
signal generator by connecting 
the oscillator circuit, as normal, 
and then connecting a 10k-ohm 
resistor from pin No, 1 to ground 
(and a 0.047 jiF to ground from 
pin No. 2). 

I can be reached for com- 
ments, questions, and criticisms 
at RO. Box 1099, Falls Church, 
VA 22041. 





PC HF Fax Plus $129 

PC HF Fax Plus is a simple, yet 

comprehensive HF system thai 
receives Fax n RTTY, CW, and 
AMTOR on an IBM PC or 
compatible. It includes an FSK 
demodulator, advanced signal 
processing software, tutorial 
audio cassette, and complete 
reference manual. Just plug 
the demodulator into a serial 
port, install the software and 
get text and vivid images on 
your PC. 




PC SSTV $149.95 

PC Slow Scan Television is a 
complete system for sending 
and receiving full color amateur 
SSTV. The package includes 
an SSTV FSK modem, SSTV 
software, image capture 
utilities and reference manual, 
All popular formats are 
supported including Robot, 
Scottie, Martin and AVT. The 
system requires a 286, 3£6 or 
faster PC with VGA or super 
VGA display. 



Have It All For Only $199.95 

For a limited time we are offering both software packages with a single FSK modem 
for under $200, This combination offer will lei you send and receive the popular HF 
image and text iransmission modes. 

Call or write for our free catalog. Visa and Mastercard welcomed. 



615 S. El Camino Real, San Clemente, CA 92672 
Tel.(714) 498-5784 Fax.(714) 498-0568 



CIRCLE 250 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 59 



Rtty loop 



Number 17 on your Feedback card 



Marc I Leavey M.D., WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Baltimore MD 27200 

Last month I highlighted one of 
the many sites on the Internet of 
interest to radio amateurs, the 
GRZ Home Page. I have been a 
bit taken aback by the reaction to 
this information, with the number 
of requests for more such sites, 
WeN, the Internet is literally 
crawling with ham radio sites. 
That should not surprise you, giv- 
en the nature of the Internet, and 
that hams have traditionally been 
in the forefront of innovative com- 
munication. 

Ham Radio in Cyberspace 

To begin, let's take a look at 
one of the services that can 
search out sites on the Net* The 

Galaxy site is one such service. 
Amateur Radio is under their 
Leisure and Recreation section, 
and setting your web browser to: 
http ://g al a xy.ei net . net/gal axy/ 
Leisure-and-Recreation/ Amateur- 
Radio. html 

will take you to a multiple- 
paged list of links. Looking at the 
list reveals several books, dis- 
cussion groups, commercial or- 
ganizations, universities, ham 
clubs, and individuals. There are 
even several nonprofit organiza- 
tions and government sources in- 
cluded, All in all, this is a good 
place to get started. 

Lou Williams KE4ARM man- 
ages an Amateur Radio Web 
Server from Raleigh, North Car- 
olina. This is another example of 
a focus on the net that allows you 
to look at the Amateur Radio 
NewsLine T information on 
SAREX missions, callbook 
servers, the online repeater 
database project, and latest FCC 
rules and regs, and, of course, to 



Amateur Radio Teletype 

download some of the latest soft- 
ware. You can get to this site at 
URL: 

http://www.acs.ncsu.edu/Hain 
Radio/ 

Geoff GJ4ICD maintains his 
Ham Radio Pages, The World's 
Hotspot For Amateur Radio Infor- 
mation & News" from New Jer- 
sey. This is a huge listing of links 
for amateur radio, including just 
about every available facet of the 
hobby: the ARRL, European 
groups, antennas, and much, 
much more. As with many of 
these servers, it provides the 
"taking off point" for many other 
directions on the worldwide web. 
Take a look at Geoff's efforts at 
URL 
http ://u se u tl < n et/~ eq u i n ox/ 

As I mentioned above, there 
are several commercial interests 
addressing the needs of the radio 
amateur on the internet* Our old 
friend Kenwood is one of them, 
with their Kenwood Communica- 
tions Corporation Amateur Prod- 
ucts Group North America Home 
Page. No, you don't have to type 
alt that in, just the URL: 
htt p ://www.ac cessn v.com/ 
kenwood/ 

On that server you will find the 
"Kenwood Report/ 1 dealer list, 
new stuff at Kenwood, and, 
of course, links to other sites. 
This is, after all, the web! A differ- 
ent kind of site may be found at 
URL 
http ://wb 5f n d . tec h , u h .ed u/i r c/ 

This is the #Ham Radio Home 
Page, home of the ham radio ac- 
cess to the Internet Relay Chat 
(IRC) network* The IRC is as 
close to a free-form QSO as you 
are likely to find in cyberspace at 
this time, and may be one-on- 
one or roundtable in form. Ade- 
quate information is provided for 
the novice to get started but, as 



with anything, the best way to 
learn is to jump right in. 

How about practicing for the 
next licensure exam? The Ham- 
Exam site, managed by Stephen 
McClaran KK5QE at URL 
h tip ://w5ac ,ta m u .edu/h a m -e k a m 
html 

can help you by generating ran- 
dom questions from Novice, 
Technician, Genera), or Advanced 
levels. He is working on including 
figures for some questions, and 
adding the Extra level 

Not to leave out the packet 
crowd, how about The Packet 
Radio Home Page, found at URL 
hftp://dmgus.n5lyt datarace.com/ 
tap r/p ktfi o me .htm I 

Lee Ziegenhals N5LYT hosts 
this page, prepared by Howard 
Goldstein N2WX in Sebastian, 
Florida, It features packet radio 
pages, archives (a virtual library 
of packet information), and a link 
to the TAPR Home Page, the 
nidus of packet, everywhere. 

Not all of us have the latest 
callbook, but the Buckmaster 
World Wide HamCall™ Server 
can help those of us with Internet 
access find out who's who. By 
looking at: 

http://www.buck.com/cgi-bin/ 
dojiamcall 

you can access a callsign search 
engine that can look up just about 
any callsign you can give it 

The last in this month's series 
of sites Is another overseas loca- 
tion, the Amateur Radio WWW 
site of DKOTUI at Technical Uni- 
versity of Hmenau, Germany. 
There are collections of informa- 
tion on amateur radio in German 
as well as English, together with 
links to other servers, Take a look 
at URL: 

http://www.systemtecrinik.tu- 
ilmenau.de/ham.html 

Do you have a favorite site you 
think others should know about? 
Send it to me here, at RTTY 
Loop, via any of the addresses at 
the end of the column. Til try to in- 
clude at least one per month in 
future columns. While plans are 



still quite sketchy, there is even 
the possibility of a RTTY Loop 
Home Page in the works. So, as 
they say, stay tuned! 

Now, for those of you to whom 
much of this URL and http:// stuff 
is so much gibberish, a few words 
of advice. It you have a computer 
and a modem, getting onto the In- 
ternet through one of the com- 
mercial services is really very 
easy. Yes t you can save some 
money by connecting directly to 
the Net through a local Internet 
provider, but you may have to 
jump through a few hoops to ac- 
complish it On the other hand, if 
you can connect through Com- 
puServe or America Online, It rs 
about as easy as going to any 
other place on the service. 

Not on a major service? I am 
sure that most of you have seen 
or received an offer for America 
Online, if not others, to try it out 
for a bit for free. Go ahead, give it 
a try. If you have absolutely no 
idea of how to get started, drop 
me a note, with a self-addressed 
stamped envelope if by snailmail, 
and 111 send you some simple 
things to try. 

I devoted this month's column 
to online amateur services be- 
cause the demand for software 
seems to be growing. At least 
thafs how many of your letters 
and E-mails sound when inquir- 
ing about the RTTY Loop Soft- 
ware Collection. Now up to 10 
disks, it is a reasonably cheap 
and easy way to acquire a wide 
variety of radioteletype, packet, 
SSTY CW, and other ham utility 
programs. To get the latest list- 
ing, and details on how to obtain 
the software, drop me an E-mail 
message, at 75036,2501 on 
CompuServe, at MarcWASAJR 
on Delphi or America Online, or 
at MarcWA3AJR@aol.com via In- 
ternet. Of course, a piece of 
USPS Snailmail sent to the ad- 
dress at the top of this column al- 
so works, if you enclose a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope for 
the reply. 



C. W. WOLFE COMMUNICATIONS 




L 



BUY SELL TRADE 

All Brands of 2 Way Radios 
w and Equipment < 



H13 Central. Brings. MT 59102 

406-252-9220 Fax: 406-252-9617 

Cali Or vtttie fot Current ttyer 



QUICK, EASY, & COMPACT 

Flash carets 'NOVICE thru EXTRA* theory £e.v_woicJs 
underfmea. Over 4QQQ sets irt use! For beginner. OMs. 



XYLs&kkJs. 



MG'JTCC 


i11.*S 


TECKCI4H 


MJ5 


G€l*£fiAL 


it.** 


a£NM*C£H 


$ii-*S 


EJ("FIt+3 


:-t>7 


^^PO"! 


i-tJ(fl 


I » -**r^ 


si M 






Order Todsyf 



VIS STUDY CARDS 



CO 



- — - : - - 



1-800-OKK HAMS M 



CIRCLE T04 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Next Day 




QSLs 

Rainbow Assortment 



Call Todar & 
WtSkJp AevrfAjj 2nd Day 



Antennas West 
V J301 > 373-8425 



100 

200 

400 

500 

1000 
u 



$29.95 
$39,9$ 
$49J5 
$54,95 
$9935 



$24.9$ 

334.95 
$44.95 
$49.95 

$&9.95 



M4 2M4**l*pfW»»«^ 
Rot 5W»*;-S. froiw. IT fMH@ 



ASAP 
$19.95 
S29.9S 

$19.95 
$44.95 
$79.95 



CIRCLE 5 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



60 73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 




Number 1 8 on your Feedback card 



Michael Bryce W88VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
MassiliQn OH 44646 

Receiver Incremental Tuning 

As more hams take to the low 

bands, things can get a bit messy. J 
would guess thai every commercial 
rig has a RIT, or Receiver Incre- 
mental Tuning control, built tn, But 
most of the QRP rigs I've used in 
the past don't have this very useful 
feature. In fact, it took Heathkit 
three tries to finally add an R1T to 
the HW-9 QRP transceiver. 

What is RtT? 

In rts simplest form. RIT is a cir* 
curt to allow the operator to vary the 
receive frequency up or down a few 
kHz. Most RIT circuits have a fre- 
quency spread of plus/minus 1.5 
kHz. Now, its very easy to move 
the frequency of a VFO. In fact, 
most of the VFO circuits I've built in 
the past moved all by themselves! 
The trick in designing a practical 
RIT circuit is to keep the RIT from 
screwing up the VFO. 

Lets look at a few ways in which 
we can move the frequency of a 
VFO. A trick used way back when is 
to pface an inductor in series with a 
crystal. By switching in various 
amounts of inductance, you can 
change the frequency of the rig, 
There are some drawbacks to this 
method. First, you can't lower the 
operating frequency by a great 
amount. Second, the amount of in- 
ductance is fixed by the coils select- 
ed. If you need to move your re- 
ceive frequency between the select- 
ed inductors, you're out of luck. A 
variable inductor could be used, but 
then you must worry about keeping 
the tuning linear. Third, this method 
only works with crystal- con trolled 
rigs. Also, it you add too much in- 
ductance* your crystal-controlled rig 



O 9 

i 

BE 



S3 IQ QC 3 Ol 




Low Power Operation 



becomes an all-bander. 

The very same idea can be ac- 
complished by using several small 
fixed capacitors. You select the 
amount of offset by grounding a ca- 
pacitor connected to the tuned cir- 
cuit of your VFO. You end up with 
most of the problems you get when 
trying lo use inductors. The old- 
fashioned "bandspread" control 
used in the older radios is a prime 
example of this type of circuit de- 
sign. 

By far the most popular method 
to date is to use a varactor diode 
across the tuned circuits of the 
VFO. A RIT control voltage is ap- 
plied to the diode and its capaci- 
tance can then be varied. Since the 
control voltage is generated by a 
pot, there's no direct connection 
from the RIT control and the VFO. 
Also, the RFT may be turned on and 
off at will 

Now that you see how to vary the 
frequency of an VFO ever so slight- 
ly, you must aiso be able to return 
the VFO to the proper frequency 
during transmit. And this is the part 
that gets tricky! 

During key-down, you must re- 
turn-disengage the RIT Return the 
VFO to the transmit frequency. 
Mute the receiver. Switch the anten- 
na to the transmitter Key the trans- 
mitter. All of these steps must be 
done in the proper order and all 
within a few milliseconds. The steps 
are done in reverse when you're 
through sending. Add on the com- 
plexity of full break-in keying and 
whoa '—things begin to get sticky. 
To make things even more interest- 
ing, you need some way of turning 
the RIT off without affecting the fre- 
quency of the VFO. Then, there's 
the problem of finding the center of 
the RIT control. Add up all of these 
tasks, and you'll see why adding in 
a RtT is not as easy as it sounds. 

No Need to Panic! 



Figure 2. 



But take heart, you 
can design in a RIT for 
most rigs. In fact, here is 
a RIT that you can install 
in the original version of 
Dave Benson's 20 meter 
transceiver. 

The circuit is rather 
basic. A varactor diode 
is used to add capaci- 
tance to the VFO'S tuned 
circuits, A panel-mount- 
ed pot is the RIT control. 
You can place this pot 
anywhere on the rig to 
suit your liking, without 



To ■ jsrf lain 



+5 flEG 



1. 

-I— 12pF 



Rt «? 



R3 

1* 



: 



EH 
IMOQt 



001 




R5 



R7 
Ik 



invert 



■ , -*- V 



- ■:-: 



— 



1N914 



i ^ 

— 




Figure t. 



the worry of keeping leads short. 
For the best performance, a center 
detent pol would be a great idea. 
Check out Dig i- Key and Mouse r for 
suitable controls. Here's a thought: 
Ten -Tec, Kenwood, (com, and the 
others all have or have had center 
detent controls on the equipment. 
You could use a replacement part in 
your new design. All you need is a 
part number, and a good place to 
find that part number is a service 
manual. As a benefit, you can also 
order the matching knob set while 
you're at it. 

A RIT Circuit 

Take a closer look at the 
schematic of the RIT circuit. This 
circuit was designed by W6EMT 
and you should contact him if you 
need more information. Construc- 
tion is best done with a PC board, 
but point-to-point wiring will work 
just as welL There's nothing really 
critical about the circuit, Just keep 
your leads short to the parts going 
to the VFO. You should use a stable 
supply voltage to operate the RIT 
circuit, if the rig you're putting this 
into does not have a regulated VCC 
line, a 78XX series regulator will 
work. Remember, unless you plan 
on using a *ow drop-out regulator, a 
7812 will not provide a stable +12 
volts from a 12- volt power source. I 
have used a National LM2940CT- 
12 (Digi-Key part number 91928- 
ND) with good results down to 12.4 
volls input. The LM2940CT-12 
costs about $2 50 in single-lot 
quantity. Be sure to bypass the in- 
put and output of this tow drop-out 
regulator the same as you would 
with any other 78XX series regula- 
tor. 

As I mentioned, this RIT is de- 
signed to go directly into the rig de- 
signed by Dave Benson, \f you plan 
on using this basic circuit for anoth- 
er rig. check to make sure the VFO 
is operating as it should before you 
add on the RIT. Some (at least the 
ones I built) VFOs may not like the 
added capacitance and stop oscil- 
lating. 



Many times, adding on an extra 
circuit such as this will cause the 
keying of the rig to become all 
screwed up. Check for proper key- 
ing by using your scope or by hav* 
ing a close-in ham buddy listen to 
your signal. The keying should be 
clean and well shaped after you in* 
stall the RIT modification. 

Although you may never en* 
counter this problem, I've read sto- 
ries about fight hitting the diodes 
and causing their capacitance lo 
change. If you notice this, apply 
some black paint to the protect the 
diodes from the light. Or a strip or 
two of black plastic tape will work 
just as well, 

Another thought when you're 
working with add-on circuits to your 
VFO; Be sure you use some means 
of holding the parts down on the cir- 
cuit board so they won't move 
about. IVe been using hot-melt glue 
and find the results to be just great. 
It takes a bit of a time to get the 
glue off the board if you need to re- 
place defective parts, but then who 
ever said life was perfect? 



RIT Assembly 

()R1 100K resistor 

( ) R2 T R6 47K " 

[)R3 T R5 IK" 

( ) R4 10K control 

OR7.RB IK" 

()C1 12PFNPO 

( ) C2 .001 ceramic 

( ) C3 .1 " 

<>D1 1N4Q01 diode 

(}D2 1N4148' 

( j Q1 MPF1 02 transistor 

Check off the parts as you install on 
the PCB 

Check for solder bridges, shons, 
opens, etc. 

Mount the control/ PCB assembly as 

required- 

Comed + 12V as shown. 

Connect ground as indicated. 

Connect the LO cap to the VFO mam 
tune capacitor 

TEST 

Apply power to the receiver. To fond the 
RIT control center. Connect a VOM lo 
R4 pot center pin. Appfy + 12V to the 
key hne at R8. Note reading on VOM 
Remove tne +12V from the key line, 
and adjust the pol R4 to the same 
VOM reading. This is !he RJT center. 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1 995 61 



Homing in 



Number 19 on your Feedback card 



Radio Direction Finding 



JooMoellRE, KOOV 
PO Box 2508 
Fulierton. CA 9B633 

Hunts and Stunts 

Around the USA 

imagine going to a football or 
baseball stadium that doesn t 
have a scoreboard. Imagine also 
that final scores aren I published 
for weeks after the games end. It 
sounds absurd, but that's the way 
most ham radio competitions 
work. 

When you finish competing in 
a QSO party. Field Day. or a DX 
contest, you have only a vague 
idea who the leading competitors 
were and how well you did 
agamst them. You won't find 
out the winners and all the details 
until months later, when the offi- 
cial results are printed in a maga- 
zine. 

On the other hand, when you 



go hidden transmitter hunting, 
youll know exactly who you are 
up against and youll usually find 
out how well you placed before 
you go home. After a mobile 
hunt you will probably end up at 
a lively post-mortem session with 
plenty of success and failure sto- 
ries, either at the hidden transmit- 
ter location or a nearby restau- 
rant. Later there will be lots of 
chatter about past and upcoming 
hunts on the local repeater. 

Last month, I explained the ba- 
sics of this fast- growing radio 
sport, which most hams call *T- 
hunting* or loxhunting." In a nut- 
shell, it's ham radio's version of 
hide-and-seek for all ages. Partic- 
ipants track down the location of 
well-placed transmitters using 
easy-tr>make radio direction find- 
ing (RDF) equipment. This 
month. HI tell about some cre- 
ative ways that hams around the 
country are having RDF fun. 




Surprises Guaranteed 

Most T-hunts in North America 
involve miles of driving in RDF- 
equipped cars, trucks, vans, and 
even motorcycles (see Photo A). 
After the mobile portion of Ihe 
hunt, it's often necessary to "sniff 
ouf one or more concealed Ts on 
foot (see Photo B) + Besides expe- 
riencing the instant gratification of 
knowing how ihey did at the end, 
hunters like this challenging sport 
because, when they start out, 
they never know where they will 
end up and they are never sure 
what they will find there. 

If you go foxhunting at Hal- 
loween time, maybe youll track 
down a pumpkin' A couple of 
years ago r Randy Skin/in N6KHO 
and son Brandon KD6MMZ cut a 
small hole in the bottom of one 
and replaced the innards with an 
Alinco 580 transceiver. They 
placed their pumpkin-T under a 
pine tree in a park for the monthly 
T-hunt of the Amateur Radio Club 
of El Cajon, California. It might 
have been just a bit obvious 
there. What if they had left it in a 
patch with dozens of other pump- 
kins? 

Jim Bowman W7HPK, Direction 



Finding Coordinator for a RACES 
group in the Seattle area, recently 
wrote about a T-hunt he and his 
wife Betty put on: "We spotted an 
old barbed wire fence around a 
pasture next to a church in Lyn- 
nwood. On closer examination I 
discovered that it included an old t 
unused strand of electric fence 
wire. That did it! I found a spot 
where the fence wire came close 
to the ground and hid the transmit- 
ter and battery right under the 
fence in the bushes. I had made a 
temporary antenna from a 19-inch 
piece of insulated wire, which I 
wound around the electric fence 
wire to couple the signal to the 
fence. (Who worries about SWR?) 
'Some carefully arranged 
grass and flowers picked nearby 
completed the camouflage of the 
rig, Betty and I obtained permis- 
sion to conceal ourselves inside 
the church to watch the proceed- 
ings (a kind term for a pack of 
frenzied T-hunters beating the 
bushes). After about half an hour, 
we saw the first signs of them. 
One team pulled right into the 
church parking lot. drove in a cir- 
cle, and came back out. Shortly 
thereafter, they pulled in the park* 




Photo A Who says quads have to have square or diamond-shaped elements? 
Dave Hess KD6LZA has great results on meter T-hunts with a ctrcuiar-eiement 
quad, 

62 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 



Photo B. Most hidden Ts aren't alongside the road: so ^sniffing' gear is required. 
Marty Mitchell N6ZAV is weti equipped with a Shrunken Quad: Sniff- Amp. 
hand-talkie and active attenuator. The object of his search is atop the playground 
equipment 



tng lot again and stopped about 
50 feet from the hidden transmit- 
ter." 

Then the fun intensified, as 
more teams arrived and the on- 
foot portion of the hunt began. 
"The first team went in opposite 
directions up and down the fence 
line/' Jim continued. Tor awhile 
there was a confused mob wan- 
dering along the fence. The long- 
wire antenna was making sniffing 
tough. I was really whooping it up 
in my hiding place, loving every 
minute of watching the best 
teams we have working so hard 
to find a transmitter right at their 
feet, 

"This frenzy continued until 
Tom Bruhns K7ITM finally spotted 
the transmitter and raised his 
monster yagi in the universal vic- 
tory sign. It was impossible to de- 
termine any other finishing posi- 
tions because everyone was so 
close that when Tom found it 
everyone knew. This was the 
hardest I had ever seen so many 
T-hunters work, for so long, and 
so close to a transmitter without 
finding it!* 1 

Safe and Sober Hunters Only 

Over the years, I have written 
articles about hiders who put Ts 
in unlikely places such as baby 
carriages, shopping carts, ferris 
wheels, and fake fire hydrants. 
Jami Smith KK6CU tried to outdo 
them all this spring on the weekly 
Friday night hunt in the San 
Gabriel Valley near Los Angeles. 
"This is a find it quick and hurry 
to the restaurant 1 type of hunt that 
normally lasts a half hour to an 
hour, v he told me. "On the Mon- 
day before the day I was to hide, 
I wenl to my Temple City Ham 
watch meeting as a volunteer for 
the Los Angeles County Sheriff's 
Department. They needed volun- 
teers to help out at a sobriety 
checkpoint, so I raised my hand 
and they signed me up. Then I 
remembered that i had to hide 
the T that night. 

ll Now during the meeting, our 
Ham watch leader, Lola Lowe 
KE6JDW, mentioned that she 
wanted me to plan a demonstra- 
tion T-hunt lor some of the 
deputies," Jami continued. "That 
started me to thinking about com- 
bining the two I explained my 
idea to her and she checked with 
the sergeant. He is a pretty 
straight-laced guy, but he said 
that as long as my transmitter 
was safe and out of the way, it 
was okay. 

,J But when I arrived Friday 
night, the sergeant was not at the 



checkpoint and he had not talked 
to anybody who was there. I ap- 
proached one of the deputies and 
he told me I could put the T in my 
parked car, right at the check- 
point. My original plan had been 
to put it in one of the traffic cones 
in the middle of the lanes, but this 
worked out fine. Without giving 
away my location, I instructed the 
hunters to pay particular attention 
to their driving and for them to 
approach whatever they thought 
was the T — only one at a time. A 
few peopEe were hesitant to drive 
down the checkpoint street with 



Saturdays at a Red Cross Build- 
ing. Boundaries include all of 
Kent County. The hider asks one 
participant to be huntmaster, as- 
sisting at the starting point. To in- 
sure that all participants drive 
safely, each vehicle operator 
gives his or her driver's license to 
the huntmaster, who places it into 
a sealed envelope and gives it 
back to the driver. The huntmas- 
ter writes down the starting time 
and mileage on this envelope, 
too. "By doing this, we can tell at 
the end if any team has been 
pulled over by the authorities for 



"After the mobile portion of the hunt, 

it's often necessary to "sniff out' one 

or more concealed Ts on foot n 



their RDF vehicles, but we had a 
great time and everyone thought 
the idea was pretty neat/ 

In most cities and towns, rules 
for T-hunting are straightforward 
and simple. They specify the 
boundaries, hunt frequency, and 
scoring method. The winner is 
usually the team that finds the 
transmitter first or the one having 
shortest start-to-finish odometer 
mileage. In other places such as 
the Grand Rapids, Michigan area, 
foxhunt rules have interesting 
twists. 

According to Sam Nabkey 
WJ8T, hunts begin at 6:30 PM 



unsafe driving,' Sam says, "be- 
cause the seal on the envelope 
will be broken. That hasn't hap- 
pened , , . yet. 1 ' 

Grand Rapids hunters have an 
unusual scoring system, too. A 
few hours before the hunt, the 
hider covertly drives the shortest 
route from the Red Cross Build- 
ing to the hiding spot, determin- 
ing the minimum possible 
mileage and elapsed time. When 
a hider finds the T, his score is 
calculated by computing two frac- 
tions, minimum mileage divided 
by actual mileage and minimum 
driving minutes divided by actual 




Photo C. Bob Thomburg W8GJPI shows off a home-brew 1.2 GHz yagi he built 
for the 1995 West Coast VHF/UHF Conference T-hunt He made two— one for 

his rotating mast and the other for sniffing. 



minutes. Each fraction will be 
less than 1, unless a team man- 
ages to take less time to drive the 
course than the hunter did, in 
which case that fraction is de- 
clared to be 1 . Each of the two 
fractions (for mileage and time) is 
multiplied by 50 and the two 
products are added together to 
give a team's final score. The 
highest scoring team wins. This 
scoring method sounds complex, 
but each score takes only a few 
seconds with a hand calculator. 
For example, if a beginning team 
finishes with twice the minimum 
mileage and takes four times as 
long as the minimum time, its 
score will be 37.5 out of a possi- 
ble 100. 

Grand Rapids hiders like to an- 
nounce scores as the hunters 
come in. This can be demoraliz- 
ing when you're stuck without a 
good bearing and you hear the 
hider say that one of your com- 
petitors just found him and 
scored 85 points! 

Not For Weekends Only 

Is it hard to find time in your 
busy schedule for RDF? Want to 
stay fit and have fun at the same 
time? Dave Sims KC5JKN has 
the answer "Our little radio club 
here in Los Alamos. New Mexico, 
has been doing T-hunts on our 
lunch hour," he says. 'All of us 
work in the same place, we got 
our licenses in the last year or so ; 
and we all tike to bike ride. We 
work next to a residential area 
that's nice for riding. At the start, 
we give the fox about 10 minutes 
while we eat lunch. He rides out. 
usually to a cul-de-sac or dead 
end street, never much more 
than a mile from where we start. 
He sits down, eats lunch, and 
starts talking or reading a book 
into the mike. 

"The first person to get there 
wins. We do it on 2 meters and 
the hider tries not to make it too 
hard," Dan continues. "We stop 
when we have about 15 minutes 
left. When the fox is ready to go 
back r he starts giving obvious 
clues." 

KC5JKN is looking at ways to 
mount RDF equipment directly to 
his bike, because his present 
method is cumbersome. "We all 
use handi-talkies," he says. None 
of us knew how to do RDF at 
first. We read somewhere that 
you can hold the HT close to your 
body and turn in a circle to listen 
for body blockage of the signal. 
Unfortunately, you have to get off 
the bike to do that "I use the rub- 
ber duck and when I get close, I 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 63 



remove it Sometimes I use a 2- 
inch piece of wire as an antenna 
when close. Another person 
keeps the rubber duck on but 
holds it with both hands to shield 
it when close. Ifs tricky because 
a lot of times the fox will be eat- 
ing his lunch and not transmitting 
when you need a signal/' 

Indianapolis hams have found 
a way to go RDF contesting with- 
out having to ask a ham to be the 
hider. Cliff Vaught N9FHF wrote 
on CompuServe's HarnNet: "We 
have both monthly hunts and im- 
promptu hunts. The traditional 
hunts are on Sunday afternoons. 
The spur-oMhe-moment hunts 
are usually at night, often during 
the week." 

N9FHF continues, "Around 10 
PM or so, after my fellow crazies 
have put thek kids to bed and 
other chores are completed, we 
congregate on our favorite re- 
peater frequency. Our scanners 
are also going, looking for a sig- 
nal to hunt. It could be an errant 



one or just a strange-sounding 
one. It's usually 6 meters or high- 
er and most often around 2 me- 
ters or 70 cm, as that Is where 
most of have equipment ready to 
go. The signal could be ham, 
business, government, or any- 
thing else that's out there. 

"When a worthy signal Is 
found, a 'CQ Foxhunters' call 
goes out, After everyone has 
tuned It in and agrees that it is 
worth the chase, the hunt is on. 
Afterwards, we always retire to a 
restaurant to compare notes and 
discuss the evening's activities. 
This usually gets us home be- 
tween 1 and 3 AM. Most of our 
wives have become so accus- 
tomed to this that they don't wait 
up for us any more." 

First T-Hunt on 23 Centimeters 

Southern California T-hunters 
have done their sport on every 
band from 28 to 450 MHz in re- 
cent years. Knowing this, the or- 
ganizers of the 1995 West Coast 



VHF/UHF Conference in Cenitos 
decided that it was time for RDF 
on a new band. The last event of 
the Conference was a mobile 
hunt featuring several 2 meter Ts 
and one on 1.2 GHz FM. To win, 
a team had to have low mileage 
to the 23 cm band emitter and 
shortest time to all the foxes on 
146.565 MHz. Some teams DFed 
the new band with a short or long 
yagi on a rotating mast (see Pho- 
to C), However, the winning team 
of Gary Holoubek WB6GCT, Don 
Frlzielle W6HRC, and Jason 
McLaughlin KD6ICZ did it much 
more simply. All they used for mi- 
crowave hunting was Jason's 
handheld with a little five-element 
J-beam plugged into its BNC an- 
tenna connector. 

"I was sitting in the back hold- 
ing the handheld out the window, 
not expecting to hear much," Ja- 
son says. "Our strategy was that I 
would listen to 1.2 all the time 
and the guys in the front would T- 
hunt 2 meters as usual. We fig- 



ured that the 1 .2 T would be near 
one of the 2 meter Ts t so we 
would hunt 146.565 MHz and if 
the 1.2 GHz signal came up, then 
we would go find it. "As it turned 
out, there was an S-3 microwave 
signal at the starting point and I 
got excellent bearings on it the 
whole time. We ended up turning 
off the 2 meter radio and hunting 
the 1 .2 GHz signal first, because 
we decided that if we could get 
great mileage on that one, we 
could spend the rest of the hunt 
pedal-to-the-metal finding the 2 
meter Ts." 

I have lots more tales of unusual 
T-hunts from all over, but I'm out of 
room for this month. If you want 
more "battle stories" in future 
"Homing In™ columns, let me know, 
While you are at it, send details 
and photos of the hunts in your 
home town. Write to the address at 
the beginning of this article or send 
e-maii to me via Internet (Homin- 
gln@aoLcom) or CompuServe 
(75236,2165). 



When you contact our advertisers, tell them that you saw 

their ad in 73 Amateur Radio Today! 



ELECTRONIC LAB 




Hi Pro Repeater 



lor* £)frtlfi3«ie Lab.. 



Mode! 



Introducing The NEW HI PRO 
"R1" REPEATER 

HERE IS A COMPLETE LOW COST VHP REPEATER, LESS 
CONTROLLER, PRICED AT $589.00 . A 35 WATT VHP 2M 
REPEATER WITH COMPUTER CONTROLLER, VOICE 
SYNTHESIZER . AUTO PATCH , AUTO DAILERS T USER 
FUNCTIONS ETC. PRICED AT $1145.00 . THIS IS NOT A KIT 
BUT A COMPLETE REPEATER WITH A 2 YEAR 
WARRANTY. THE "R1" IS ALSO AVAILABLE IN 220 AND 
440 MHZ. CALL OR WRITE FOR A FREE CATALOG ABOUT 
ALL OF OUR PRODUCTS INCLUDING REPEATERS, 
RECEIVERS, TRANSMITTERS, POWER AMPLIFIERS, 
CONTROLLERS, COR IDENTIFIERS, ACCESSORIES, ETC. 



M AGGIORE ELECTRONIC LAB. 

600 WESTTOWN RIX, WEST CHESTER, E4 19382 

Fh 610 436-6051 Fax 610 436-626S 



64 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



IT MAY BE YOUR 
BUT ITS OUR B 

•WT51 $1,050 

• LM 354HD $1,900 

• LM470 $3,658 

Designed to UBC 1991 - 70mph 



HOBB Y, 
SINESS! 



cm or imme 
roRAm 



CA1AL0GW 




MasterCard 







TOWER CORPORATION 



7182 Rasmussen Ave, • Visalia, CA 93291 

Where engineering and quality come first! Ji 



■ ta 




TO ORDER CALL 

800-328-2393 



TECH SUPPORT 

209-651-7859 



FAX 

209-651-5157 



CIRCLE 22 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



& 



A ST RON 

CORPORATION 



9 Autry 

Irvine, CA 92718 

(714) 458-7277 • FAX (714) 458-0826 



T 




MODEL VS-50M 



SLSE 



ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

RUGGED * RELIABLE 



• HEAVY DUTY * HIGH QUALITY 
SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRONICALLY REGULATED 

• FOLD-BACK CURRENT LIMITING Protects Power Supply 
from excessive current & continuous shorted output 

• CROWBAR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION on all Models 
eacepl BS 3A. HS4A, RS^5A, HS4L RS-5L 

• MAINTAIN REGULATION & LOW RIPPLE at low line input 
Voltage 

• HEAVY DUTY HEAT SINK • CHASSIS MOUNT FUSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CORD except for RS-3A 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY * MADE IN U,SA 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105-125 VAC 

« OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 138 VOC t 0.05 vote 
(Internally Adjustable: 11-15 VOC) 

• RIPPLE Less than 5m v peak to peak (full load & 
low line) 

• Alt units available in 220 VAC input voltage 
(except tor SL-11A) 




LOW PROFILE POWER SUPPLY 



MODEL 

SL-I1A 
SL-11R 

SL-11S 
SL-ttf^RA 



Colors 
Gray Black 



Continuous 
Duly (Amps) 

7 
7 
7 
7 



ICS* 
(Amps) 

11 

11 
11 
11 



Size |IN) 

H * W-0 

2%*7%*9* 
2**7 «9% 
2**7**9* 
4**7 *9* 



Shipping 



WL 



12 
12 

12 
13 



RS-L SERIES 




POWER SUPPLIES WITH BUILT IN CIGARETTE LIGHTER RECEPTACLE 

Continuous ICS* Sizs (IN) 

MODEL Duty (Amps) (Amps) H * W * D 

RS-4L 3 4 3%*6WA 

HS-5L 4 5 3% * m * Tk 



Shipping 
"i. (lbs] 



Wt 



6 
7 



RM SERIES 




19" RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 

Continuous 
MODEL Duty (Amps) 



MODEL RM-35M 



RM-12A 

RM-35A 

RM-50A 

RM-60A 

Separate Volt and Amp Meters 

RM-12M 

RM-35M 

RM-5QM 

RM-6QM 



9 
25 

37 
50 

9 

25 
37 
50 



ICS* 

lAmpsI 

12 
35 
50 
55 

12 
35 
50 
55 



Size (IN) 

HxWxD 

5%x19x8V« 

5V*x 19x12% 

5Vi x 19 x 12% 

7 x 19 x 12V; 

5 1 A x 19 x 8% 

5^x19x12% 

5"* x 19x12% 

7x19x12% 



RIB 

16 
38 
50 
GO 

16 
38 
50 
60 



RS-A SERIES 




MODEL RS-7A 



MODEL 

RS-3A 

RS-4A 

HS-5A 

RS-7A 

RS-7B 

RS^IOA 

RS-12A 

RS-12B 

RS-2DA 

RS-35A 

RS^SOA 
RS-70A 



Colors 
Gray Black 






* 
t 

* 



■ 



CtitillfIS 

Oily fAnptj 

3 

4 
5 

5 

7.5 

9 

9 

IS 

25 

37 

57 



ICS" 
|Aapt| 

3 
A 

5 

7 

7 

10 

12 

12 

20 

35 

50 
70 



Sizi |fl] 

HxWxD 

3 X 4*4 x 5 J 4 

3*** xfi^xg 

3% X 6% X 7% 
3 2 /* x 6% x 9 
4 xmx 10H 

4 X TVs, x iVfr 
m x 8 x 9 

4 x Vk x 10^ 
5 x 9 x 10% 
5X 11 x11 

6 X 13* X 11 

6 x 13% * 12'i 



Slippiig 
Wt. [111.} 

4 

5 

7 

9 

10 

11 

13 

13 

18 

27 

45 
48 



RS M SERIES 




MODEL RS-35M 



MODEL 

SwitcrtaWe volt and Amp meter 
HS-12M 

Separate volt and Amp meters 

RS-20M 

RS-35N 

RS-50M 
RS-70M 



Coilinios 

Oily {Asps) 

9 
16 



37 

57 



ICS' 
lA»ps| 

12 

20 

35 

50 
70 



SiZI |IN] 
H x W x D 

4% x 8 x 9 

5 x9 x 10% 

Sx 11 x11 

6X13% x 11 

6 x 13V* x 12-4 



Skippji) 
WL (III. | 

13 

13 

27 

46 
4fl 



VS-M AND VRM-M SEHIES 




Separate Volt and Amp Meters ■ Output Voltage adjustable from 2-15 volts • Current limit adjustable from L5 amps 
to Full Load 

MODEL 

VS-12M 
VS-20M 
VS-35M 
VS-5DM 



ContifiHois 

Duty [Amps| 

©13.8VDC ©10VDC @5VDC 

9 5 2 

16 9 4 

25 15 7 

37 22 10 



ICS* 

(Amps! 
©13.8V 

12 

20 

35 

50 



Sizi|IN] 
H x W x D 

4Vz X 8 x 9 

5 X 9 X 10% 

5 x 11 x 11 

6x13^x11 



Shipping 
Wt. (lbs.) 

13 

20 
29 
46 



MODEL VS-35M 



Variable rack mount power supplies 
VRM-35M 25 15 

VRM-50M 37 22 



7 

10 



50 



5^x19x12% 
5% x 19 x 12% 



38 
50 



RS-S SERIES 




MODEL RS-12S 



Built in speaker 

MODEl 

RS-7S 

RS^IOS 

RS-12S 

RS-2QS 

SL-11S 



Gray Black 



tHtlllHS 
lltf [kmf l) 

5 

7.5 
9 

16 
7 



ICS" 
Anpi 

7 
10 
12 
20 

1f 



SiZlflN] 

H x W x I 

4 x 7% X 10% 

4 x 7% X 10ft 

4% X 8 X 9 
5 x9 X 10% 

2 J A x 1\ x m 



thippiii 

Wt. flls.| 
10 
12 
13 
18 

12 



ICS— Intermittent Communication Service (50% Duty Cycle 5m in. on 5 m in. oft) 



CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 20 on your Feedback card 



m m roumoer zu on your heeo 

Hams with class 



Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors Inc. 

P.O. Box 131646 

Staten Island NY 10313-0006 



Mars Base Simulation 

One of the best ways for 
teachers and instructors to get 
new ideas is to share with each 
other. That certainly is a primary 
goal of this column. One of my 
ham radio acquaintances who is 
a super creative teacher is con- 
tinuously coming up with innova- 
tive teaching projects. Dave 
Reeves KF6PJ is a teacher at 
Ghaminade College Preparatory 
School. We met several years 
ago at a NASA Educators' Con- 
ference at the Kennedy Space 
Center. Since then we've kept in 
touch and shared some great 
teaching experiences. 



Mars Base Omega 

On June 2 and 3 P Dave and 
fellow teacher Margery 
Weitkamp KA60CL led the hon- 
ors topics class at their school in 
West Hills, California, in a 36- 
hour Mars Base simulation. 
Dave tells me that everyone 
connected with the project had a 
great deal of fun. Pll share what 
Dave wrote me about this excit- 
ing learning experience that he 
and Margery helped orchestrate. 

The two classes moved the 
science experiments that they 
had been preparing for the en- 
tire school year from Margery's 
biology classroom, "Lunar Base 
Alpha," into newly constructed 
"Mars Base Omega/' Heather 
KE6RRD and her module group 
designed and built the Mars 
base by covering a frame of 4- 
inch PVC pipe with sheets of 
translucent plastic. For 36 




Photo A. Mike Spasoff KE6QNM and Dan Radovich KE6SOO transmit GPS data 
from the Mars Rover 



hours, base leaders Mike 
KE6QNT, Steve KE6QMU, Kris- 
ten KE6UJH, and Jon KD6FOZ 
guided teams of three or four 
classmates. The teams worked 
in 2-hour shifts, reporting results 
from Mars Base Omega to the 
command post in Dave's 
physics classroom, "Lunar Base 
Charlie." 

Students sent reports on sci- 
entific experiments, base tem- 
perature, solar electricity battery 
voltages, and crew tempera- 
tures and respiration rates, They 
typed and sent packet radio re- 
ports every half hour on their 
"Data Link." They kept continu- 
ous 2 meter radio voice commu- 
nications while they watched 
one another on closed circuit 
TV. For two days and a night, 
the 2 meter ham radio band was 
ablaze with the chatter of the 39 
teenage amateur radio opera- 
tors exchanging information 
such as "Phoebe (one of the 
base chickens) just laid her first 

egg" 

Mars Rover 

John KE6UJM T Jacob 
KE6UND, and Mike KE6UJJ 
completely renovated an old golf 
cart in the ground's mainte- 
nance shed, transforming it into 
the proud p( Mars Rover/' And 
rove it did! During the entire sim- 
ulation, the Rover Group auto- 
matically transmitted their GPS 
position to the command post in 
Base Charlie. They maintained 
2 meter voice contact, A com- 
puter in Base Charlie Used 
APRS software to display their 
changing location. Satellite 
ground station transmitted a pic- 
ture of the Rover to Pacsat dur- 
ing the event. 

Sateflite Ground Station 
WA6BYE 

Greg KE6PND and Rob 
KE6PNF ran a unique special 
events station by contacting the 
Pacsat Satellite on every pass 
over the 36-hour period, They 
enjoyed several exchanges with 
Jan ZS6BMM T who reviewed 
their Mars Rover picture in Pre- 
toria, South Africa. 

Mars Expedition 

On March 27, 1995, the hon- 
ors topics classes rehearsed the 
Base simulation by taking their 
Rover to the Santa Susana 
mountains overlooking the his- 
toric Rocketdyne Field Laborato- 
ry. Teams explored the "Mars 
environment/' locating plant, an- 



imal and rock specimens. They 
reported their findings to the 
command post over 2 meter 
voice radio. The Rover transmit- 
ted its position from its GPS re- 
ceiver to the command post on 
2 meter packet radio using soft- 
ware created by their advisor h 
Mike Tweedy KA6SPT 

Lunar Base Alpha — Margery 
Weitkamp KA60CL, Teacher 

The plant group, ted by Luigi 
KE6QVU, designed a hydropon- 
ics system and grew genetically 
engineered "Brassica rapa" 
plants. They gave the plants to 
Eric KE6QVS, the biotechnology 
group leaden who extracted the 
genetic material and used elec- 
trophoresis to characterize the 
different strains of DMA. Biotech 
team members Caryn KE6THF, 
Pratima KE6QVV T and Travis 
measured the fertilization rates 
for sea urchins in different salini- 
ty, and obtained classic results. 

Jennifer KE6TZD and Aman- 
da KE6UNB used four chickens 
to measure the egg production, 
density, and shell thickness as a 
function of various day/night 
proportions. Kyle KE6TTZ, 
Danielle KE6QVR, and Curtis 
did an exhaustive study of cray- 
fish. They took plaster casts of 
their boroughs in several simu- 
lated Mars soil types. 

The Celestial Navigation 
Team used a computer program 
to simulate the trip from lunar or- 
bit to Mars. Chuck KE6TGZ, and 
Rachel KE6UQN enacted a sim- 
ulation of the trip to Mars over 
the 2 meter com link. 

Lunar Base Charlie — Dave 
Reeves KF6PJ, Teacher 

The GPS group, Mike 
KE6QNM t and James KE6QNL, 
mounted an Eagle GPS receiv- 
er, a Tiny-2 TNC, and an HT 
transceiver on the Mars Rover. 
They tracked the Rover's posi- 
tion on a computer in Lunar 
Base Charlie using APRS soft- 
ware. Richard KE6RRF, Vanes- 
sa KE6RVL, and Kevin estab- 
lished the "Data Link" using 
packet radio. They operated 
from a laptop computer and an 
HT transceiver in Base Omega. 

Mike KE6QNT and Steve 
KE6QNU did extensive work on 
a fiber optics data link. It was 
not, however, fully operational at 
the time of the simulation. 

The public relations group 
published the articles submitted 
by each group in a 16-page 
booklet called, "Mission 2 Mars." 



66 73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 



Editors Mike, Mark, and Brian al- 
so produced a video containing 
Patrick KESQNP's animation of 
the Rover, the Base, and the 
Martian terrain. They obtained 
most of their images from the 
WWW on the Internet. 

During the Mars Base simula- 
tion, Nilou KE6QVT prepared an 
excellent weather report from one 
of the NOAA weather pictures 
that she acquired directly from 
the satellite. The occupants of the 
Mars Base were grateful for the 
cool and cloudy June gloom. 

The Power Systems Group, 
Amy KE6RVN, Sean, and Fer- 
nando set up the solar power 
electrical system used to power 
radios, computers, and lights in 
the Mars Base during the simula- 
tion. 

Jon KD6FOZ and Brian 
KE6QWE established the corn 
Link between Command Base 
Charlie and Mars Base Omega. 
They used 2 meter radios for 
voice and closed circuit video for 
the television signals between the 
two bases. 



In Summary 

According to Dave, the stu- 
dents mastered the science and 
the technology skills needed to 
operate both Mars Base and the 
Rover. The students were re- 
sponsible for all aspects of 
designing and setting up the 
base, and for its subsequent op- 
eration. As teachers, Dave and 
Margery were excited about how 
well the young people exercised 
leadership during the mission. 
They were also pleased with 
how the students were able to 
train one another in the opera- 
tion of the experiments and the 
packet radio system. For their 
part, the students were surprised 
that even while they were learn- 
ing, they were having a good 
time. 

For more details about the 
Mars Base Simulation project, 
contact Dave Reeves KF6PJ at 
Chamfnade College Preparatory 
School, 7500 Chaminade Av- 
enue, West Hilts, California 
91304. 




Photo B. The command post in the field on March 27. 




Photo C> David Reeves kfbpj and Greg Flowers KE6PND speaking about ham 
radio for the bases. 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 




TVC-4G 
Made in USA <>n\y $89 

SEE THE SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO 

Many ATV repeaters and individuals are retransmitting 
Space Shuttle Video & Audio from their TVRO's tuned to 
Spacenet 2 transponder 9 or weather radar during signifi- 
cant storms, as well as home camcorder video. If it's being 
done in your area on 420 - check page 538 in the 95-96 
ARRL Repeater Directory or call us, ATV repeaters are 
springing up all over - all you need is one of the TVC-4G 
ATV 420-450 MHz do wnco riveters, add any TV set to ch 2, 
3 or 4 and a 70 CM antenna (you can use your 435 Oscar 
antenna). We also have ATV downconverters, antennas, 
transmitters and amplifiers for the 400, 900 and 1200 MHz 
bands, In fact we are your one stop for all your ATV needs 
and info. We ship most items within 24 hours after you call 
Hams, call for our complete 10 page ATV catalogue. 



(818) 447-4565 M-Th 8am-5:30pm 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 

2522 Paxson Ln f Arcadia CA 91007 



Visa, MC, UPS COD 

Tom (W0ORG) 
Maryarm (WB6YSS) 



Scan Manager 1.0 Pro ^(ffifiSf^ 



Windows-Based HF Scanning, Logging, 
SWL, and Radio Control Software 




Scan Manager 1,0 Pro 



SWL Manager 2.0 



Scan Managef J .0 Pro is a High-Perform ance Windows-Based program designed prurnanly foi the Amateur 
Radio & SWL Enthusiast Scan Manager 1 D Pro Seamlessly inJeg rates the MEW version of SWl Manager 
for tmely Powerful HF rtioriilijiino,' Scan Manager 1 Pro's Scan Category Concept is basL»d upon the 
Cfa serf (Cation ot Services allocated by t!le ITU These Ciassihcabons (rerered toas Scan Categories in Scar 
Manager) are broken down «ntn the following: categories. Aeronautical. Amateur. Broadcasting (SWL). 
Maritime, Standard Frequency & Time Signals, and F«ed Services In addition, Scan Manager 1 OPro 
includes tine AM Broadcast Banc, the Lt.S Citizens Band, Wt AW Schedule {from the ARRL}. ftfiscellaneous 
(Custom Scanning) and. of course, the User Database Scan Category (Create Custom Scan Gategor ies). 
The Scan Categories are preprogrammed wilt' the appropriate HF nand assignments whi-cn males scanning 
by Classification, or Category Extremely Easy? 



Scan Manager 1.0 Pro FeStUfeS SWL Manager 2.0 



Intuitive Colo* Display Screens with 3-D Graphics 
One Ctch on Tab Selects Scan Category 
Tool Bar with TooFTfp Captions for ease of use 
Colorful Graphics for Tabbed Scan Categories 
Customize User D6 Tab with Radio Bitmap (Popular 

Radio Bitmaps Included) 
Compatible with Alt Kenwood lcom j and Vaosu 

Radio* {except FT-787) 
Use Comm Ports 1 -4 
Local & GMT Tune Displayed on Screen 
Quickly Launch you: Favorite TNCTTerminat Prgrn 
Impuf! Text Ftles Directly irvEo the User Database 
Display Editable Spreadsheet type Views of e4her 

the SWL or User Database 
Print Professional! Quality Reports from the 

Database 
One Click Logging of Scan Frequency Id Database 
Help Assistant Provides Quick Access to htetp Info 
Control Scan F'jndxnns wrtn Mouse or Key board 
One Clsck Displays SWL Manager's Screen 



• Includes Editable SWL Database with Hundreds 

of BroadcasTS from Dozens of Countnes 
■ Powerful Search Capabtlrtes, teNs you 'which 

Countries are Broadcasting RIGHT NOW ' 

• Displays Country Flag & Loacauon of Broadcast 
Station Headquarters on World Map (Flag Bitmaps 

Inducted) 
•Displays Locals CMT T'lmeon Screen 

• Simple to use with On-Line Help (Help Assistant) 
•Display Editable Spreadsheet Viewof SWL 

Database & Print Two Stytes of Database Reports 

• Control Scan Functions wth Mouse or Keyboard 
•Fully Integrated wrth Scan Manager 1 .0 Pro 

• One Click Displays Scan Manager's Screen 



CreditCard Orders: 



[(MU, Vsa.. Amex, or 
Disc} Call PsL, at 900-242-4775 A$k for Product 
#14077. Scan Manager i,o Pro (3Q(j # V orse-s 
ONLY Use address below *pr ALL Other info ] 



• Plus S&H: $5 U.S. 
$G Canada, %B Overseas 



Includes Both 
Programs Integrated 



Call or Write for FREE 
COLOR Info Kit I 



KC4ZGL HAM Software 

154S Cedar Bluff Trail 
Marietta, GA 30OS2 USA 
(770)421-0345 
internet; tonycontrada^jatjwin.cofn 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 67 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



raumoer zi on your he 

Above & beyond 

VHF and Above Operation 



C. L Houghton WB61GP 
San Diego Microwave Group 
6345 Badger Lake Avb, 
San Diego CA 92119 

Surplus Ideas for GOES 
1691 MHz Converter 

Well I had to do something on 
this topic sooner or later. I have 
had so many requests and letters 
all commenting how on a limited 
budget a GOES Weather Satellite 
receive converter can be con- 
structed. Usually the converter in 
question takes the form of a 
downconverter to 137 MHz. 
where the VHF receiver and ex- 
isting system is used for VHF 
WEFAX. By using existing hard- 



ware at 137 MHz for WEFAX. this 
project necessitates the construc- 
tion only of an RF amplifier, mix- 
er, and local oscillator. The trick 
is, of course, to keep the project 
low in terms of cost to remain 
within budget. 

System parameters dictate that 
the system should have a noise 
figure of 2 dB or less and gain of 
about 15 to 20 dB minimum in the 
RF preamplifier. More gain and a 
reduced noise figure would be 
nice, as this would allow a margin 
of extra performance to allow for 
Si gnal variation , 

Mow, the hardest part is trying 
to put together a system on a 
shoestring budget That's always 
the hard request lo fifl t but we will 




Photo A Both the modified and original LNB. 




Photo B. Original LNB for 3. 7 to 4.2 GHz TVRO operation. 



give It a try and tackle that prob- 
lem head-on. What i have to offer 
is not a complete PC board lay- 
out for construction but rather a 
set of conversion ideas that in 
part will allow you to construct a 
good portion of a 1691 MHz re- 
ceiving downconverter from sur- 
plus material that should be avail- 
able in your local area. After all. if 
you cant find the surplus materi- 
al you can't construct this low- 
cost converter, Lels take the 
problems of our surplus material 
one-by-one starting, with the RF 
preamplifier. 

The biggest problem in any 
high -sensitivity downconverter is. 
of course, the receiving RF 
preamplifier that must have lots 
of gain and a good, or Vow, noise 
figure- Given that, other compo- 
nents required include a mixer 
and possibly an IF preamplifier in 
addition to Ihe all-important local 
oscillator We will handle the local 
oscillator problem last as this will 
be a problem to solve in next 
month's column. This month. I 
want to present ideas that can be 
put into motion so that we can 
fake the finished form next 
month I like to work with dead- 
lines as they tend to make cre- 
ative ideas sprout faster rather 
than waiting for something to 
happen, I call this sort of a cre- 
ation research crash program. 
Now, back to surplus-material 
renovation. 

What, then, is available in 
common surplus material that 
can deliver the basic design con- 
siderations and fill the bill? Well, 
what's more natural than to use 
the very surplus old standby 
TVRO 3,7 to 42 GHz Low Noise 
Amplifier (LNA) f Prior use of sur- 
plus LNAs at other than TVRO 
frequencies have proved suc- 
cessful in a general-use amplifier. 
Putting this same LNA back to 
service in the 1691 MHz frequen- 
cy range is not a problem. The 
basic converted amplifier showed 
good usable gain from 800 to 
slightly over 4 GHz when modi- 
fied. Be aware that the gain is not 
uniform across the frequency re- 
sponses whan the bandwidth is 
opened up to cover 800 MHz to 4 
GHz, Variation is great but con- 
sider that the original gain was 
some +40 dB in the 3,7 to 4.2 
GHz range. 

The conversion is quite simple, 
since all that is required is to re- 
move the frequency determining 
stripline components between 
amplifier stages. By removing Ihe 
frequency-determining trim stubs. 



the amplifier will be changed from 
a relatively narrow band unit to 
one of wide bandwidth. The fin- 
ished stripline will look like the 
devices are all interconnected by 
just a 50-ohm or so stripline with 
no frequency-peaking stubs. If 
you are a real perfectionist, you 
could even try your hand at im- 
proving gain at the 1691 MHz fre- 
quency if of interest (snowflake 
tuning). I haven't tried this but 
suspect that you can obtain some 
success with this improvement. 

A normal (stock LNA) amplifier 
provides about 40-50 dB of gain 
in the 3,7 to 4.2 GHz TVRO 
band, Now there is usually lots of 
excess gain to play with making 
broadbanding quite practical. The 
type of LNA you happen on to tor 
this conversion is not important 
as long as the cost is low; usually 
surplus LNAs can be had for 
about $4 to $6 each. As I said be* 
fore, a surplus LNA has about 
40-50 dB gain and, even after 
conversion, these typical ampli* 
fiers still provide at least 30 dB of 
usable gain. Of course, there are 
peaks and valleys in this wide 
bandwidth mode but, with a little 
retuning effort, I am sure thai you 
will have good results making the 
preamp work at 1691 MHz. 

The rest of the conversion re- 
quires a mixer and for embellish- 
ments an IF preamp, if you de- 
sire. Now with this in mind you 
might be able to pick up a varia- 
tion of the LNA— namely, the 
LNB. This is a unit that not only 
incorporates an RF preamplifier 
but a mixer and usually an IF 
preamplifier. If you can find one 
of these LNBs, it would save a 
few dollars on conversion and 
provide more gain as the IF am* 
plifier can be brought into play. 

The conversion scheme with 
an LNB is a iittle more complex 
because the unit has an internal 
local oscillator, usually a Dielec- 
tric Resonant Oscillator (DRO), 
Unfortunately this oscillator can- 
not be modified to work for our 
conversion and needs to be re- 
moved, as intact as possible, for 
some future project, With the 
DRO removed in most modules, 
there is space available to place 
a small voltage-controlled oscilla- 
tor. In the unit that I converted, I 
just removed the entire metal 
wave guide flange to eliminate 
bulk not required in our converter. 
I mounted a coaxial connector to 
conned an external LO of choice. 
More on the local oscillator Later 

Removing the DRO leaves the 
basic RF preamplifier for conver- 



se 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



sion using the same procedure 
as in a stock LNA. The IF preamp 
that comes with an LNB needs 
attention^ as it operates in the 
1,000-MHz range and is frequen- 
cy restrictive due to its low* value 
frequency coupling capacitors. To 
lower the frequency response to 
the 137-MHz range, all that is re- 
quired is to increase the inter- 
stage coupling capacitor's value, 
thereby lowering the frequency of 
operation. For an IF of 1.000 
MHz or so t the value should be 
very small — say. a few pF — but 
with an IF in the 137-MHz range, 
a value near 10 times the original 
is normal This one conversion 
wilt improve the low-frequency 
coupling and lower the operating 
frequency of the IF preamp. 

Modifying the LNA or LNB 
housing to remove the waveguide 
flange is best done with a good 
bandsaw to eliminate most of the 
LNA's case. A hand hacksaw 
could be used, but the effort re- 
quired is almost superhuman; I 
know, because I tried my hand at 
one on a hot California day You 
can remove quite a bit of metal- 
as is evident in Photo A, which 
shows both a stock and convert- 
ed LNB, As you can see, the pro- 
file of the converted unit is quite 
smalL Before you are ready to 
take a whack at the metal, make 
sure the PC board will survive; ei- 
ther remove it or take a chance 
and leave it in place, {That's if 
you have several units available 
to check out G-force survival on 
your band saw "shake" table.) I 
removed the complete PC board 
assembly and left the minimum 
amount of material connected be- 
fore sawing, using good static- 
free procedures to afford FET-de- 
vice protection. 

When you remove the PC 
board- make a sketch of the inter- 
connecting leads and be sure to 
include details showing how the 
leads were attached and the 
wires dressed. A simple sketch 
will |og the memory, as most will 
fall into place. But do not leave rt 
up to chance; make the drawing 
or sketch showing where every* 
thing attaches. 

After the waveguide section is 
removed from the LNA housing, 
drill and tap holes for the coaxial 
connections to be used lor the 
amplifier input Drill a new hole m 
a location near the output RF 
connector: this is where we 
will install a new DC power 
feedthrough capacitor. After all 
drilling operations and cleanup 
are complete, remount the origi- 



nal PC board to the metal assem- 
ble, using grounded static-free 
procedures. This will insure thai 
you will not subject the PC board 
and its sensitive FETs to destruc- 
tive static charges. 

Before attaching the input 
coaxial connector, cut the input 
trace and add a 10-pF chip ca- 



tal'ControlJed circuitry going in the 
500 or so MHz ranges. One of 
these types was developed for lo- 
cal oscillator injection use with 
the no-tune type of transceivers. 
This design was originally pub- 
lished in QST magazine. A varia- 
tion of this circuitry is from the 
English publication, RSGB. An- 



"l/i trying to give this project a fair 

shake, / must mention a few others and 

tet you choose what is the easiest for 

you to obtain or construct " 



pacitor between the coaxial con- 
nector and the base of the first 
device. Mount the capacitor near- 
est to the coaxial connector, leav- 
ing as much of the input stripline 
lead as possible going to the in- 
put FET 

Next* connect the DC power 
lead to the feedthrough capacitor. 
It should be mounted near the 
output coaxial connector on the 
amplifier, if practical. The original 
LNA used a power feed option 
that provided DC power up the 
coax feedline. It is better to sepa- 
rate this line into separate DC 
power and RF output. Remove 
the connection for the DC power 
to the regulator input on the PC 
board from the coaxial connector. 
It's usually a small wire-wound 
RFC that connects to the output 
connector. Remove this lead and 
attach to the feedthrough. This 
operation is the same for both the 
LNA and the LNB. 

If you are modifying an LNA. a 
separate mixer will be used. 
There are several choices for a 
suitable mixer, you could build 
one or purchase an excellent 
mixer for less than $20. The most 
reasonably priced mixer that I 
have come across is the 5RA-11 T 
which is good to 2,000 MHz and 
works well at 1691 MHz. It's a 
very small mixer about the size of 
a 14-pin IC, This mixer is starting 
to show up in modest quantities 
from surplus and that should hold 
down costs even further for con- 
struction of this converter. Cou- 
pling this external mixer and a 
small IF amplifier — for instance, 
an MMIC amp — completes the 
basic RF to IF circuitry, with the 
exception of the local oscillator. 

Local Oscillator Circuit Ideas 

Construction of a local oscilla- 
tor is a task that can take many 
twists. There are several different 
PC boards available to get crys- 



other variation would be to con- 
struct a VCO and synthesizer us- 
ing the old favorite MC- 1451 06 
Motorola synthesizer chip with an 
appropriate frequency divider. All 
circuits require a frequency multi- 
plier either to double or to triple 
the frequency of operation. The 
VCO model could be made to op- 
erate on the frequency needed 
for LO injection, but requires fre- 
quency dividers to allow the low- 



frequency synthesizer chip to be 
used. Of course, there are other 
circuits that can be used. These 
are just some starting ideas. 

In trying to give this project a 
fair shake, I must mention a few 
others and let you choose what is 
the easiest for you to obtain or 
construct, A suitable local oscilla- 
tor can be obtained from a 10- 
GHz "Brick"-type f phased-lock os- 
cillator, as most of the cavity- 
tuned oscillators run in the 1 .600 
to 2,000 MH2 ranges and do not 
require conversion. Even a 
*Brick" with a defective diode mul- 
tiplier can be put to use. The mul- 
tiplier section originally multiplied 
the 1.600-2,000 MHz oscillator 
frequency by 6 to 10 times, to the 
12-GHz range. For fundamental 
frequency operation of a "Brick"- 
type oscillator is not required. In 
this application, the high-power 
LO is phase locked to a crystal 
that is 1/16 or 1/17 of the high- 
power local oscillator. 

Now what can be the cheapest 
local oscillator for this applica- 
tion? Well, again, the answer can 




Photo C. Close-up of modified LNB. center connector LO, right connector RF in- 
put, left IF output 




Photo D. Bnck-type oscillator from Frequency West Upper harmonic multiplier 
removed showing hofe to which to connect pwbe for fundamental output. Note is 
fust above 1W" in aiamr notation on upper fiat surface. 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1 995 69 



be found In the television market- 
place in an unlikely component: a 
simple television tuner converter 
module, These tuners have a 
voltage-tuned oscillator that cov- 
ers 500 MHz to over 1 GHz. They 
can be used with minimaJ circuitry 
to obtain the required injection 
frequency. Am I still on the kick of 
using a Motorola synthesizer chip 
(MC-1 45106)? You bet; it fills the 
bill well. The only problem with 
this circuit is that it provides 1/2 
or 1/3 of the required local oscil- 
lator frequency. That necessitates 
the construction of a multiplier 
stage to double or triple the 
phase-locked synthesizer fre- 
quency. It should not be too tough 
to construct whatever type of os- 
cillator you choose. Next month, 
some circuit ideas on the material 
we covered verbally. Be on the 
lookout for LNAs and LNBs for 
this conversion, which will contin- 
ue next montft. 

Microwave Update 1995 

The North Texas Microwave 



Society will hold the annual Mi- 
crowave Update Convention in 
Arlington Texas on October 26, 
27 , 28, and 29, at the La Qutnta 
Hotel. Reservations can be made 
by calling (800) 453-7909. The 
La Quinta is at S25 N. Watson 
Rd., Arlington, Texas 76011 . 

The technical program for Mi- 
crowave Update 95 is nearly 
completed. The program consists 
of many well-known technical mi- 



will be hefd Friday evening along 
with the flea market. Test equip- 
ment demonstrations are 
planned by Hewlett Packard and 
Tektronix, We plan to have a net- 
work analyzer available for tun- 
ing filters, etc. Bring your LOs. 

Kent WA5VJB will help out 
with the customary equipment 
auction, which is always helpful 
in offsetting conference expens- 
es. Prize drawings will be held in 



"We are always looking 

for conference papers 

even if you do not wish to 

present them at a 

formal session. " 



crowave enthusiasts from across 
the nation, and even Japan and 
England, There will be a wide 
range of topics that cover 902 
MHz to 24 GHz + The customary 
noise-figure-measuring workshop 



between the technical papers, 

and again all donations are very 
much appreciated. Please con- 
tact WB5LUA If you have any- 
thing to offer. 
As in past years the ARRL has 



again offered to publish the pro- 
ceedings, and all information on 
the world above 902 MHz is very 
much appreciated. We are al- 
ways looking for conference pa- 
pers even if you do not wish to 
present them at a formal session. 
The articles can be any length, 
even one page. It is preferred 
that the papers be camera ready, 
and therefore best printed on a 
laser jet printer. The ARRL 
prefers 1-inch margins at the bot- 
tom and 3/4-inch margins on the 
other three sides. Photographs 
should be labeled but not at- 
tached to paper. 

Conference pre-registration 
costs $40 and is due by October 
2, Regular registration fee at the 
door and after October 2 is $45. 
Contact Al Ward WB5LUA, 2306 
Forest Grove Estates Rd., Allen, 
Texas 75002, for information 
about this great convention, 
which centers on microwave ac- 
tivity and the dissemination of the 
latest information to the amateur 
community. 



To subscribe to 73 Amateur Radio Today dial 1 (800) 274-7373* Don't miss a single issue! 



REPEATER CONTROLLER 
With AUTOPATCH $139,95 




D1MF Controlled Autopatcli and 4 control outputs. Switch 
selectable CWID VOX or COR receiver control. Assembled 
tested board. LED* for Power, TX, RX, Phone. Intel 8748 
microcontroller. Board size 3.8 x 63 inches. You add receiver, 
transmitter* power supply (12v), phone line, and antenna 
system. Circuit board is top quality, double sided, plated 
through holes, solder mask on both sides and parts legend. 
Shipping S4 for UPS GROUND or S6 for UPS BLUE, COD 
add $4. For more information call or write to: 

John Bell (702) 267-2704 

1381 Saratoga St. Minden, NV 89423 




G5RV ANTENNAS 

G5RV-MB DELUXE 

80 THRU 10 METERS. 102' 

LONG WITH XFMR & 70' 

RG-8X CABLE $49.95 PPD. 



80 THRU 10 METERS, 102' 

LONG, NO XFMR OR 
CABLE ONLY $28.95 PPD. 



G5RV-JR 

40 THRU 10 METERS, 52' 
LONG, NO XFMR OR 

CABLE 
ONLY $24.95 PPD. 



COAX CABLE 

RG-213/U 95% BRAID 
COVERAGE WITH NON- 
CONTAMINATING JACKET 
ONLY .34/FT. 

RG-8X 95% BRAID 
COVERAGE WITH NON- 
CONTAMINATING JACKET 
ONLY .15/FT. 

450 OHM LADDER-LINE 
18GA.SOUD .13/FT. 

16 GA STRANDED , 15/FT. 
300 OHM TWINLEAD .15/FT. 
72 OHM TWINLEAD .20/FT. 

#14 7/22 STRANDED HARD 
DRAWN COPPER 
ANTENNA WIRE .08/FT. 



CIRCLE Z7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



VAN GORDEN ENGINEERING 

PO Box 21305 

S.Euclid, OH 44121 

Phone 216-481-6590 

FAX 216-481-8329 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



W m Nurnl 

Ham to ham 



Number 22 on your Feedback card 



Dave Mil for NZ9E 
7462 Lawter Avenue 
Niies, fL 60714-3108 

Beginning this month, 73 Ama- 
teur Radio Today is inaugurating 
a totally new column, Ham To 
Ham, or HTH for short. We're 
looking for interesting ideas : tips : 
suggestions, simple equipment 
modifications, workshop tech- 
niques — whatever you think 
might be of interest or helpful to 
other hams, both Those who are 
just starting out and we Old 
Timers alike. 

HTH will be just that, a column 
of interesting ideas passed on 
from one ham to another. We'll 
need your help in designing both 
the actual format and the month- 
to-month contents of the column. 
Ill start if off, but whether it con- 
tinues is up to you, Send in your 
favorite ideas, the things that per- 
haps you wish someone had told 
you before you were forced to 
find out the hard way, and we'll 
include them in this column. 

To motivate and somewhat 
compensate you for your efforts, 
Uncfe Wayne's unlimited budget 
for this effort will pay you $10 for 
every tip or suggestion that's pub- 
lished. No, you won't get rich, but 
it will help to defray your postage 
and writing costs; also, youll 
have the satisfaction of knowing 
that youVe helped a fellow ham 
and youil get to see your name in 
print, a process perhaps making 
you famous, but not likely rich! 

What kind of things are we 
looking for? You be the judge. 
Basically anything that seems like 
it might be helpful to others with 
the same rig or station accessory 
that you have. It might be an op- 
erational tip 7 a nifty modification 
(one that you know actually 
works well and is duplicatable), a 
novel way of doing something, or 
a circuit that you've found to be of 
benefit around your station. 
There are many new and exciting 
rigs and accessories out there to- 
day, and we re interested in your 
experiences and in the ways you 
found to improve some of them. 

Just about any item ever de- 
signed has some bugs or incon- 
veniences built into it. What have 
you discovered to make a partic* 
ular piece of gear more "user 
friendly 1 ? Send it to me and Til try 



Your Input Welcome Here 



to include it in this column. 

Anything around the ham 
shack is fair game here: 
transceivers, amplifiers, micro- 
phones, monitoring equipment, 
antennas, computers, computer 
peripheraJs : test equipment, 
clever shop tools, or new tech- 
niques on using tools — just about 
anything in the way of information 
that the rest of us will also find 
helpful. Try to keep it within the 
ham radio fiefd, but even some 
ideas that may have universal ap- 
peal in our non-ham electronic 
lives will be considered. After all, 
we have to keep the XYL and 
harmonics happy, and they too 
may be potential hams in the 
rough. 

When you send in your ideas, 
try to include as much detail as 
you possibly can. The more you 
can tell a person exactly how to 
implement your idea, the better 
chance of success they'll have to 
duplicate it. If a photo would help, 
include a clear, well-exposed one 
in color or B&W along with your 
idea. If a schematic or partial 
schematic would be invaiuabfe, 
be sure to send a copy of one. If 
a mechanical drawing is called 
for, then a clearly marked, rea- 
sonably easy-to-read drawing 
would be very much appreciated 
by everyone who'll be using your 
idea. Even a sketch is better than 
nothing, if drawing isn't your 
strong suit. 

By the way, we're definitely not 
looking for unsubstantiated com- 
plaints about any particular man- 
ufacturer's product. Try to be fair 
when writing about a particular 
brand of equipment. All electronic 
devices have faults or room for 
improvement Even at that, what 
you may think is a problem some- 
one else may see as a benefit. I 
suppose that the bottom line is; 
Err on the side of understanding 
rather than on the side of unjust 
criticism. Were a whole lot better 
off today than we were in the 
days when hams had to build just 
about everything they used 
around the shack. 

So that's the basic game plan. 
Send your ideas, suggestions, 
tips, and techniques to me at: 
Ham To Ham h c/o Dave Miller, 
NZ9E, 7462 Lawler Avenue, 
Niles, IL 60714-3108 

Please include a self-ad- 




New 73 columnist David F. Miller NZ9E, in the ham shack. 



dressed, stamped return enve- 
lope if you would like to have any 
of your materials returned to you. 
Actually, Td prefer that you send 
copies that you can spare, keep- 
ing the originals for your own files 
in case of questions or if further 
information is needed. Also, send 
only your original, unpublished 
ideas. If you're sending in an idea 
that a friend or club group origi- 
nated, make sure that they have 
no objection to the idea being 
published and then use at feast 
part of the 10 bucks to buy them 
all coffee & rolls. 

So show us the direction that 
you'd like to see this column take 
by sending me your best brain- 
storms. Uncle Wayne has given 
the go-ahead to give this idea a 
try, but we all have to work at it to 
make it work for us. Think of this 
column as a kind of "clearing 
house" for tips that all of us can 
use at some point or another. Un- 
cle Wayne is providing us with 
the medium of the magazine to 
do that effectively. Above all, 
think of this as your column, a 
place where you can see your ef- 
forts in print so they'll be avail- 
able to others in the hobby. 

To show that my heart is in the 
right place, HI give you a couple 
of my own ideas to get the ball 
rolling. These are just a couple of 
samples of what we're looking for 
in HTH; I hope that you or some- 
one you know might find them 
useful. And don't be afraid to 
spread the word about HTH, The 
more ideas we have coming in, 
the more we can give back to the 
ham community. 

A Source For Small Switch or 
Jack Boxes 

Here's a tip Tve used to obtain 
a small plastic box for mounting a 
miniature toggle switch or two, or 



perhaps a couple of miniature or 
sub-miniature phone jacks, and 
so forth in a hurry. Best of all, it's 
basically freef 

If you own^or know someone 
who owns — one of those ultra- 
small pocket dictation tape 
recorders, the kind that use the 
"micro" cassette tapes, don't 
throw away the small plastic box- 
es that the blank tapes come in. 
These boxes measure about 2- 
1/4" x 1-1/2" x 1/2" and can be 
used to house the small switches 
& jacks mentioned above, plus 
many other miniature electronic 
do-dads very nicely. The boxes 
are insulated, have a built-in 
hinged fid, and are fr&& with the 
microcassette tapes. 

The box can be spruced up a 
bit with matching color of spray 
paint, if desired, and the ends are 
easily drilled and reamed to ac- 
commodate the incoming/outgo- 
ing cables plus miniature switch- 
es and jacks — along with other 
small parts such as resistors and 
capacitors— to complete whatev- 
er circuit you might be duplicat- 
ing. A strip of double-faced tape 
will hold the finished box wherev- 
er you wish, on the side of a 
piece of equipment or perhaps 
under the lip of a shelf. It can be 
tucked away in any unobtrusive 
corner on the operating tabfe, 
while providing both protection 
and easy access when needed. 

Perhaps you'd like to bring out 
a remote input or output from the 
back of your transceiver, or 
maybe mount a small switch to 
control remotely one thing or an- 
other at the location of your 
choice, to fit your operating style. 
One of these little boxes can eas- 
ily be recycled to accommodate 
the idea. 

And the XYL wonders why I 
never throw anything away! 



73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 71 





AMATEUR TELEVISION 



GET THE ATV BUG 

>1 CT Watt pep 

Transceiver 

Only $499 

Made in USA 
Value + Quality 
from over 30years 
In ATV.„WGORG 

Snow free line of sight DX is 90 miles - assuming 
14 dBd antennas at both ends. 10 Watts in this one 
box may be all you need lor local simplex or repeater 
ATV. Use any home TV camera or camcorder by 
plugging the composite video and audio into the front 
phono jacks. Add 70cm antenna, coax, 13.8 Vdc @ 
3 Amps, TV set and you're on the air - it's that easy! 

TC70-10 has adjustable RF out (1 to 10w p.e.p.) and 
sync stretcher to properly match RF Concepts 4-1 1 or Mi- 
rage D1010N-ATV amps for 100 Watts p.e.p. Specify 
439.25, 434.0, 427,25 or 426.25 MHz, 2nd xtal add $20, 
Hot GaAsfet downconverter varicap tunes whole 420-450 

MHz band to your TV ch3. 7.5x7.5x2 J* aluminum box. 
Transmitters sold only to licensed amateurs, for legal purposes, 

verified in the latest Callbook or send copy of new license. 

Hams, call for our complete 10 pg. ATV catalog 

Everything you need tor 400, 900 or 1 200 MHz ATV. 



(818) 447-4565 M-Th&nn.S:30pmpst Visa, MC, UPS COD 

P.C. ELECTRONICS TomiweoHG) 

2522 Paxson Lane Arcadia CA 91007 Mafyann {WB6YSS) 



- Packet Radio - 

Portable & Affordable! 




1,-liB. 



Model BM 
Packet Modem 
Made in U.S.A. 



* Simple Installation 
it No External Power 
it Smart Dog™ Timer 
it Perfect For Portable 
it Assembled & Tested 

• VHF,UHF, HF(lOM) 



Whether you're an experienced packeteer or a newcomer wanting to 
explore packet for the first time, this is what you've been waiting for! 
Thanks to a breakthrough in digital signal processing, we have 
developed a tiny, full-featured, packet modem at an unprecedented 
low price, The BayPac Model BP-1 transforms your PC-compatible 
computer into a powerful Packet TNC, 
capable of supporting sophisticated features 
like digipcating, file transfers, and remote 
terminal access. NOW is the time for YOU 
to join the PACKET REVOLUTION! 



J Incorporated 



400 Daily Lane 

P.O. Box 5210 

Grants Pass, OR 

97527 




1-800-8BAYPAC 




1-801^822-9722 

(503} 474-6700 




Better Visibility Tuning 
Indicators 

Both the AEA PK-232 and the 
MFJ 1278B digital multi-mode 
controllers use red LED bargraph 
tuning indicators to assist the op- 
erator with correct transceiver 
tuning when operating on the HF 
bands. These red bargraphs are 
tine in subdued lighting, but they 
tend to lL wash-ouf under direct or 
overhead lighting, making the 
"dancing bars" difficult to see. 

Fortunately, these bargraphs 
are made in convenient, 20-pin, 
plug-in, DIP packages, with 10 
pins along each long edge and 5 
LED vertical bars in each pack- 
age. I've found that green bar- 
graphs are much easier for me to 
see under high ambient lighting 
conditions, and since they are 
plug-in, it's an easy matter to 
change over to them if you've 
had the same experience. One 
source of these compatible green 
bargraphs is Digt-Key Gorp, T PO 
Box 677, Thief River Falls, MN 
56701-0677 (Tel: 1-800-344- 
4539). They list the green arrays 
as their catalog part number 
LT1067-ND and also offer yellow 
ones as part number LT1068-ND. 

Keep in mind that you'll also 
have to change the color of the 
"filter" plastic covering the rectan- 
gular cut-out in the front panel to 
match the color of the bargraph 
you've chosen. The filter material 
can simply be a small piece of 



colored plastic film available in 
many stationery or variety stores. 
The filter film isn't absolutely es- 
sential, but it does significantly 
improve the contrast ratio be- 
tween the lighted LED and the 
background color-tone. 

By the way T if when you plug-in 
the new LED array, it doesn't 
work the first time around, simply 
unplug it and rotate it 180 de- 
grees. If you install it backwards, 
no harm will be done. 

ill be back with more Ham To 
Ham tips next month, and please 
remember to send in your ideas 
to the address shown above and 
we'll publish the better ones in 
this column each month, plus 
send you 10 bucks for your time 
and trouble! 

73, DE Dave, NZ9E 

Note: The ideas and sugges- 
tions contributed to this column 
by its readers have not necessar- 
ily been tested by the column's 
moderator nor by the staff of 73 
magazine, and thus no guarantee 
of operational success is implied. 
Always use your own best judg- 
ment before modifying any elec- 
tronic item from the original 
equipment manufacturer's speci- 
fications. No responsibility is im- 
plied by the moderator or 73 
magazine for any equipment 
damage or malfunction resulting 
from information supplied in t his 
column. 



Ham help 



Number 23 on your Feedback card 



We are happy to provide Ham Help listings free on a space-available basis. 
To make our job easier and to ensure that your fisting is correct please type 
or print your request dearly, double-spaced, on a fuit (8 1/2 H x 11") sheet of 
paper. Use upper- and lowercase letters where appropriate. Also, print num- 
bers carefully— a 1 1 for example, can be misread as the fetters I or t\ or even 
the number 7. Specifically mention that your message is for the Ham Help 
column. Please r&member to acknowledge responses to your requests. 
Thank you for your cooperation. 



CIRCLE 269 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

72 73 Amateur Radio Today 9 October, 1995 



WANTED: To borrow service manu- 
al/schematics for SiNGER/ 
GERTSCH FM10CS Station Monitor 
Marvin Moss, Box 28601, Atlanta GA 
30358. 

WANTED: Manual for UNIDEN 
Bearcat Scanner BC 140 and infor- 
mation far modifications on this scan- 
ner. I will gladly pay for photocopies 
and postage. Tom Waller, 311 Hillside 
Dr., Greenville AL 36037. 

I need an operating and/or technical 
manual for the REALISTIC PRO 
2001 receiver. Anyone who can 
help please respond to Daniel Ander- 
son KB7PLO, RO. Box 5306, Apache 
Jet, AZ 85278. Or call (602) 484* 
1037. 



NEEDED: Any information or 
schematics, etc. T for an ATRONICS 
Code Reader (mfd. in Escondido CA). 
I will gladly pay for any costs incurred. 
Len VE31NK, Toronto Ontario, Canada 
M9B3W7. Tel. (416)233-4998. 

I need a copy of a manual and/or 
schematic for a DENTRON MLA 2500 
Linear Amplifier S am willing to pay xe- 
rox and postage costs. Call collect 
first. Edwin Barr K2HD, 3275 Light* 
house Way, Spring Hill FL 34607. Tel. 
(904) 688-7684. Thanks for any help. 

Regarding "FM Your IC-730/ an arti- 
cle which appeared in the December 
1985 issue of 73: 1 need the parts 
placement corrections for the FM2 
board. Can anyone help me? Eugene 

Fischer W7IOR, (360)293-6212. 



A 



DVERTISERS 



R»S*# page 

* A&A Engineering . 41 

351 Absolute Value Systems 17 

164 Ace Communications of 

I ndianapoiis .-,..„.. „„ ,«*24 

■ Advanced Info Group, Inc ...17 

149 Advantage Instruments Corp,.,, 37 
194 Ail Electron ics Co rpo rat ion 50 

* Alphalab . 51 

57 Antennas West ,., .,,,31 

340 Antennas West 30 

89 Antennas West 50 

116 Antennas West ...51 

5 Antennas West ,,..., r ,„ + .„ +r . T ..60 

332 Antennas West 77 

135 Antennas West 62 

107 Antennas West 64 

• Antique Radio Classified B2 

16 Astron Corporation 65 

41 Barry Electronics Corporation.., 47 

42 Btlal Company 82 

1B8 Buckmaster Publishing, ..47" 

56 Buckmaster Publishing ,....17* 

7 Buckmaster Publishing 63 

Burghardl Amateur Radio ....*. 9 

* Butternut Electronics..,.. , k+l .64 

222 Byers Chassis Kits 41 

1o4 U 9 b oBJss, Inc-i*i.+i+n+i iifHiOl 

• CABLE X-PERTS, INC ....77 

• CBC inSemalioa! 82 

* Centaur Electronics 17 

265 Chips witch ,„ .51 

• Command Productions „ 45 



R.S.# page 

156 Commpule Corporation ....54 

99 Communication Concepts.. ,.„.,, 47 
10 Communications 

Specialists, Inc. —38'" 

276 Computer Aided Technology..... 24 
268 Computer Automation 

Technology .38 

15 Comtelco Industries, Inc 50 

• Davis RF 54 



114 



8 
75 

329 

• 

193 
286 

78 

• 

293 

179 

42 

27 



E, H, Yost . 54 

Electronics Book Club 23 

Electronics Distributors 41 

Elktronics 75 

Fair Radio Sales.. 17 

For Hams Only...... 84 

'Ocil] UUCM ■ » ** * *■ ■ ma* *» ■ ■! ■ ■ i i"M ih» "" MM »M * 

VJ VJ I £■ ...... .. ..-...-•-.--,- rw rw« **+'*« *#* I ft + 0H 

Hambrew Magazine 30 

Ham Radio & More...™,—.,— 19 

Hamsune —..*...♦ .51 

Hamtronics, !nc.„. 7 

1C Engineering 17 

ICOM America, inc CV2* 

Isolron.,.,.. ... .82 

Jade Products. .,— . ..♦..*.. .*.♦— ,..17 

J.MS 24 

John Bell .... 70 

JRS Distributors,.. 82 

Kantrorucs, Inc, ...........».»1 

Kawa Productions 54 

KC42GL Ram Software...... 67 

K-Comm/The Ham Store..... 45 



H.3", 

151 

* 
234 



86 

■ 

160 
144 
345 
193 
248 

114 
290 
102 



66 
249 

49 
257 

153 

■ 

58 

34 

147 

254 



# page 

KDC Sound., 84 

Kenwood USA Corporation.. ,.CV4 

Lentinj Communications 36 

Maggiore Electronics Lab 64 

Meadowiake Corp, .,.,—45 

Memphis Amateur Elect » 47 

MFJ Enterprises ..<«.>,...,... ....11 

Michigan Radio .74 

Micro Computer Concepts 47 

Micro Control Specialties... 81 

Microtek . .92 

Morse Tutor Gold. 82 

Motion Electronics 74 

Mouser Electronics .......24 

Mr. Nicad.... .54 

Nye Engineering 54 

ONV Safety Belt .....50 

P.C. Electronics ....67* 

RC. Electronics ........72* 

Phillips Industries, Inc., 84 

PoJyphaser,,.. 33 

Quorum Communications 25 

M.dQIO wILV . .,.. r.L.. ,4. ....... J. .,....,.,., OO 

Radio Control Systems.. 36 

Radio Engineers ,...*. .„.,..„. ....... 51 

Ramsey Electronics........ 39* 

R.L Drake..,. 5 

Ross Distributing. ..........76 

RT Systems .... *..».. ....*,.. — . — ...54 

SAMS ..........54 



R.S.# page 

36 Scrambling News 84 

167 Sescom. Inc.. ......78 

92 Shack Attack. „...J77 

• Sirio Antenna. S.r.l 2 

250 Software Systems.......... 59 

51 Spectrum Communications 79 

69 Spectrum Elecironics... .50 

• Ten-Tec 29 

384 The Ham Contact. 13 

384 The Ham Contact. 57 

384 The Ham Contact 78 

131 The Ham Station , .........40 

• TJ. Antenna Company 45 

I UW Cl UUWO ■ * ■■■>■■■■■■ **■ ■■>*■«-■■ vm aM-Bn-n m*J^UT 

11 Transel Technologies......... 41 

22 Tri-Ex 64 

• Uncle Wayne's Bookshetf . ...86.87 

• Universal Radio... 54* 

• Van Go nden Engineering 70 

• Vanguard Labs,.. 83 

259 Versatel Communications ....77 

104 Vis Study Guides. Inc. .,.,60 

191 W & W Associates ............73 

38 W9INN Antennas 45 

• Wacom Products, Inc. ...41 

• Wheele r Ap p I i e d Research 45 

388 Willco Electronics.*,,,- — 83 

• Wolfe Com munica lions 60 

• Yaesu Electronics 
Corporation,... CV3 

' Advertisers who have contributed to the 
National Advisory Comnwnea (N1AC). 




BUY DIRECT FROM US, THE MANUFACTURER 



MasterCharger® I & Ha 




SPECIAL 

FOR THE 
MONTH OF OCTOBER 






ON ALL 





J 



By simply changing adaptor cups, the 

MasterCharger will charge any Yaesu, 

Motorola, fcom, Kenwood, Alinco, etc. 

2-Way Radfo Battery 



Replacement Batteries 

LOOK FOR NOVEMBERS 
SPECIAL OF THE MONTH 

MONTHLY DISCOUNTS 
APPLICABLE TO END-USERS ONLY 




MVS residents add 0.5% 
sates ta* -Acfd $4 DO for 
postage and ship ping. 



MasterCharger® 1 + 1 

ElectricaJry Identical to MasteiCftarger f 




If you have two different radios 
you'U only need one charger to 
accomodate both radios. Now by 
simply switching the switch to the 
left or right, you can determine 
which charging cup to activate. 



Prices and specifications su&ject to cnange without notice 

W & W ASSOCIATES 

800 South Broadway, Hieksvilfe, NY 1 1801 

In U.S.A. & Canada Call Toll Free 800-221-0732 

In NY State Call [5161 942-001 1 ■ Fax (S16J 942-1944 

World Wide Distributorships Available Please Inquire 



MADE IN 
THE U.S-A. 

SENOFOft 
FREE CATALOG 
AND PRICE LIST 



CIRCLE 191 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 73 



Never Say Die 

Continued from page 4 

chap from Illinois who was able to 
turn water Into gasoline with a 
green powder. He demonstrated it 
for the skeptical reporter, who then 
preceded to run his car on it. Of 
course, that was 22 years ago and 
Harley is fucking himself for not fol- 
lowing up on the idea, 

The chap with the secret powder 
was cautious, and asking billions for 
the Invention. He claimed that a Mr. 
Kraft had shown him the formula 
when he was 15* It was also shown 
to a friend of his, Anderson, who 
then went to the government and 
demonstrated it at the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard. Anderson disappeared 
the next day and has never been 
seen again. 

Scientific Evidence 

Do you personally have to see 
something to believe it? Supposing 
the same event is reported by sev- 
eral people around the world who 
have had no way to get together to 
concoct the story? Scientists have a 
problem believing in anything they 
can't reproduce on demand with 
100% reliability, yet there are a wide 
variety of things going on that don't 
fit in with those restrictions. 



While I've always had an Interest 
in the occult, UFOs T and other 
anomalies. I've been put off by the 
close-mindedness of many people 
who reject the experiences of oth- 
ers, When something unusual hap- 
pens, my instinct is to investigate it 
and try to understand what's going 
on, not to make every effort to reject 
or ignore it 

Scientists tend to sweep the un* 
explainable under the rug as 
"anomalies. 1 * For them that's 
enough of an explanation, and nev 
er mind trying to understand the 
anomaly or reproduce it. Doctors 
have the same mind-set, sweeping 
aside sudden cures for fatal illness- 
es as "spontaneous" cures. Thus, 
instead of trying to find out what 
brought about the "spontaneous" 
cure so it could be used to help oth- 
ers, they close their mental doors. 

For centuries people have been 
having near death experiences 
(NDEs). There's a magnificent book 
by Or, Crookall The Supreme Ad- 
venture, published in 1961, which 
examines hundreds of NDE reports 
and shows how remarkably consis- 
tent they are. He then takes the 
next step and examines hundreds 
of reports of the "next wortd" as re* 
ceived through mediums. These, 
too. are quite consistent with the 



NDE reports. It's almost enough to 
make a person think. 

I've read three recent books you 
might want to look for There's Dan- 
nion Brinkley's Saved By The Light 
(1995; 204 p), where he's struck by 
lightning and has quite an NDE, tfs 
worth the 56. Unlike most other visi- 
tors to "heaven,' this chap was giv- 
en some glimpses into the luture. if 
you've been keeping up with the lat- 
est in technology, you'll find his 
piece on the coming development 
of DNA-type computer systems 
most prescient for a 1975 NDE ex- 
perience. 

Then there's Mally Cox-Chap- 
man's The Case For Heaven (Put- 
nam 1995; 203p; $30). She tells in 
detail about her own experience, 
and then the stories of dozens o( 
more people she's interviewed 
who've had similar experiences. 
Having gradually become an old 
man, and thus perhaps a little more 
concerned with death, these "light™ 
books are of increasing interest to 
me. 

There's also Betty Eadie's Em- 
braced By The Light (1994; 145p; 
$6), You should be able to whip 
through it in less than an hour, She 
puts more of a religious interpreta- 
tion on heaven than most others 
who've been through the expert* 



ence, but her story is quite similar 
to all the others in most respects. 

Another NDE resource is Cherie 
Sutherland's Reborn tn The Light 
(1995; 303p; $6). Like the others, 
she reports on a number of people 
she's interviewed. Their stones are 
similar There is the pattern after 
the NDE of no longer fearing death, 
but looking forward to it Most come 
into contact with a Supreme Being 
who radiates love. Most are told 
they have tasks to do on earth be- 
fore going to heaven and so must 
return until it is their time. While 
most of them become more reli- 
gious, few continue going to orga- 
nized churches. They come back 
with the message that God isn't in- 
terested in theology. Most of them, 
while dead, undergo a life review 
where they experience what they 
fett and what the other people 
around them felt as a result of their 
actions. I have an ex-wife who's go- 
ing to have a major problem with 
that f and not a few ex-employees. 

Of course I can f t help, while 
reading about these NDEs, looking 
back at my life to see how I might 
have done better. My total lack of 
interest in money has been a hard- 
ship for my wife, who is much more 
money oriented. It* s also been a 
magnet for those who would take 






TS-50 



TH~79A<D) 



TM-251 



TS-60 



KENWOOD a 





Michigaah Radio% 

^ * SERVICE 

23040 Schoenherr, Warren T Ml 48089 

1-800-TRU-HAWIM (orders only) 

WORKING TOGETHER TO BRING YOU 
THE BEST QUALITY FOR THE BEST PRICE 

ocal k T«h 1*10*771471 i Service 1410-771 -171 Z f«i $enrc* 14fflK771-S46 




TH-22AT 
TK-48A 






3toi 



OOOti 




OPEN 
UON-FBHO-6 

SAT1SM. 
SUN CLOSED 




TM-241A 



TS-450AT 



TNt-733 








TS-850AT 




TS-950SDX 



ETTEimTTl 310 Garfield St Suite 4 OnIv 




■_ ■■■ . ■■ ■■ . kuboicz/«kj too on 

ELECTRON ICS Eugene, Oregon 97402 )77.vU 

The N EW 

Auto-KaII® 
AK'16 

DTMF Controller Board 
features 1 6 relay driver 
outputs and DTMF to 
X10 control capabilty! 

^CW ID >-0-12 digit security code >-User 
programable using your DTMF keypad! ^A5CII Serial 
Output of incoming DTMF > Watch -doq timer reset 
>* Relay driver outputs may be mated with our RB-8/1 
REM6/1 relay boards ^Several modes of operation 
allow combination© of real-time control on/off/ 
momentary output control and CW response tones 
>-Small size, only 275 X 3.25 inches >-12VDC @ 25ma 
Visa, MasterCarc), American Express, Djscovfr CarcI 
COD on CasIh or Money OrcIer bAsis onIv 

S/H: $6 USA; SIOCaIMAcIa; $!5FORMqiN. COD: $5 

Price and Specifications are subject to change without notice 

Orders: (800) 338-9058 

Info: (503) 687-2118 Fax: (503) G87-2492 
Catalogs are also available via the Internet 

motron.info@emerald.com 






CIRCLE 24$ OH READER SERVICE CARD 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today* October, 1995 



advantage of my lack of interest 
and who have robbed me of mil- 
lions. But, having (at least in my 
eyes) helped the world along with 
the development of cellular tele- 
phones, microcomputers, compact 
discs (better music), my record 
companies, and now (hopefully) 
cofd fusion, 1 feel my visit to earth 
has been worthwhile. 

My love of amateur radio has 
been guiding me for most of my life, 
Sure, I get frustrated when I hear 
hams using bad language and be- 
ing inconsiderate on the air. I al- 
most got angry when the ARRL vir- 
tually destroyed the hobby 30 years 
ago in their move to generate 
greater visibility for the League with 
their so-called "incentive licensing." 
And my ability to forgive, forget and 
love my enemies is sorely strained 
when people print lies and distor- 
tions about me. 

Another, slightly older book on 
NDEs is Dr. Moody 1 * The Light Be- 
yond, (1988; 205p; S4,5G). He even 
interviewed a number of children 
who'd had NDEs, with their stories 
all being quite consistent. 

The reports are that a whole 
realm of the afterlife is set aside for 
the pursuit of knowledge. Well, I've 
got a good start in that direction. 
When I die, it's going to take a trail- 



er truck to bring my library, and I'm 
not going anywhere permanent 
without it. If I can't take my books 
and music, I'm not going. 

Closer To The Light by Dr. Morse 
(1990; 237p; $6) deals with chil- 
dren's NDEs, What does it feel like 
for them when they die? What do 
they learn? WeVe going to have to 
understand more about how time 
works because many NDE reports 
have to do with future events. Youll 
also enjoy Brad Steiger's One with 
the Light (1994; 300p; $5) t which 
not only covers a wide variety of 
NDE reports, but shows how in ev- 
ery case the experience has sub- 
stantially changed the people's 
lives, 

If you've read very many biogra- 
phies, you know that many (most?) 
of our creative artists attribute much 
of their inspiration to the ineffable. 
Sousa said that all of his marches 
came to him when he was in a half- 
sleep state. They came full blown, 
so all he had to do was get up and 
write them down. Many composers 
and writers tell similar stories. In 
Neither Dead Nor Sleeping, May 
Sewall (Bobbs-Merrill, 1920; 320p; 
$2.50 in an old book store) wrote 
that her deceased husband ex- 
plained to her that spirits on "the 
other side" are responsible for 



these subconscious creative 
events. 

There's a current spate of books 
about guardian angels. The recent 
TV programs on angels probably 
triggered this interest. In between 
reading Peter Graneau's Ampere- 
Neumann Electrodynamics of Met- 
als, 111 whip through Hope Price's 
Angels, a $5 Avon inspirational 
pocket book that reports on hun- 
dreds of angel interventions. There 
are a bunch more angel books, all 
packed with stories of people 
who've been touched by them. 
Now, are you going to try to tell me 
that every single one of these peo- 
ple are totally mistaken? Give me a 
break! 

No, I can't see auras or bend 
spoons, but I have no good reason 
to disbelieve the many people I 
know who claim to have done these 
things. There are a great many 
things going on for which we have 
no good scientific explanation. Can 
you assure me that not one person 
in history has ever been abfe to 
dowse? My grandfather, who was 
an inventor, taught me how to 
dowse (to use a divining rode to 
find underground water or miner- 
als}. "Pop" was good at it. He also 
was a good inventor. You wouldn't 
see Citgo or Continental Can Com- 



pany around today except for him. 
He knew a lot about everything, so I 
accepted dowsing and had no trou- 
ble learning how to do it when I was 
about seven, Alas, he was a heavy 
smoker so he died when I was only 
12. My grandmother, who didn't 
smoke, lived on almost 30 years 
longer. Ill have to tell you more 
about her some time. She put me 
onto the Sewall book 3 years after 
she died. 

Though I haven't had a near- 
death experience, I still have a pret- 
ty good idea of what my mission in 
this life is. It's what fVe been doing 
for the last 44 years as a publisher: 
sharing the things I've found fun 
and exciting with you, and urging 
you to share with me. So I'm on 
your case, urging you to do better. 
To lose weight and thus live a 
longer and happier life. To not 
smoke. And to be adventurous. To 
try new things. To go new places. 
To try packet. To try satellite com- 
munications. To try going on a DX- 
pedition somewhere. To learn more. 
To read. 

If your reaction is negative, re- 
member that this could be an ap- 
proach to life that you carry around 
with you. Life is more what you 
make it than it is a box of choco- 
lates. If you're nasty, so will be the 



v -L 





£f WB8ELK/id 




VIDEO l.D. BOARD 



■m 



i#C. 



■*** 



x'^va* 




>»• 



s-jjsr 



•Custom Graphics with your CaJl Sign 

*4 Screens (2 Hi- res/2 color bar) 

•12 VDC Operation 

•Instant Video ID 

•Video Relay for switching in Live 

Camera Video 
•Built-in Automatic Sequencer-Timer 

(steps through all four screens) 

VDG-1 with pre-programmed calls: 

$99 

Calf or write for catalog of available graphics 

ELKTRON1CS 

1 2536 T.R. 77 * Findlay, OH 45840 
(419)422-8206 



WfiGSK 




mLVH-WBflELK 



ELJCTRONICS 

12536 TJfc 77 
Findtag, OH 15840 

C4IS> 422-&2M 



5\ KA8HLV 

>, 







FNM8 YAESl Uv 650mah 



PB-34 KENWOOD 9.6v 500raah 



PB-17KEMOOD12y800mah_ 
PB-18 KENWOOD 7,2v 140()mah 



ger QSO Time 

Regular Prke 



$49.80 



S66.9Q 



$54.00 



$49.95 



*uy your rt 
from the manufacturer. 



mmmmilMiMkMmmmm Wffl ! 



BP84S ICOM Ik 1400mah m mrnm mm. I 



iNWQOD 6v I200mafi mmm aow $40.00 



UEMv MGOntali 1«sai : m $42.50 



We also offer: 

Camcorder Batteries • Accessories • Cordless Phone Batteries 

Custom Battery Packs * ftiCad Cells • Lithium Cells 



■in 



Available 
from your 
dealer... 



CIRCLE d ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Buy tht battery pack from Periphex — 
where Batteries are our only business! 

iiiJsilPemPHOX inc. 

Plug into savings when you choose Periphex 

1-800-6343132 

Add S4.00 Shipping ^Handling for tint battery < SI. 110 foi each additional battery - \j& mAy * MA Pesidcnts add 5% tat. « Offer gjtiixl fonsi UckAer 1 thiough Brwiubei Jl. IggS 



Periphex, Inc. * 300 Centre Street • Holbrook, MA 02343 » (61 7) 767-5516 • (617) 7674599 



CIRCLE 68 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today * October, 1 995 75 



people around you. If you get on 
the air to have fun and meet new 
people, that's what you'll find, for 
the most part. When you run into an 
ill-mannered op. try another fre- 
quency instead of getting mad or 
getting even. 

One thing both the angel and the 
NOE reports all agree on is that 
prayer can be surpnsingly powerful 
It doesn't seem to matter what 
deities you believe in; just the act of 
praying has power to heal and 
change things, No. this is- not a new 
concept and it doesn't mean that 
poor, old, aging Wayne is newly 
converted to any particular savior. 
I "m just telling you what thousands 
of people I've read about have re* 
ported. 

As I'm writing this, I'm thoroughly 
enjoying a CD of Louis Moreau 
Gottschalk's (1829^1869) music 
His music was sort of a precursor of 
ragtime, and he was the first inter- 
nationally famous American com- 
poser. Though it's difficult for me to 
imagine, I suppose there are some 
people who might not find his music 
irresistible. His Tarantella, 
Responds Mot, Ojos Griolios. Orfa. 
La Gaitma, Bambouia. Grand Fan- 
tasta. and Pasquinade are incredi- 
ble. If I cant get you to enjoy read- 
ing books and learnmg. maybe I 
can turn you on to some wonderful 
music? No. all you want me to wnte 
about is ham radio, right? 

So what do you find the most ex- 
citing about amateur radio? What 
adventures have you had? If you've 
made even a tenth the number of 
friends via the hobby that I have, its 
paid off for you handsomely. That's 
probably what brings me back to 
Dayton every year most of all. 
When's the last time you had a con- 
tact where you talked with someone 
for over an hour and you both hated 
to end it? I used to offer a certificate 
for long-winded contacts; the Real 
Rag Chewer's Club certificate 
(RRGC) for contacts over an hour. 
Let me know if 1 should offer that 
again. 

Of course. I used to offer a WAAS 
(Wonted Almost All States) certifi- 
cate for hams who'd worked 49 
states. Then there was my CHC 
(Certificate Hater's Club) for hams 
who hate certificates and promise 
not to go after them; and if they do 
by chance get one, they promise to 
hate it. 

Maybe it's best I don't write 
about amateur radio and just stick 
to my secret goals of trying to get 
you to have more fun f to learn, and 
to shape up. 

Leasing The Spectrum 

The FCC's recent spectrum fire 
sale brought in $10 billion . . , just 
for a few more cellular phone chan- 
nels. Not bad, considering the 



FCCs annual $200 million budget, I 
know you aren't going to believe 
this, but Congress has noticed this 
new revenue source. 

The estimated value of the com- 
mercially used spectrum, according 
to Peter Hufoer in Forbes, is at least 
$200 billion. And that doesn't count 
the frequencies some projected 
new services are going to need, 
Leasing the currently used spec- 
trum could therefore be expected to 
provide at least an extra S20 billion 
a year for Congress either to re- 
duce the national debt or lo invesl 
In bigger and better pork. Guess 
which way I think they'll elect to go? 

So what is going to happen now 
that Congress has found that there 
is a megadollar value to those mi- 
crowave megahertz we haven't 
been bothering to use? Yes, I 
know — who cares as long as they 
leave 20m and 75m alone, right? It 
wasn't very long ago thatCQ- 



reason no one seems lo have 
picked up the ball. 

If the call is sent at around 20 
wpm, it would only require a 3-sec- 
ond wait before talking. This might 
present a problem for over-excited 
talkers, but most of us would soon 
learn to adapt to it. I'd also suggest 
a timer be built m which would pre- 
vent the identification from being 
sent more than once every 5 min- 
utes. It could also be programmed 
to butt in and identify every 10 min- 
utes if the transmitting operator 
happens to be as Jong winded as I. 

Instead of keying the transmitter 
on and off, it could send the call 
with a tone (MCW) t This would 
make it so you could talk over it il 
you just couldn't wait 3 seconds, 

This would make it possible to 
save a good deal of time spent in 
oral identification. The fact is that 
I'm quite familiar with my own ca]l, 
so it gets a bit tedious to hear the 



"Could you spare some time once or twice 
a week to visit a local school to teach some 
9-11 year olds about amateur 



tf 



Magazine proposed thai the 
146-1 48 MHz band be taken away 
from us and turned into a new CB 
band. Have you thanked them lor 
that yet? That was just before re- 
peaters got popular. Up until then 
the top two megahertz of 2m was 
almost unused. If we lose two or 
three microwave (satellite) bands, 
that could end our potential for de- 
veloping a worldwide ham net simi- 
lar to the Internet, 

Hmm, seems to me Ive written 
most of this before. Often. Anyone 
awake out there? 

A Great Role Model 

John Abbott K6YB has been get- 
ting some superb publicity for ama- 
teur radio in the LA. Times. Bravo, 
Thafs what we need. John has 
been teaching youngsters about ra- 
dio as a volunteer for 5 years. Car- 
ole Perry had a nice piece about his 
work m her December 1993 *Hams 
with Class" column. And Gordon 
West reviewed John's Riding's The 
Airwaves with Alpha and Zulu in 
Radio Fun. 

How about you? Could you spare 
some time once or twice a week to 
visit a local school to teach some 
9-11 year olds about amateur ra- 
dio? 

Auto-ldent? 

A letter from Ernest N7ULU of 
Phoenix suggests that our rigs 
might have a built-in chip that would 
automatically identify our station in 
code when the mike button is 
pushed. It's been some time since 
I've written about that, but for some 



chap Tm in contact with repeating it 
at the beginning and end of every 
transmission. Yes. I know we've 
been doing this ritual ever since 
hamming started. But that doesn't 
make it any more sensible. 

Of course, what I would much 
prefer is some work done on 
achieving what we should have 
done 50 years ago: duple* con- 
tacts, This one-way simplex busi- 
ness is right out of the smoke-signal 
age. When will I start hearing the 
ARRL petitioning the FCC for a 
return of spark? Maybe narrow- 
band spark T for better spectrum 
efficiency. 

The War On Poverty 

The recent PBS series on Presi- 
dent Johnson's futile war on poverty 
made it pretty clear that throwing 
money at the problem hasn't 
wortoed. Most of the thrown money 
ends up in the hands of the govern- 
ment bureaucrats. That reminds me 
of the quote about the missionaries 
going to Hawaii to do good, and do- 
ing very well indeed, America's "^var 
on poverty" has cost taxpayers tril- 
lions of dollars, and helped build an 
even larger federal bureaucracy 
which has made the poverty situa- 
tion worse. 

Maybe there is no solution to the 
poverty problem. Maybe there will 
always be poor people. Yes, there 
probably always will, but there dont 
have to be as many of them. Not 
nearly as many- So what's happen- 
ing that's generating generation 
after generation of poor people, 
and what can be done to break the 



insidious pattern? 

You may at first think I'm really 
stretching to claim that amateur ra- 
dio can be a big part of the solution. 
So how can I make the claim that 
amateur radio can be instrumental 
in helping eliminate much of the 
poverty in America (or anywhere 
else in the world, for that matter}? 

Lets start with fundamentals. If 
you've given any thought to the 
poverty problem, you've certainly 
noticed that there are very few real- 
ly poor people with good educa- 
tions. Oh, I know a couple, but they 
are certified nut cases and are thus 
unable to work despite their educa- 
tion. As a good general rule let's 
agree that education and poverty 
don n t go together. You may also 
have noticed that very few rich peo- 
ple are uneducated, This is not a 
coincidence. 

Okay T if we want to get rid of 
poverty we're going to have to 
somehow see that poor kids get ed- 
ucated. And this isn't going to be 
easy, 1 wont go into the gory de- 
tails, but were saddled with one of 
the worst government -run school 
systems in the world, plus parents 
who are busy teaching their chil- 
dren how to stay poor, and peer 
pressure (gangs) pushing them to 
drop out of school. 

Immigrant Asian parents, who 
emphasize the importance of edu- 
cation to their children, prove that 
the parents can have a powerful im- 
pact on their kids. Though often 
poor, they see to it that their chil- 
dren get a good education and 
move out of poverty, despite our ter- 
rible school system. 

There are some practical solu- 
tions to improving our schools and 
to generating an interest in poor 
parents to encourage their children 
to be educated. I've covered this 
territory in some depth in my 
Declare War book and its updates, 
so I won't repeat all that. 

Where Does Amateur Radio Fit 
In? 

It's a high-tech world , Our kids 
have to cope with the information 
superhighway, and that means 
computer literacy, a need to under- 
stand electronics, television, and so 
on. A generation ago we used type- 
writers, today it's word processors. 
It wasn't very long ago that we used 
pens, blotters and pen wipers. 
There aren't very many blotter man- 
ufacturers any more. II any. 

Just as there Is a strong parallel 
between education and success in 
life, in today's world there is also a 
parallel between high-tech and suc- 
cess. Scientists, engineers, and 
technicians are being more and 
more needed to fuel the changes in 
our society. Communications and 
transportation are speeding up and 



76 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 



getting cheaper This is putting ev- 
ery worker in America on a more 
level playing field witn workers 
around the world, if your job can be 
done as well or better by a foreign 
worker at a lower cost, you're going 
to lose out Job protection carft be 
legislated One's job protection is 
one's accumulation of skills and 
knowledge. 

Here comes amateur radio. 

As a scientifrc hobby amateur ra- 
dio has the potential for interesting 
youngsters in learning about elec- 
tronics and communications. Even 
computers are an integral part of 
hamming these days. One of the 
big keys to making our American 
school system more effective is to 
make it more fun to learn. Ham- 
ming, where we have a group of 
around 73 hobbies, has almost un- 
limited fun for youngsters. It is a key 
to getting them to learn because 
they want to, not because the gov- 
ernment will punish them if they 
don't go to school. 

Back in the 1950s, before our on- 
ly national amateur radio organiza- 
tion, the ARRL and their so-called 
"Incentive Licensing" proposal to 
the FCC, destroyed both the ham 
industry and the infrastructure 
which was feeding youngsters into 
the hobby, studies showed that 80% 
of all new licensees were young- 



sters and that 60% of those went on 
to higfvtech careers as a result. 
That's what happened to me. 

Indeed, amateur radio was the 
major supplier of scientists, engi- 
neers and technicians for our coun- 
try. When World War II came afong 
80% of our hams enlisted. As did L 
When I went to the Navy electronics 
school \ found hams everywhere. 
Virtually ail the instructors were 
hams. Later, when I went into ham 
publishing, I found that a high per- 
centage of the top people in the 
electronics and communications in- 
dustries were hams who had, like 
me, started in their teens. In the 
1950s 50% of a\\ new hams were 
14 oris years old! 

In those days virtually every high 
school had a ham radio club. That's 
what got me going. I went to Eras- 
mus Hall High School in Brooklyn 
(NY). My interest in building radios 
and listening to the short waves got 
me to join the club. From there on 
the club members got me to prac- 
tice the code and get my ham li- 
cense. These clubs were almost all 
wiped out by ARRUs Incentive Li- 
censing mess 30 years ago. That's 
when the hobby stopped growing, 
going from 11% growth per year (for 
18 years) to less than 1% most 
years since then. Thafs when every 
major ham equipment manufacturer 



and 85% of the ham dealers went 
out of business. 

Packet radio is an exciting as- 
pect of the hobby. It gets kids to 
team about computers and digital 
communications because they want 
to. Slow- and fast-scan television 
teaches them about video and digi- 
tal data compression. Ham satellite 
communications helps them leam 
to deal with microwaves, And all of 
this is real fun! 

I've been urging every ham radio 
dub in America to get busy and get 
radio clubs restarted in our schools 
so we can regain our lost amateur 
radio infrastructure. Today we need 
to get kids interested in high-tech 
when they are 8-10 years old. This 
is why I've proposed that we start 
teaching the fundamentals of elec- 
tronics in every school in grades 5* 
12. There is less and less need in 
business for people who are igno- 
rant of technology. Almost everyone 
has to deal with computers and 
communications in their work, so 
the more they understand what they 
are doing, the more valuable they 
are going to be- The man or woman 
who looks up helplessly when his or 
her computer stops working will be 
replaced by a more self-sufficient 
worker. 

We're heading into a world of 
video conferencing, telemarketing, 



and information handling. Good 
jobs await those with the skills and 
knowledge to deal with this world. 
Poverty awaits those who don't 
keep up. 

Amateur radio is by far the best 
hobby there is for getting young- 
sters interested in learning the 
things which will be more help to 
them later on. There are a bunch of 
other scientific hobbies, but none of 
them have such a wide variety of in- 
terests and excitement to offer. 

We have DXers, who are mainly 
interested in contacting foreign 
countries. We have specialists who 
love contests, who want to see how 
many countries they can contact on 
some particular ham band, such as 
160 or 80 meters. We have awards 
for contacting all states, and so on, 
which can be very difficult on some 
ham bands. We have weird oes (like 
me) who love to visit countries 
which haven't many active hams 
and get on the air for a few days, 
making thousands of short contacts 
and providing DXers with a confir- 
mation of a new country contacted. 

Most hams get interested in 
building their own equipment. Some 
buy kits and assemble them. Others 
buy the basic parts and build. At the 
Dayton hamfest every year there 
are acres of hams selling equip- 
ment and parts at the flea market. 



W 



here's the Beam? 




Unobiiusiv* DX Gain Antennas for SO rhru : ■ ■ 
E-La&ily bidden * Install Fast ■ Fiiwd or Portable ■ 

TVft ■ a 20 meter inltnna with «*1 DX PlHKA 

hidden id ib it pLcntf*. Yah cWi **e H, indiM>ur 
ne i jhhore cm'* either Bui it wwrfc* DX baflfocl 
Iflywty, How »b$u.t n low profile SO 40 30 m 
hinder? Or a : e1*rti*nT m*n>>KanJer fo* Ihe irtkfl 
AJI easily fit the pockerlwoik-FrivcJ $2$fi$ S^W. 

Work OX wirhoutieHihg ih« neighbor* 

tnfopickS] AnteHttiisWcst 

fU jQOAl-R. Prevn, L'T ^606 f8Ql > .173-8 -1 25 



CIRCLE 332 ON READER SEHVICE CARD 




Display Your Ham License in Style 

New* Call sign License Plaque" 

• Meet FCC Station ftequremams Sec 97 3 

• HirvJsome dark wood accents your snack 

• Y&ur call sign displayed in large T latter s 

• Great grff idea! tfi ship drect 

• Satisfaction Guaranteed? 

Only $19.95 -- : 

Catar Write Today! 



Shack Aturk 



800 573-7388 



CIRCLE 92 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



VHF REPEATER 



Make high quality VHF repeaters Irom 
Motorola MICOR mobiles. 

• 45 Watt Mobile - DUO ...$99 

■ Conversion Information $12 

CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 

(Information without radio purchase $40) 



Versatel Communications 

Orders 1400-456-5548 For info. 307-266-1700 
P.O. Sox 4012 • Casper, Wyoming 82604 



CIRCLE 259 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CABLE X-PERTS, INC. 



COAX (LOW LOSS GROUP) 100FT7UP500FT 

TLEOBLF seia FOIL 4»%BflAI0 2.7dB4 400 MHz 58JFT .56/FT 

Mi 3 EQUAL FOIL +85*. BRAID 27 (B 400 MH* .„ m _* .42?FT MfT 

»14F^WAL1FOAM H FOIL-f«fliBRA)C3.SdBfflflOOMHz WFT -3OTT 

LUR40Q DBLSHLD IIIA JACKET S7dB A 4S0MH2 S3/FT SO/FT 

LMftiOQOirafterDBLS^-TPFJlACKETSIcfl tASCUH* .. .7HFT 7Z-FT 

UWRflOOOeLSHLD III A JACKET r Hcfi fl 450MW . U7/FT 1 45FT 

LMRSOODBLSHLDilAJtfKE7U0*«4a<*ft* 4.0VFT 4JUFT 

LMR I3» DaSttOllU JACKET a»MB • «MHl^^ 45SFT 45*FT 



COAX (HF GROUP) 



9G2tl^MLSFtCD#tCTBl*aALJkO<£TtfcB#5JU^ 
B6WfOA*4»VBnDUVR£S^AWTMCltETl2ifi»50Urtj 

9Ci U*ISX5F%Bra}ajt.SLVER(x Cl£Aft i/Vfl£SJCT 

RG214V £3 S1_VER BRAD S*LDS tML-SPtC 

ffiX&V DBL 5LV51 5ttD "TEa&V Z5.000 W r t£BM 

ttl«flJ0&SLVB45H u D*TEFuair_ 

RQS&U fiS*. BRW . - . 

flGSfiA.ll A TC BRAID . 

«0 OHbl LADDER me - 



4«OHW LADDER LINE 16GA STRAAOEO 



tS*T 
13QfT 

11&FT 

is** 

.IMF! 
tSFJ 
.ttfFT 



jfcfT 
OTT 
1JFT 

37SFT 
TflPfFT 
13FT 
1S*T 
1UFT 
Ifi^T 



COAX W/SILVER TEFLON PL259*s EA END 

10Dn(^13AJMlL-SF^OIflECTeiAALJKTlUB*SOUHj(..._. S&ttUEA 

SOFT RQ21 3AJ W&L-SPEC OflECT BURIAL JKT 1 MB ft 50UKi J2S jQQfifl 

tOOFT RO&'U FOAM 95% BRD U V RESISTANT J KT I MB SOWHr SJ&.0Q/EA 

SOFT HOBrtJ FOAM 95% BRD UV RESISTANT JKT 1 #fl fl SflMriz S£Z5Q€A 



ROTOR CABLE 



100FTAJP500FT 



S87T &COND (B1fl Mffl) 1« rune up to l&h 6LK UV RES JKT 
4090 B^CONO (HI6 GAO) lor puna up to: 200ft BLK UV RES JKI 
1 4 1 S e/CONO [?J\ 4 6/ 1 B) lor runs up lo 300ft BLK UV RES JKT 

1BQA T1NNC0 COPPER 4C GRAY PVC JACKET.,..-,-.. 

1BGA TINNED COPPER Wt GRAY PVC JACKET..,....^,^.. 
laOA TINNED COPPER 7.-C GRAY PVC JACKET 

ANTENNA WIRE 

UGA m STR -9UPERFLEX- LWiNSULATEB _„ 

14GA im *HARD DRAWV BC UWGULATED 



1 4QA SOLID -COPPERWELD" UNH^ILATED 
3 *GA SCUD ^BARE COPPER - UWNSULATEO . 
12GA1 WS 'BARE COPPER- UNNSULATEE _ 
J6GA ?M0 "BARE: COPPER* PVC feULAtEB 

1<GAI13G'BA«CGI , PER*PvCi*6ULATtCh 
T2i>6*X'BAfl£ COPPER* PVC INSULA TED 
WCBON HOPE 0BLBR0M677W TEST 



^2/FT 

... 3*FT 

40/FT 

.„„ 3WFT 

.... 2&FT 

_, -WFT 



1»FT 
tQ#T 
OftFT 
D»fT 
13#T 

oarr 
iuft 

iTfT 
13FT 



AUTOMOTIVE "ZIP" CORD 

lOOA2C*PLEXa^OlLlGASflESKTANTREElflU£'ZiP' 40fT 

i^GAiCTLEXfiLFOLAGAS HESlSFANT RHMLKTIP" JOFT 

1 BOA. laOA 4 14flA 9HOM0 T« 

BALUNS 

WZAU 1 1 OR* II M MHZ TRANSFORMER TYPE 

«WlMB«MHZClHTTTYreDPOLEOHBEAll 

WJDUlll^XMHe IN LINE" CUWENT OALUW 



2CHFT 
36/FT 
4MT 
1*FT 
2QIFT 

j*vn 

IWFT 

.tWFT 
UTtFT 
GMT 
1LTT 
OtifT 
_-ifT 
1SFT 
tiHT 



LAD0EMJDC 



PRICE 

IMOOtA 
«J0QEA 

t»S0€A 

til 



GROUNDING BRAID 

1' TINNED COPPEflBWJ ?5FTS£J1» 5QFTiM0O IttlFTWflO LONGER 

l^TWMEO COPPER BRAD 25FTS12.» 5OFTS25 0C lOOFTWOO LENQTHSTOO 

CONNECTORS 

PliSBSILVEH/nFLOWOOlIlTIP. lOPKSIllQO 5SPKS 125.00 

V CONNECTOR GILVER/QOLD TIP..... ,.,...,.,..... 10PKS 132.50 25 PKS*75.0O 



We irsiaW out c?mvn«ctW5 
p^jSSiTl-CaiwecU" 



MORE ITEMS STOCKED CABLE & WIRE COT TO YOUR SPECIFIC LENG THI 

ORDERS ONLY: 800-828-3340 4*» 

TECH INFO: 708-506-1886 FAX: 708-506-1970 \^**m 

113 McHenry Rd. T Suite 240 t Buffalo Grove, IL 60089-1797 L^f^ 



73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 77 



There are over 500 such exhibits. 
Arid parts are being sold at every 
hamfest and convention around the 
country. It's fun to build and gel 
something new to work. 

Unless we in America use every 
stratagem to get our kids to build 
their skills and high-tech knowl- 
edge, youngsters in other countries 
are going to take away their jobs. 
Just look at the way Asian countries 
such as Japan. Taiwan. Hong Kong, 
Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, and 
India nave been pulling themselves 
Trom incredible poverty to wealth. 
I've been visiting these countries for 
over 35 years now and 1 have seen 
the unbelievable changes first 
hand, in Japan, there are more than 
twice as many ham radio operators 
per capita as we have. Every 
school in Japan has a radio club. Is 
it any wonder they've been able to 
take away every consumer elec- 
tronics industry of ours? 

We invented the transistor, they 
developed and marketed it. We in- 
vented video tape, they developed 
and marketed it And so on. We 
don't make TV sets any more. We 
dori'l make cassette recorders or 
VCRs, Japan makes about 90% of 
our audio equipment When I visit 
their factories in Japan I am met by 
Japanese hams at every turn. 



What can you do about all this? 
That's easy, start helping your locaJ 
schools to form radio dubs and get 
kids interested in amateur radio, it'll 
be the best thing you can do tor the 
kids, for America, and for yourself. 
Yes, the school administrators will 
probably fight you at every turn. Try 
my motto: Never Say Die? Get on 
your local school board and keep 
the pressure on. We need tens ot 
thousands of school radio clubs and 
millions of new hams. Maybe tens 
ot millions. We have more than 
enough frequencies available, 
Heck, we're using less than 3% of 
our ham bands today. 

What are you doing just sitting 
there? Why aren't you on the phone 
calling your local schools to arrange 
to talk with the 8-10 year old kids 
about hamming? 

Amateur radio, properly applied, 
has the potential to do more for an- 
ti-poverty than all of the enormously 
wasteful government programs. In 
the long run we'll have a far more 
stable society when we have as few 
people in poverty as possible. The 
extremes of wealth and the tack of it 
feed discontent, as we see our 
politicians using to their advantage 
at every turn. The more we can 
build up our middle class and elimi- 
nate our poor and rich, the less Jeal- 



ousy and envy well have dividing 
us. But it's up to us to do some- 
thing, not our politicians or bureau- 
crats, who are in bed together. 

The millions of bureaucrats kept 
in business by anti-poverty pro* 
grams and welfare have a powerful 
vested interest in maintaining 
poverty and welfare. Why on earth 
should a welfare worker do any- 
thing which is going to get people 
off of welfare? That's shooting 
themselves in the foot. In the long 
run your choice is to let things go 
along as they have, sending a large 
part of your earnings to the govern- 
ment to distribute, or to start your 
own private war against the status 
quo by striking sparks to enlighten 
the minds of our kids, 

I can do no more than give you 
the tools and point out a worthy 
goaL I cant come to your home and 
yank you off your sofa, away from 
that ball game, or from your ham rig 
where you are probably adding to a 
pileup trying to get a 15-second 
contact with some guy in a rare 
country. Or checking into a net for 
the benefit of no one whatever. Our 
kids need your help. And so does 
our country. And so does amateur 
radio. 

Yes* 1 mentioned my book r We 
The People Declare War On Our 



Lousy Government Do you read 
books? i review interesting books 
IVe read in my 73 editorials. In my 
book I provide proposals for simple, 
inexpensive ways to help solve our 
more serious social problems. Like 
our tenible school system. Our un- 
healthy so-called health care sys- 
tem. Crime, drugs, foreign aid* and 
stuff like that. 

At Dayton this year there was a 
parade of hundreds of 73 readers 
coming by my booth to say how 
much they enjoy my editorials. 
Many claimed that I've changed 
their lives. So 111 keep writing . , , 
about amateur radio and the fun it 
can provide . . ♦ about how we can 
use this to help the whole world. 
And about anything else I find fun 
and thus want to share with you, 

Next Month? 

After several pages of small type 
III bet you think Ive run out of 
things to write about. No way- Next 
month I'll get into some books I've 
read recently on how to stay totally 
healthy and live to be a hundred or 
more. Will I be able to change your 
whole life around, making it so 
you'll never have to worry about 
cancer, heart by- pass operations. 
Alzheimer's, and so on? Only ff you 
pay attention to Uncle Wayne, 




BUY AMERICAN, BETTER PRICE AND QUALITY 



The SG2QQ0 HF transceiver is type accepted for commensal and marine service 
mad© wfth Traditional US, commercial radio quality (and q( cwnse it can be used 
on Ihe ham bands also). While the Japanese radios have 2 final transistors thai 
strain to put out 100 watts on tha low bands and only 75-B5 watts on ten meters, 
the SG200C has 4 iarq;j tfarUBteton tkit i,,.;ii .slor^; II 150 watts on ALL ThE 
BANDS INCLUDING 10 METERS' Some ot (he SG2000 features are: 1) A 
conlrot head remoiable (no special Jdi necessary) up to ISO' away from the rig, 
perfect for automobiles and boats. Up to 8 heads can be utilized and used as 
Intercoms also, 23 The largos I display of any HF transceiver. 3) 644 pre- 
programmed memories and 100 user programmable momorles. 4) operable (rem 
-&0F M5C) to 165F (4a5C). You want quality right? Here is what EVERY 
S62000 must endure before they're shipped fnam the factory; i) They're factory 
aligned, 2) EVERY SG2000 ts keyed down at full power (CW 150 Watts) into an 
open antenna for about 10 seconds, I hen connected to a storied antenna and 
keyed down Tor an additional 10 second*. 3) EVERY SG2000 Is put tn the 

"BURN*IN" rack and keyed down for 24 hours norv-StOp at Ml power CW Don't try that with tha lorefgn radios, 4) EVERY SG2000 is 

then re-checked for alignment and put in the TORTURE RACK* where they ane keyed on and off every 10 seconds for 24 hours. 5? 

Tn* SG2000 is men re-evaluated and an control furcnorts are verified to ensure that me microprocessor is up so spec. THEN AND 

ONLY THEN IS THE SG2000 ALLOWED TO LEAVE THE FACTORY. 

The bottom fane is price, you know how expensive commercial ngs am normally we are setting the SG2000 BELOW DEALER COST 

ft] only $1 ,449 00 eachM That's a $400.00 savings! We guarantee Ins best price. 



The SG230 SMART-TUNER is U>e best HF auldtuner at any price, and to 
p mrncte a product thai & made m the USA, were offering it at the gua/anieed 
best price of only 5449.00" WHV THE SG230? BECAUSE: When you tune an 
antenna at tfs base you are resonating the antenna, instead of just matching [he 
coax to the radio as with other luneis such as the ATM. etc The result YOUR 
SIGNAL GETS OUT MUCH BETTER The Kenwood Aim AT4S0 snd otfier 
similar tuners can only match 3:1 mismatches (YES only 3. 1 ) so forget matching 
anything but a tatty decent antenna. The SG230 can match from 0.5 Ohm to 10 
kdonm antennas {up to a 200: t mismatch), so n car easfiy match random wires, 
dicoies. ranvgutters. Shopping carts, efc. The result MORE POWEft. 

To ■ order, send check or money order with 56 50 tor sJiippFng, aJcmg wath your ahlppifig address f sorry no U.S. Post 
Office Boxes. UPS will not deliver} and Telephone number to. 





Guaranteed 
Best 
price* 



Joe Brancato 

THE HAM CONTACT 

PO Box 3624 3 Dept 73 
Long Beach, CA 90803 

CA Residents Add S MA% Sale* Tex Alaska, Hawaii, and Canadian Rn*id*nti please send U S Money Order 
+ Si 710 for shipping 

Serving The LORD If you wish more information please send a SASE to the above address For COD orders, call 
Since t987 (310)433-5860, outside of CA Orders Only can (80QJ933-H AM4 and leave a message. 



CIRCLE 3B4 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Mini Proiect Boxes 




_'.H_I 

5.15 
I K 



lATICqBlPLE'.Hi 
K. SO i ■ill *BLE 



CHEAT LITTLE BOXES 

FOR LOW COST CONSTRUCTION 

DESIGNED TO GET THE JOB 

DONE WITHOUT THE FRfUS* 

C4IT BARE r 

ALUMINUM PANELS Aa 



*«*■' 




FQH I MFD QN 
OTHER 

ENCLDEUHEE 
REQUEST FfJ££ 

cfjMSTnuc tci n ■■& 

CATALOG 




ORDER TODAY* {S30 OO MINIMUM O«0€R) 
ALL f**4f£:t£S itvCTLLtCrE kVO«i_0*V/0*r &f*If*f*t*Kit 

A i r -. US* CANADA & MELXICO: Q l€. HLG1 OP wOM.Lt> 



j3E 



A ORDER (800} £34-345? a FAX tSOOr 5&1- 2?* 9 

(702) 565-3*00 ■ FAX (702) 56*4326 
SESCOMvlNC 21QC WARD Dfi r&MftSOH NV 0»t3 



CIRCLE 167 ON READER SEHVtCE CARD 



rpc I ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 
SPECIAL 



KENWOOD TM-241A 

Under $320-00 

Similar savings on Standard. ICQM. 
Aston Yaesu, Cruahcraft. Almcc, Etc 
AIIL.T.O. 

KENWOOD TS-950SD 
KENWOOD pb-io 




$2995,00 
$35.00 



Over saoo ham items m stock 

ALL PRICES CASH FOB PRESTON 

LOOKfNG FOR SOMETHING NOT LISTED? 

CALL OR WRITE 

TS S Stale Street. Preston, ID 83763 
H&ur*: Tues -Frj 9-fi, $-2 Mondays 

Down s™ Saturdays (208) 852-0830 



Closed All Day Sunday 



CIRCLE 254 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



Spectrum Repeater/Link 



FL-4 UHF 

Helical Resonators 

Installed in Receiver 

or FL-4H Preselector Unit 




High Performance Boards & Sub-Assemblies 

These are professional "Commercial Grade" Units-Designed for 
Extreme Environments (-30 to 60°C.) All Equipment Assembled & Tested. 

For 2M, 220 MHz, & 440 MHz 

ID250A CW ID 

& Audio Mixer Board 

• Now includes "audio mute" 
circuit and "Emergency Power ID" 
option. 

• 4 input AF Mixer & Local Mic. amp. 
« PROM Memofy--250 bits/channel. 

• Up to 4 different ID channels! 

• Many other features. Factory programmed. 



COMPLETE SHIELDED RCVR. ASSY. 

VHF & UHF Receiver Boards 

SCR200A-VHF SCR450A-UHF 

* Totally Advanced Design! 

• S Pole Front End FItr, + wide dynamic range— 
Reduces Overload, Spurious Resp, & Interrnod. 

• Sens. 0.25 ^W12dBSINADtyp. 

* Sel.-SdB @ ±6.5 KHz,-130dB ® ±3GKHz. (8 Pole 
Crystaf + 4 Pole Ceramic Fltrs, 

* H S Meter 1 , Discriminator & Deviation Mtr. Outputs! 

• Exc. audio quality! Fast squelch! w/0.0005% Crystal. 
"("Si/per Sharp" IF Fit a!$o avail.) 

• New! 30 KHz B.W. IF Filter 
f or High Speed Packet. 

Complete Receiver Assemblies 

* Rcvt, Board mounted in shielded housing, 

♦ Completely assembled & tested, w/F.T. caps, 
S0239 conn- 

* As used in the SCR 1400 

• Ready to drop into your system! 1 

• UHF Rcvr. Assy. Now Available w/Super Sharp FL- 
4 Helical Resonators. GreatEy reduces IM & "out of 
band" interference! 




FL-4H 



Receiver Front End Preselectors 

* FL-6:6Hi Q Resonators with Lo-Noise Transistor 
Amp (2M or 220 MHz) 

* FL-4H: 4Hi Q Helical Resonators & Lo-Noise Tr. 
Amp. in shielded housing. {420-470 MHz) 

* Provides tremendous rejection of "out-ot- 
baruT signals w/out the usual loss! Can often be 
used instead of targe expensive cavity filters. 

* Extremely helplul at sites with many nearby trans- 
mitters to "filter-out" these out-of-band signals. 

Call or Write for 



Data Sheets 




SCT410B 
TRANSMITTER ASSY. 



CTC100 Rptr. COR Timer/Control Bd. SCT1 10 VHF Xmtr/Exciter Board 



Complete solid state control for iptr, COR, "Hang" 
Timer, Time-Out" Timer, TX local & remote Shut- 
down/Reset, etc 

Includes inputs & ouipouts for panel controls & 
lamps. 







*? 



Plug-in 
Coding Card 



TTC300 TOUCH TONE CONTROLLER 

• High performance, versatile design. To control any 
ON/OFF Function at a remote site via DTMF Radio 
Link. 

• Uses high quatity Xtal Controlled Decoder IC. w/ 
high immunity to falsing 

• Decodes all 16 digits 

3 ON/OFF Functions per Main Card, Easily expand* 
able to any no. of functions w/Expansion Cards. 

• Codes quickty field programmable via plug-in Cod- 
ing Cards. Many unique 3-digit codes available. Not 
basically 1 -digit as wrth competitive units. 
Latched or pulsed outputs. 

• Transistor Switch outputs can directly trigger soiid 
state circuitry or relays, etc, for any type of control 
function, 

• Low Power Consumption CMOS Technology, 



10 Wts, Output. 100% Duty Cycle! 

Withstands High VSWR 

True FM for exc, audio quality 

Designed specifically for continuous rptr. service, 

Very low in "white noise 

Spunous— 75 dB. Harmonics— 60dB. 

With .0005% precision grade xtaL 

8A-30 30 Wt, Amp board & Heat sink 3 sec L. P 

filter 4 rel.pwr. sensor. 

BA75 75 Wt. unit also available 



SCCT1 10 Transmitter Assembly 

• SCT110 mounted in shielded housing 

• Same as used on SCR 1400 

• Completely assmbid. s/F.T. caps, S0239 conn 

• 10, 30, or 75 Wt. unit. 



SCT 410B UHF Transmitter Bd or Assy. 

• Similar to SCT110 r 10 Wts. nom, 

• Includes "on board" proportional Xtal 
Osc/Oven circuitry for very high stability! 

• BA-40 40W, UHF AMP. BD. & HEAT SINK 





SCP30 HEAVY DUTY 30 AMP 
RACK MT. POWER SUPPLY 

• 1 3.8 VDC out. 1 1 5/230 I in 50/60 Hz. 

• Massive 30 lb. Transformer & Heat Sinks, 
*The most Rugged & Reliable Supply 

available in this range. 

SCA100 HIGH POWER AMPS 

• 1 50W-2M *1 O0W-440MHZ 

• 1 00% Duty Cycle • FM or C W 



SCT910 900MHZ 

Transmitter Assembly 

* Commercial Unit 

* Similar to SCT1 1 0, but 1 5 or 40 Wts, 

* includes high stability xtal osc./oven module 

* With cooling fan, for 100% duty 

* Ideal for Repeaters, Links, Etc. 

A Complete Line of 
2M, 220 & 440 MHz 

Repeaters & Accessories 

is also available. 

Thousands in use 

throughout the world! 




SPECTRUM C0MMUNICA TIONS CORP. 

1055 W. Germantown Pk, S4 • Norrfstown, PA 19403 (610) 631-1710 * Fax: (610) 631-5017 



CIRCLE 51 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Propagation 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 



Dennis Kopecky WJ2R 
P.O. Box 875 
Rahway, NJ 07065 

Conditions This Month 

This month has the appear* 
ance of being one of the best 
months for HF communication in 
the past several months. Fall con- 
ditions prevail and the only really 
POOR days forecast are expect- 
ed to be the 12th, 13th, 30th, and 
31st. The calendar shows that 
very GOOD days are extended 
from the 15th through the 29th, 
with only a few of those days (15, 
21-23, 28-29 trending to Fair), 
Remember, though, that Cycle 22 
is drawing to a close and that 
most HF bands wiM soon be at 
their lowest ebb. Make the most 
of this month with your finest op- 
erating skills! 

Weather-wise, the 12th and 
13th and the 30th and 31st may 
produce storms and/or other geo- 
physical upsets. Be prepared a 
day or two either way. 



Dennis Kopecky WJ2R 

10 and 12 Meters 

Not expected to be very good, 
but still should be monitored for 
iransequatoriat tropical paths dur- 
ing the daylight hours. 

15 and 17 Meters 

Similar in overall outlook as 10 
and 12 Meters, but with better 
chances to work DX because of 
the outright popularity of these 
bands throughout our worldwide 
community, 

20 Meters 

This is your workhorse band for 
worldwide DX during the daylight 
hours this month, with occasional 
openings beyond local time sun* 
set, moving from east to west, and 
long skip north and south. 

40 Meters 

DX on this band should be 
available from just before sunset 
until just after sunrise, which also 
means broadcast station interfer- 
ence in the phone portion of the 
band. Concentrate on the days 



OCTOBER 1995 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT 


1 F 


2 F-G 


3 F-G 


4 F-G 


5 G-F 


6 F 


7 F-P 


8 F 


9 F-G ! 


10 G-F 


11 F-P 


12 P 


13 P 


14 P-F 


15 F-G 


16 P 


17 F 


18 F 


19 G 


20 G 


21 G-F 


22 F 


23 F-G 


24 G 


25 G 


26 G 


27 G 


28 G-F 


29 F-P 


30 P 


31 P 











marked fair or even poor, as condi- 
tions on the higher bands (which 
should still be checked) may make 
them unusable. 

SO and 160 Meters 

Expect some fairly good DX and 
short-skip openings during the 
hours of darkness, which will be 
lengthening the time we will be 
able to pursue our pastime' 



VLF (160-190 kcs,} 

Anyone with interesting hap- 
penings in this portion of the 
spectrum is invited to contact me. 
I'd like to receive data regarding 
conditions over a period of time — 
that is, fair, improving to very 
good over a period of days, and 
vice versa, with signal levels, dis- 
tances worked, time of day, etc^ 
(the usuat stuff! TNX), 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: | 


GMT. 00 02 m 06 08 M 20 22 


Alaska 




j 






20 


20 






ARGENTINA 
















19 


15 


15 


>5 


AUSTRALIA 












40 


20 


20 






15 


T5 


CANAL ZONE 


20 


40 


40 


■ 


l) 




23 


15 


15 


15 


IS 


2D 


ENGLAND 


■JO 


40 








SO [ 20 


20 


20 






HAWAII 




20 






40 


40 


£0 


20 








|| 


INDIA 














£0 


£0 








• 


JAPAN 














20 


20 








MEXICO 




40 


40 


•l;. 


40 




20 


15 


15 


15 


15 




PHILIPPINES 














-V 


20 










PUERTO R1CO 




40 


.10 


40 


40 




20 


15 


15 


15 


15 




SOUTH AFRICA 
















ts 


13 


15 




USSR- 












20 


20 










WEST COAST 




m 


n 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


20 










CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: I 


ALASKA 


20 












'5 






URGENT V- 




















13 


15 


15 


AUSTRALIA 


ts 


20 








tj 


_. 


20 








15 


CANAL ZO^E 


20 


20 


m 


40 


40 


40 






if 


15 


IS 


20 


:■ :.•■■.- 


m 


« 










30 


■ 


20 


20 




HAWAil 


i* 


20 


?: 


n 


40 


m 


40 










19 


INDEA 
















20 


20 








i-- , 














20 


:•: 






MCAlwU 


20 


20 


40 


« 


«i 


'--■ 






15 


'5 


15 j 


to 


PHOjmNES 
















20 


B 








PUERTO RICO 


20 


20 


■»: 


tZ 


40 


40 






15 


15 


15 


30 


SOUTH AFRSCA 


















•* 


15 


20 


U S.S H 












i-,^ 


| 20 








WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


20 


:•::■ 20 




40 


40 


40 


40 








15 


ARGENTINA 


15 


ft) 




40 


40 


JO 










' c . 


15 


AUSTRALIA 




15 


20 


20 






40 


40 










CANAL ZONE 






20 


20 


:c 


20 


20 | 30 








15 


ENGLAND 


















20 


20 






HAWAII 


15 


20 


20 


40 


40 


40 


40 










ts 


INDIA 




20 


20 


















JAPAN 


20 


20 


20 






40 


40 40 






20 


20 


MEXICO 






a 


20 


20 


20 


20 








1 15 


PHILIPPINES 


15 










40 




20 








PUERTO RICO 






so 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 








19 


SOUTH AFRICA 




















15 


ts 




U.S5R. 
















3) 








5A5T COAST 




» 


» 


40 


-: 


-". 


:" 1 20 


:; 


K 




« . 



AN INVITATION FOR YOU TO JOIN THE GREEN TEAM 



73, Radio Fun, and ''Cold Fusion 1 ' magazines are actively 
recruiting more members for the lean, mean, Wayne 
Green team here in Peterborough. Translation: Wayne's 
hiring experienced and/or trainee employees. 

Wayne needs an assistant technical editor now. Non- 
smoking ham with technical, editing and/or writing abilities 
would be near perfect because setting up and maintaining 
W2NSD , s ham shack and reviewing equipment and 
manuscripts are some of the main responsibilities. The 
final focus will be a metamorphosis to Editor-in-Chief 
desk. Translation: Wayne wants someone capable (tech- 
nically literate) to manage the magazines so W2NSD can 
go on more DXpeditions. 



Other career opportunities abound for MAC literate 
people who know how to use Microsoft Word, Quark 
Xpress and/or AdobePhotoshop, create technical draw- 
ings, edit manuscripts, etc. There's a need for circula- 
tion management and advertising sales people too. 
Translation: Help wanted. 

What skills do you have to offer? If you are a non-smoker 
and in the southern NH area, please contact Frances Hy- 
varian at 603-924-0058 or FAX 603-924-8613 for an inter- 
view or send detailed resume which includes your work 
experiences, future ambitions, and phone number to 
Green Team, 73 Magazine, 70 Rte. 202 N, Peterborough, 
NH 03458. 



80 73 Amateur Radio Today • October 1995 



W& Number 25 on 1 

Barter w buy 



your Feedback card 



Turn your old ham and computer gear into cash now. Sure 4 you can wait for a hamfest to try 
and dump it, but you know yooll gel a far more realistic price if you have it out where 1 00,000 ac- 
tive ham potential buyers can see it than the few hundred Jocal hams who come by a flea market 
tabfe. Check your attic, garage, cellar and dose! shelves and get cash for your ham and computer 
gear before it's too old to sell. You know youYe not going to use it again, so why leave it for your 
widow to throw out? That stuff isn't getting any yourajeri 

The 73 Flea Mattel, Barter p n' Buy, costs you peanuts (almost)— comes to 35 cents a word for 
individual (noncommercial) ads and $1.00 a word lor commercial ads DorVl plan on telling a long 
story. Use abbreviations, cram it in. But be honest. There are plenty of hams who love to fix things, 
so if il doesn't work, say so. 

Make your list, count the words, including your call, address and phone number. Include a 
check or your credit card number and expiration, if you're placing a commercial ad, include an ad- 
ditional phone number, separate from your ad. 

This is a monthly magazine, not a daily newspaper, so figure a couple months before the ac- 
tion starts; then be prepared. If you get too many calls, you priced ft low. If you don't get many 
calls, too high. 

So get busy. Blow the dust off. check everything out, make sure it still works right and maybe 
you can help make a ham newcomer or retired oid-limer happy with that rig you're not using now. 
Or you might get busy on your computer and put together a iist of small gear/parts to send to 
those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to Ihe Barter 'n' Buy, 73 Magazine, 70 Rte. 2Q2N, Peterborough 
NH 03458, and get set for ihe phone calls. 



The deadline for the December 
1995 classified ad section is 
October 12, 1995. 

ALL ABOUT CRYSTAL SETS. 

Theory and construction of crystal 
set radios. $9.95 each, ppd USA, 
Send to; ALLABOUT BOOKS, 
Dept. S, P.O. Box 22366, San 
Diego CA 92192. BNB200 



WANTEDWestern electric ampli- 
fiers, tubes, speakers & parts. 
Free Quote! 1-800-251-5454. 

BNB26S 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR. Fast 
turn around. SOUTHERN TECH- 
NOLOGIES AMATEUR RADIO, 

10715 SW 190th Street #9, Mia- 
mi FL 33157. (305)238-3327. 

BNB295 



KENWOOD AUTHORIZED RE- 
PAIR. Also ICOM, Yaesu. GRO- 
TON ELECTRONICS, Box 379, 
Groton MA 01450. (508)448-3322. 

BNB310 

NOW ON 40 METERS! NEW, 
KNOB-TUNED w/DIGITAL DIS- 
PLAY, SYNTHESIZED qrp 
transceiver. Complete kit only 
$199.95. S&H $7.50 (continental 
US). GUARANTEED TO WORK. 
For info send SASE: Call/write to 
order: S & S ENGINEERING, 
14102 Brown Road, Smithsburg 
MD 21783; (301)416-0661. 

BNB334 

RCI-295Q/2970: New modification 
manual including Power increase. 
Clarifier modification. Modulation 
increase. Operating hints, and 
more. Parts included. Only $20.00 
ppd in U.S. (Missouri residents 
add $1.15 tax). SCOTT, P.O. Box 
510408, St., Louis MO 63151- 
0408. (314)846-0252. Money Or- 
dersorC.O.D. BNB340 

HR2510, RCI29S0, CONNEX 
3300, COBRA 148, GALAXY 
SATURN, plus many more kits to 
increase your modulation, $19.95. 
(800)536-0109. BNB350 



WANTED: Squires-Sanders 
SS1BS, SS1RS, SS1R, SS1V 
WEBER, 4845 West 107 Street, 
OAK Lawn lllinois,60453-52S2. 

BNB381 

NI-CD BATTERY analyzer cycler. 
PC controlled, DOS software. 
$289 PO Box 672 1 London, On- 
tario Canada N6A 4Y4 Lamantia 
Products 519-472-5566 Fax 
519-472-1702. BN6385 

SOLAR PANELS 1 7volts at 
4.45amps. Best one made. 10- 
year warantee. $450 plus $15 
S&H plus 7.5% tax CA. residents. 
Free shipping >3. Check or mon- 
ey order to Pacific Coast Proto- 
type 215 Lake Blvd. Unit 251, 
Redding CA. 96003-2506. Phone 
1(916)472-3091. BNB395 

IT'S BACK! The return of the 
HW-8 Handbook! Second print- 
ing. Modifications for the Heath 
QRP rigs. First class mail $11. 
DX add $4 for air mail shipping. 
Mike Bryce, WB8VGE, 2225 
Mayflower NW, Massillon OH 
44647. BNB404 

Continued on page 82 



here is the next generation Repeater 



MARK 4CR 



The only repeaters and controllers 
with REAL SPEECH! 



No other repeaters or controllers match 
Mark 4 in capability and features. That's 
why Mark 4 is the performance leader at 
amateur and commercial repeater sites 
around the world. Only Mark 4 gives you 
Message MasterTM real speech • voice 
readout of received signal strength, 
deviation, and frequency error • 4- 
channel receiver voting • clock time 
announcements and function control * 7- 
helical filter receiver • extensive phone 
patch functions, Unlike others, Mark 4 
even includes power supply and a 
handsome cabinet. 

Call or write for specifications on the 
repeater, controller, and receiver winners. 



Phone: #(508) 372-3442 
FAX: 0(508) 373-7304 




Create messages just by talking. Speak any ph rases or 
words in any languages or dialect and your own voice 
is stored instantly in solid-state memory. Perfect for 
emergency warnings, club news bulletins, and DX 
alerts. Create unique ID and tail messages, and the 
ultimate in a real speech user mailbox — only with a 
Mark 4, 



MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 



Division of Kendecom Inc. 

23 Elm Park, Groveland, MA 01834 




2 meters 220 440 



CIRCLE 144 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 81 



tffc 



ws! 



**! 



o* 



^' 



*6 



eft 



co; 



**J 




*0^>^ NO TUNERS 

NORADIALS 

NO RESISTORS 

NO COMPROMISE 

SIX EXCELLENT REVIEWS JUST 

DONT HAPPEN BY CHANCE 
CALL US FOR A FREE CATALOG. 

tnOci tj, m* 



Sep I T 3, IMS 
Uv W ft. 91 






BILAL COMPANY 

137 Manchester Drive 

Florissant, Colorado &0G16 

[719)687-0650 




w^tM-Cfl-a 



CIRCLE 42 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ATTENTION RAMSEY FX OWNERS 




Want to expand the features of your FX kit? 
The RC series of controllers from MICROTEK will 
do just that. With features such as: 

■ 7 seg LED [JiH.pl a v 

* 12 bun on keypaD 

■ Set rplr offsets wrth ptisn ol a button 

* ?0 channel memory 

* Fast scanning (1 DOma'cham^i) ol all 
Irequencies m memory 

* Call or wile f oi more delays 

flC2 tor the FX146 -RC6 for the FX50 
-RC220 and RC440 coming soon 

And orty 51 1 *S4 snipping and handling 
Va naKfenrs dan Ifcvgrt bxfi^AuhitB. 

MICROTEK 

RR 3 Bo* 4361'Bumpass, Va. 23024 
540-872-7020 



CIRCLE 345 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




and 

J.R.S. DISTRIBUTORS INC, 

A FULL LINE OF HAM RADIO 
EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES 





FT-900AT 



FT-11R 



FT-51R 




FT-2200 




FT-8500 



STORE HOURS: 

TUWED,TH r &FFM1T0 6 

SATURDAY 9 TO 2 

CLOSED SUNDAY AND MONDAY 



J.R.S. DISTRIBUTORS INC. 

646 W. MARKET STREET 

YORK, PA 1 7404 

717.854-8624 



MAIL ORDERS WELCOME 

1-800-JRS-HAM1 

(577-426 1 ) 




Today's No~TunB 
Muttfband Antenna 



* 



TNT b No-Ttuie on SO cw, 40, X. 17. }Z JCL TWTfl is N*-tmie a A 
40.iOi.lOL W>rk osfcer fr ■■<■ «tf inn, DX &G*ib rU* » f ' fKsjuet^ 



R«nh t*U« 



<S99ftRGfa 

JntWtiOaBTl COiB-JCB 

r^rxiOK of,** elastic 
TccIsok 126— S&95 wJ 
Bw 50QK5, Pro™ tJT&Ki© 



WxScmlcJ 

L- V N ;><• 




No Iraps or Ketiktofi 
Jualiicd 1a 3O00V 
Rita] 500 Wins 

Vj? it. loa£ 

*' 800-926-7373 






PIN 



CIRCL£ J3S ON READEH SERVICE CARD 



CB-TO-10 METERS 



We specialize in CB radio modification 
plans and hardware. Frequency and FM 
conversion kits, repair books, plans, high- 
performance accessories. Thousands of 
satisfied customers since 1976! Catalog $3. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL 

LOU FRANKLIN/K6NH Owner 
P O BOX 31500X. PHOENIX, A2 85046 



Sell your products in 

73 Amateur Radio Today* 

Call 1-800-274-7373 
to place your ad. 




SAMPLE 
COPY! 

ANTIQUE RADIO CLASSIFIED 

Antique Radio's Largest-Circulation 

Monthly Magazine 

Articles - Classifieds • Ads for Parts & Services 

Also: Early TV, Ham Equip., Books, 

Telegraph, 40's & 50's Radios & more... 

Free 20-word ad each month. Don't miss out! 

1 -Year: $34.95 {$51 .95 by 1 st Class) 
6-Month Triat - S17.95. Foreign - Write. 

A.R.C., P.O. Box B02-E10, Carlisle, MA 01741 

Or Call: (503) 371-0512 



VISA 



" 



C5 " "^ 



WANT TO LEARN CODE? 



Morse Tutor Gold from G.GXF- is the 

answer for beginners and experts alike. 
*Gct the software I ho ARRL sells and uses to create 
practice and test tapes; and Morse Tutor Gold is 

approved for VE exams at ail I eve Is. 

*Smee I W^ T GGTE ha* guided nearly 20,000 hams mi prrcpectiv* 
bun Hoopd the world through proven structured lesio ns and a 
vansft of character , wot d and conversion doOs Straight tbcwaf d 
menus make the pr oca* simple and Fun 

"This inoffdin feature* easy and speedy seir installation, random 
character dnlk with the characters you select, and you can create 
your own drills or import Text files You can type what you hear of 
copy by hand and see the results one line al a rime Pick the 
Famswortii or Uie sUmUrd method . select the lone frequency most 
com fortiblif Tor you or »eket y flur code speed in tenlluj o E "a word per 
minute. For all DOS computers You are always m command 

Certified 

by Mar te T uior Cold uses your internal speaker 

or sound board And. i f you use a sound board 
Mora* Tutor Gold supports volume control 

Sound hLster and the Sound Blaster Coinpatibility 
Loco are Erode murks tirCrealive Tiidmologv Ltd 



toaihibk ibm dflakrs. thi \RKL.or vtnd $8SS 

M ^AH (C \ itviriLiit'i add S2J2 tax] h>: 
GGTE, l't> Boa 340& (HpLMS, t^wpoil Bcadt, 

t \ M:ft5» s ( Mfif> 5 / J or 3 i 2 inch disk, 





CIRCLE 1M ON REAPER SERVKTE C*ttD 



ASTRON power supply, brand-new w/war- 
ranty, RS20M $95 f RS35M $139, RS50M 
$199, Call for other models. 818-286-0118. 

BNB411 

MAHLON LOOIAiS, INVENTOR OF RADIO; 

by Thomas Appleby, (Copyright 1 &67). Sec- 
ond printing available from JOHAN K.V. 
SVANHOLM, N3RF, SVANHOLM RE- 
SEARCH LABORATORIES, P.O.Box 81, 
Washington DC 20O44. Please send $25.00 
donation with S5.00 for S&K BNB420 

Butternut Antennas New in box. 1 hf2v 
$140 < 1 hf5b $200. Also 1 prop-pitch rotator 
$200 {210)435-6190. BNB435 

ORZI Callsign Database on CD-ROM 
$21.95111 Over 935,000 callsigns, thousands 
of ham programs, mods, etc. Runs on OS/2, 
WINDOWS, DOS, and UNIX.To order call 
1-800-260-8860, 1-909-517-1100, or fax (24 
hrs) 1-909-517-1105. Rom-Dezvous Multi- 
media, 3811 Schaefer Ave. Suile 1, Chino, 
CA, 91710. S&H $5.95. Visa, MC, Disc, 
Amex. personal checks. BNB440 

HAMS-NEED COMPUTER RIBBONS? 

Lowest prices. Color or black. State your 
needs. Free info. HARCLY(I), P.O.Box630A T 
Coquille, OR 97423. BNB457 

CANADIAN QSL's $1.00 Brings samples. 
VE7FI 18610~62nd Avenue, Surrey, B.C., 
V3S 7P1 . BNB475 

WHY RISK FAILURES With Aerial Sup- 
ports? Dacron rope n high UV resistant, non- 
stretch Military Type black DOUBLE (unlike 
our competitors' single) braided. 1-800-328- 

4773. BNB557 

SATELLITE EQUIPMENT Best $$$ USA. 
(800)851-6534. BNB640 

For Sale Computer 286AT, 60MB, 3.1 MS- 
DOS, Printer, Software, Modem, (21 2-942- 

6963). BNB695 

Surplus electronic test equipment for sale 
at deep discounts. Write, phone, or fax to re- 
quest the current list Jim Stevenson, 3401 
Sunny Slope Rd T Bridgewater. NJ 08807 
Phone: (908)722-6157 Fax: (908)722-6391. 

BNB705 

ELECTRON TUBES: All types and sizes. 
Transmitting, receiving, microwave . . . 
Large inventory = same day shipping, 
DAILY ELECTRONICS, 10914 NE 39th St. 
Suite B-6, Vancouver, WA 98682. (800)346- 
6667 or (360)896-8856. BNB71 9 

Ham & Two-Way Radio Repair Prompt ser- 
vice, competitive prices, Centurion Commu- 
nications.892 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland NJ 
08360 (609)794-8000 Fax (609)794-8989, 

BNB750 

HAM RADIO REPAIR-Prompt service. 
ROBERT HALL ELECTRONICS, 1660 Mc- 
Kee Rd>, Suite A, San Jose CA 95116. 
(408)729-8200. BNB751 



82 73 Amateur Radio Today • October, 1 995 



WANTED; HAM EQUIPMENT AND RELAT- 
ED ITEMS. Donate your excess gear, new- 
o!d*in-any-conditbn to the Radio Club of Ju- 
nior High School 22, the nations only full- 
time, nonprofit organization working to get 
ham radio into schools around the country 
as a teaching tool using our EDUCOM--Edu- 
catlon Thru Communication-program. Send 
your radio to school. Your donated material 
will be picked up ANYWHERE or shipping 
arranged, and this means a tax deduction to 
the full extent of the law for you as we are 
an IRS 501(c)(3) charity in our 15th year of 
service. It es always easier to donate and 
usually more financially rewarding, BUT 
MOST IMPORTANT your gift will mean a 
whole new world of educational opportunity 
for children nationwide. Radios you can 
write off r kids you can't. Make 1995 the year 
to help a child and yourself. Write, phone or 
FAX the WB2JKJ "22 Crew" today: The RC 
of JHS 22, P.O. Box 1052, New York NY 
10002. 24 hours call {516)674-4072 or FAX 
(516)674-9600. Join us on the WB2JKJ 
CLASSROOM NET, 7.238 MHz 1200-1330 
UTC daily and 21.395 MHz from 1400 to 
2000 UTC. Meet us at Beachfest 95 on 
November 1 1 tn Myrtle Beach SC sponsored 
by the Grand Strand ARC. BN8762 

SERIOUS ABOUT SOLAR POWER? The 

PVSP starter kit comes with a 32 watt 
Solarex VLX panel and a ten amp Sunlogic 
charge controller. Special introductory price 
$275 plus $7 shipping, SUNLIGHT ENER- 
GY SYSTEMS, 2225 Mayflower NW t Massil- 
lon OH 44647, BNB774 

Amateur Radio T-Shirts & Sweat Shirts, 
Electonics Books. Send for catolog Paul 
Washa 4916 Three Points Blvd. Mound, MN. 
55364-1245. BNB805 

R-39GA SALES & SERVICE. Info SASE: 
MILTRONIX, RO, Box 80041, Toledo OH 
43608. BNB813a 

R-390 Power Input Cables $25 Shipped, 
(419)255-6220. BNB813b 

Morse Code Computer Interfaces $49.95, 
CW Filters $39.95. Free IBM Shareware and 
Ham Catolog. Dynamic Eletronics, Box 
896, Hartselle, AL 35640, (205)773-2758 
Fax 773-7295. BNB815 

FCC COMMERCIAL LICENSE PREPARA- 
TION RADIOTELEPHONE-RADIOTELE- 
GRAPH GMDSS. Latest home study fast 
easy audio video, Q & A pool disks. FREE 
details WPT PUBLICATIONS (800)800- 
7588. BNB840 

ELECTRONICS GRAB BAG! 500 pieces of 
new components: inductors, capacitors, 
diodes, resistors, $5.00 postpaid. ALL- 
TRONICS, 2300 Zanker Rd., San Jose CA 
95131. BNB855 

BEST OFFER FOR; KRONE-HITE WIDE 
BAND AMP MODEL DCA-50(R) S DENTRON 
AMP GLA 1000 1200 WATT, TEN-TEE 
TRANSCIEVER MODEL 540, DAIWA SWR 
& POWER METER MODEL CN-620. 
PHONE/FAX 91 4-234-7763, BNB900 



YOUR ICOM IC-75 L 

IC-745 and R71 

CAN FAIL! 

UNLESS YOU OWN THE WILLCO ICM1024 

NO FAIL RAM WITH 1024 MEMORIES 

AND EXTENDED FREQUENCY LIMITS, 

TIME IS RUNNING OUT. 



/"¥\ 


o 


P-JN 





v%f J 


o 


vL/ 


o 



WIIJ.OO Electronics 
P.O. Box 788 
New Lien ox + IL 
U.S.A. 60451 

PH {U5) 7234874 FAX (815) 723-1436 
Internet; willco7HS@,3oLc«m 



CIRCLE 388 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Tin*'" 



'OVER A MILLION CUL SIGNS 
' ONLINE™ IJ.S.lNTEKrVATIPWAL CM I NIRKCTORY 



?\ 



Hamcall online service gives you access to 
over a million hams via your computer & 
modem. Updated each month! Only $29.95 
per year. Unlimited use - 24 hours a day - 
vou pay for the phone call. 

p-^cJ Roule 4. Bo* 1 S3D - Mineral, Virgiina 231 17 
* * ■ Internet mrargfcujck.Qom 



CIRCLE 7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




SPY ON THE EARTH 

See five on 

your PC 

what 

satellites fn 
orbit see 

Capture live breathtaking images of trie Earth for fun or 
profit with our Spy Sat software and hardware package that 
does it all Track, capture, display, zoom and analyze 
images directly from 6 or more environmental satellites. 
Complete Earth station package includes antenna, LNA, 
satellite receiver* demodulator, A-D converter and software, 
all for only $399 plus $25 shipping. For FREE information 
log-on to our bulletin board anytime at: (71 8 J 740-3911, For 
information by mail send $5 (includes demo disk). 

VANGUARD Electronic Labs 

Dept. A, 196-23 Jamaica Ave. 

HoliiS, NY 11423 Tei.71 8-468-2720 





There are no small 

victories in the fight 

against heart disease. 

American Heart Association 

£ 1992. American Heart Association 




$1295* 

m iForZDay 
^W Delivery 

'Up to 12 Ita. in Continental USA 



UVlLifterGartll 



1-800-426-2891 



Internet 

http://www.radioinc.Gonn 



! jgjj tfl^QW J 

pjfiis W*** 
SpeaKPtpnws 



»**■»** 



.^ttSfr. 



ICOM 



s- 




.;,■?;!' 
IC-73B 

f-C-rCc 

It 42! 
tttflll 
ICJ3* 

[C-2GXA1- 

lC-TflA 

iC-T22A 

it-W:i^ 

IC-21A 



Ft 
t| 



Look for 

October 




H 

3rn. mQ\ 



C 
MS 00 



Cfll % 

tn.it 

(.».. \ 

t*LU 
Out 
CALL! 
MLU 
CflU* 
CALL* 

D*U t 

GALt t 
CflLt 1 

call i 

CALL* 



'Itau iemwJiii ncn teen ioprt^id ty «H+ tttitm C^ftmufticifififli Co-mnwmofi Thu: 
famtt i: noi HU p*> fiii it. tfkreS lor -*b\e sr \txt or -aoii nr itntt unlr ifir 
i?P'c-vil fli ihfui. mi bttn ebriirw? 



KENWOOD 



:ov?si7 




rsis&tf 

FS-lSc5« 

rsm 

fy.;jii 
m 

tM-790A H 

FH"*22'*t 

TH HA(Dl 
fHZSA 



LQw oo 

2 m 2 i* B5C i K 



W*¥^ 




FT-1BD0 

FMOHD 

■'■-tf. 

f T-T3-6ft 
FT-2 

FT-22M 
FT25 
FT'&IM 
FT-*SM 

FT-5- T FU3l 
FT-iJG 



Yaesu Day 

October 7, 1995 



at 




so* a-a 



CALL | 

CALL! 
CALL t 

CALL 

:all 

CALL 
'Chi 
tALL 
CALL 
CALL 

;^ll 

CdLL 



Radio City, Inc. 

2663 Counly fiaad I, Mounds View, MN 55112 

Man Watts: 1-800-426-2B91 

Metro; 1612)786-447.5 »FAX: (612)736-6513 

Store Hours: M-f. 1 : D am -7:3D pm. Sal.: 1Q'D0 am-S.OO pni 
Phone Hours: r:VF, 9,00 ani-730 pm. Sal.: 1d:0D am-S:GD fini 



CALL FOR 

CATALOG 

Ask for 

Ext. 11 



Expires 

October 
1-305 




Met Responsible for Typographical Errors, 
prices Subject To Charge Wilhoul Noiice 



CIRCLE 153 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 83 



K3 



era 



O 



FOH 
HAMS 
OHLY 




ROBB KE3EE 
Jehry K3FKI 
Dave KA3ZNV 



■JPWWWWPWP 



4309 Northern Pike Blvd. MonrDeviHe, PA 15146 

{412)374-9744 
FOR ORDERS ONL Y CALL (800)854-081 5 

Specializing in Preowned 
Amateur and Shortwave Equipment 
Buy * Sell • Repair * Love To Trade 

We Carry All Major Brands of New Equipment 
We Now Custom Design & Build Computers 

For HAMs by HAMs 

All of The Latest Hardware & Software 

Call For Details 



t&.h 



*&■ 



H 



Quality Microwave TV Systems 



WIRELESS CABLE - ITFS - MMDS 
jATV - INTERNATIONAL - SB AND 

I Amplifiers ■ Antenna? ■ Books * Components 
Filters * Systems; * Video Products 

• RF Frequency 1990 - S?00 MHz 

• Cable Ready - VHP - UHF Outputs 

• SASE For "FREE" Catalog of Send $1 

PHILLIPS-TECH ELECTRONICS 

PO Box B533 



Scottsdale, AZ B5252 
challenge system ORDER LINE 0OG-88O-MMDS 

602-947-7700 
602-947-7799 

Visa * Mi/C * Amx « Dfsc * COD's * Qty Pricing 



&Cfa*MI«J 52t)E« Gain A nTA , Ar { lum 
»iet e FAX LINE 



Complete Grid $265 
Five Year Warranty 
FREE SHIPPING 



CIRCLE 249 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 329 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ULTIMATE MODIFICATION BIBLE VOL IV 

NEW AND MORE COMPLETEIll 

OVEH 600 MIK£ WIRING C00€S FOR CB M0 HAW RACHQ& 
OVER 40Q C& FOweft.WQDULATiGrt r£05T INSTRUCTIONS 
OVER ^00 -MOO. FCfl CB PlL'S 
OVER 175 MOO. FCA HAM RA DOS 

OVER » COUPLETE SYNTNES2E0 CflYSTAl CHARTS 

WTH INSTRUCTIONS, 
OVER 25 SCANIVE fl UOQ. AMD TEN UFTER RAflO MOO 
OVER 20 PREC A LCUUT^D MOO. CRYSTAL CHARTS, 
LWE R SCHEMATIC 5 AW ANTJCOAX * GAJNUOSS CHARTS 

KDC SOUND 

17294 FM3QK3 ChrtnOi*: J-BQO-256-9895 

ConfD&.TX 77302 All &f*c*ii:40&- 23 1-3753 



4 QUDUTT V 




_...r 



$29,95 



MONGVORKFL COO 

ucc^sc/visAoncK 



CIRCLE 151 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAY TV AND SATELLITE DESCRAMBLING 

All New Info 1936 Edition * Vol. 7 Our Best Yet 



Pay TV and Satellite Descrambling Volumes 1 -7 (all different} 
Satellite and DBS Hacking. Wireless ancf Cable Hacking, 
Compleat Wizard, Buying Surplus Seized and Distressed Goods, 
Cellular Phone Hacking, Computer and Phone Hacking, New 
Hacker Video. $15.^ each, 3^34-^ or 5/652,^ American 
Hacker Magazine $29 .35 includes BBS. Our Be$l Deal only 
S129J£ includes even/thing here and lots more. New catalog $1 



SCRAMBLING NEWS 

3494 Delaware Ave. #123, Buffalo, NY 14217-1230 
Voice/FAX 716 87^2088 BBS 71 6 871-191 5 dlowsonOloc^ net 



CIRCLE 36 ON READER SERVICE CARD 





Range Extender for 
2 meter KandheEds 

■ Boosts Signal from Flair 
£ 1 -4 wav& Antennas 

- L&i'afs Radtatic^ Angle 
« Improves both Receive 

and T/ansm rf 
* Rai&aa L.ow Pp**f 

PaffQfTna-nc* 

■ Saves your aartary Pbck 
Order ft&ttm 

■600-*26-73'73, 

\ <> See and Hear the Difference \ (— 



my to Use 
- Unobtrusfve 
■ EasiEy Concealed 

• Snap* an Handhfilci 

* Weighs onty 1.3 oz. 

* Adds Mo Bufk or Height 



Atttemta&West 

Sai ift«2.3L Pniva. LTT A4j3iS3 ^ , 



CIRCLE 107 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



To sell your products in 73 Amateur Radio Today > 
Call (800) 274-7373 today to place your ad. 




A NO-RADIAL VERTICAL 
THAT COVERS 80 OR 75 METERS? 

THERE'S ONE NOW! 

No T we won't insult your intelligence by telling you that it's a 
"halfwave" or that ANY vertical will operate more efficiently without a 
good radial system than with one; it certainly won't! If you want 
expensive fairy tales talk to our competitors! If, however, you've no 
room for even the smallest radial system just install the most efficient 
multiband vertical in the business, the HF9V-X, over our counterpoise 
kit. You'll not onty save a tidy sum but you'll work DX that the shorter 
and more lossy no-radial "halfwaves" can't touch because both the 
HF6V-X and HF9V-X use longer active element lengths for higher 
radiation resistance and greater efficiency on more bands than any of 
the so-called halfwaves. Ask for our free brochure for complete specs 
on all Butternut models and receive technical note DLS-1 "Dirty Little 
Secrets from the Antenna Designer's Notebook") that shows you how 
to calculate the probable efficiency of any vertical antenna using the 
manufacturer's own specs so you won't have to learn the truth the 
hard way! 



Model HF9V-X (shown to the left) for 80/75, 40, 30, 20, 
17, 15, 12, 10 and 6 meters. 



Model CPX counterpoise kit for Butternut models 
HF9V-X, HF6V, and HF6V-X; substitutes for ground or 
elevated radials. Self-supporting tubing bolts onto 
base of antenna. Mast not provided. 

BUTTERNUT ANTENNAS from BENCHER INC. 

831 N. Central Av. * Wood Dale, II 60191 • 708-238-1183 




HANDSOME AWARD CERTIFICATES FOR 
DX ACCOMPLISHMENTS. FOR INFO 
SEND S.A.S.E TO NOPZA 1801 CIMAR- 
RON TRL CHOCTAW, OK 73020, BNB905 

HEATHKIT WANTED! S.B. Series 'Green 
Front 8 for parts, Robert Schlegel 2302 
286th St. East, Roy WA 98580. BNB91 

WANTED: BUY AND SELL All types of 
Electron Tubes. Call (612)429-9397, Fax 
(612)429-0292. C & U ELECTRONICS, 

Harold Bramstedt, 6104 Egg Lake Road, 
Hugo MN 55038, BNB91 5 

Capacitor Close-out Retiring HamFest 
Scene. Must Sell thousands of brand new 
capacitors. Electrolytic, Disc, Tantalum, All 
must go! Free Listing. Send SASE to; 
James Grogan, Box 20809, Raleigh NC 
27619. BNB945 

RF TRANSISTORS, Japanese transistors 
and tubes need dealers, repair shops, kit 
makers, etc. for 2SC1969, 2SC2312, 
MB8719, MRF455, MRF454, 2SC2879 and 
more. WESTGATE (800)213-4563. BNB950 

FREE HAM GOSPEL TRACTS, SASE. 
N3FTT, 5133 Gramercy, Clifton Heights PA 
19018. BNB960 

HEATH COMPANY is selling photocopies of 
most Heathkit manuals. Only authorized 
source for copyright manuals. Phone (61 6) 
925-5899, 8-4 EX BNB964 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects in 
73, Ham Radio, QST, ARRL Handbook. List 
SASE. FAR CIRCUITS, 18N640 Field Ct., 
Dundee IL 60118. BNB966 

AZDEN SERVICE by former factory techni- 
cian. SOUTHERN TECHNOLOGIES AMA- 
TEUR RADIO INC., 10715 SW 190 St. #9, 

Miami FL 33157. {305} 238-3327. BNB979 

ROTOR PARTS ROTOR SERVICE, ROTOR 
accessories: Brak-D-Lays, Quik-Connects, 
Pre-Set mods. NEW models for sale. Free 
catalog. CA.T-S-, 7368 State Road 105, 
Pembervitle OH 43450, BNB996 

SECRET CB BOOKS 1-29 $10 ea., SAMS 
books $16 ea. Tune up masters books 1-6 
$20 ea., Uniden export sen/ice manual $10, 
RCl 2950/2970 service manual $10. Calf for 
free catalog of other goodies. 1-800-536- 
0109. BNB999 

Wanted for Museum: Apple-1 and other 
pre-1980 microcomputers, Also early micro- 
computer journals, newsletters and advertis- 
ing literature. KK4WW, 703-231-6478/763- 

BNB1001 



CODE 5 News and Petition information. 
SASE to KB7PNQ, 503 Dubois Atreet, 
Cheney, WA 99004. BNB1 01 2 

AMATEUR RADIO REPAIR, most makes 
and models t discount labor rates until June 
1995. WESTERN AMATEUR RADIO RE- 
PAIR CO., John Rupe, Box 697, North 
Cove, WA 98547; (360) 267-4011. Thanks, 
AB7DR. BNB1015 



84 73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 



jflfc Number 26 on yoi 

Special events 



your Feedback card 



Ham Doings Around the World 



Listings are free of charge as space permits. Please send us your Special Event 
two months in advance of the issue you want it to appear in. For example, if you 

want it to appear in the April issue, we should receive it by January 31. 
Provide a clear, concise summary of the essential details about your Special Event 



OCT 21 

GRANDV1EW, MO The Southside ARC 
wifl hold their J, Ocioberfesf at Grand view 
East Jr. H.S., 12650 Manchester VE Ex- 
ams. Tafk-in on 147,120, Contact KGOUP, 
P.O. Box 1142, Grandview MO 64030. 

GRAY, TN The 15th annual Tri-Cilies 
Manifest will be held at the Appalachian 
Fair Grounds, located off 1-181 in Gray 
TN. Drive-in indoor/Outdoor Flea Market. 

Mail inquiries to Tri -Cities Hamfest, P.O. 
Box 3682 CRS, Johnson City TN 37602 
Sponsored by the Kingsport, Bristol, and 
Johnson City Radio Clubs. 

HOLLAND, Ml The Holland ARC will 
host a Hamfest at Holland Christian H.S. S 
950 Ottawa Ave. 8 AM-1 PM. VE Exams. 
Talk-in on 147.0GQ(+) pf 94,8. Contact 
Barbara Siebefink N8NXA r 6418 Otis Rd. r 
Saugaiuck Mi 49453. Tel. (616) 857- 
1343, or Fax (616) 857-1463. 

MEDFORD, OR The Rogue Valley ARC 
will hold a Swap meet at the Medford Ar- 
mory, 1701 South Pacific Hwy., 9 AM-4 
PM. Setup at 7 AM, Computers. Radio 
Gear. VE Exams, pre-reg. and waik-in; 
contact Paul Miller KE7VQ, Box 555, 
Shady Cove OR 97539. Tel. {503} 878- 
3433. Make check payable to RVARC, 
1707 East Main St., Medford OR 97504. 
Your name tag and entry tickets will bo at 
the entrance door. South of Medford, talk- 
in on 147.160 Rptr. North of Medford, 
talk-in on 146.940 Rptr. 

SALEM, OR The Mid-Vaifey ARES will 
present the 1995 "Swap-toberfesf and 
ARES/RACES Convention at the Polk 
County Fairgrounds in Rickreal OR. Time: 
9 AM*4 PM. Swap table setup 6 PM-9 PM 
Fri., Oct. 20th, and 7 AM Sat. Talk-in on 
the 146.86 Rptr Flea Market. Dealers. VE 
Exams h pre-reg. required; contact Sandy 
Berry N7TQQ t (503) 588-7685. To re- 
serve swap tables, contact Evan Bur- 
roughs N7IFJ, (503) 585-5924 Commer- 
cial and Specialty Dealers, call Garry Zinn 
KC7BSX, (503) 378*3702 

SENECA, PA The Ft, Venango Mike & 

Key Club Ham Radio Auction and Flea 
Market will be heid at the Christian Life 
Building. Rte. 257 between Rte. 322 and 
Rte. 62. All activities will be held in the 
gymnasium and cafeteria. Auction Hems 
are cash only! Doors open at S AM; the 
auction begins at 10 AM. Talk-fn on 
147. 12(+), 145.23(0, 145. 19(-) and 
444.125(+). To reserve Flea Market 
space, caJI Mary Houshofder N3QCR, 
(814) 437-2036; e-mail address: MA- 
HOUSHOLD@AOL.COM; or write to Fort 
Venango Mike & Key Club, HM #i, P.O. 
Box59t f Cranberry PA 16319. 

SUMTER, SC The Sumter ARA Ham- 
f est/Computer Fair will be held 8 AM-4 
PM at the Sumter County Exhibition Cen- 
ter, 700 W. Liberty St. Deaier and Flea 
Market setup Fri., 4 PM-9 PM; Sat, 6 AM. 
VE Exams will begin at approx. 10 AM, 
walk-ins only. Call for more info. Talk- in 
on 147.015(+). Dealers call Tommy Du- 
bose KB4CH (803) 469-5093. For Flea 
Market tables, camping/tailgating and 
general info , call Mike Dunlap KC4HUT, 
(803)481-4611. 

OCT 21-2Z 

WEST PALM BEACH, FL The Palm 
Beach Rptr. Assn, tnc. will host the Palm 
Beach County Hamfest Amateur 



Radio/Computer Show at the South Fiorn 

da Fairgrounds. Southern Blvd., in West 
Palm Beach. Gates open Sat., 9 AM-5 
PM; Sun., 9 AM-3 PM. VE Exams both 
days, on site, at 9 AM Vendors, call Hal 

Gainen, (407) 439-0805. To reserve FFea 
Market tables, calf Vi Kiekenapp, (407) 
585-9074. Full RV hookup ■ 1-800-527- 
3247 Talk-in on 147.1 65/765. 

OCT 22 

SELLERSVILLE, PA The RH Hill ARC 
will hold a Hamfest at Sellersviile Fire 
House, Rte. 152 r 5 miles South of Quak- 
ertown and 8 mi. North of MonV 
gomeryville. Talk-in on 145.31 . VE Exams 
start at 9 AM, all classes. Bring docu- 
ments. Contact Linda Erdman KA3TJZ, 
P.O. Box 29, Colmar PA 18915. Tel. (215) 
679-5764. 

WARREN, Ml The Utica Shelby Emer- 
gency Comm. Assn., Inc. will hoid their 
"USECA Swap 13 at Our Lady of Redemp- 
tion Conference Center 425 Coie, in War- 
ren. Ham gear, electronics, computers, 
software. VE Exams, pre-reg. required; 
call 0/// N8CVC, (810) 468-8345. Non- 
ham gift items will also be featured Con- 
tact Chairman Kevin Everett N8QVX, 
21947 Birch wood, Eastpoint Mi 48021; 
Tel. ($10) 772-8082: or call Jim N8QKW 
or Marianne N8TMJ, (810) 739-6565; or 
Biff N8NQQ, (810) 566-7743. Talk-in on 
147.18(+) (100 Hz tone), and 147.42 sim- 
plex. 

OCT 28 

CONNECTICUT The annual Ham Radio 
Auction sponsored by Tri City ARC will be 

held at the Senior Citizens Center, Water- 
ford Municipal Complex, from 10 AM until 
sold out, Bring your equipment to be auc- 
tioned. TaJk-in on 1 46 .37/. 97 Rptr. For info 

call KA IBB at (203) 739-8016. 

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL Port St. Lucie ARA 
will present "Hamfest- 95 1 ' 0800-1500 
hours at the Port St. Lucie Yacht Club r 
500 Prima Vista Blvd, Talk-in on 
146.955/R; alternate 146.520 simplex. 
For details, call Bill Perciasepe, (407) 
879-4020; or Roy Cox, (407) 340-4319. 

ST. LOUIS, MO The 4th annual Hal- 
loween Hamfest, sponsored by the Gate- 
way to Ham Radio Club and the St Louis 
ARC, will be heid from 8:30 AM-2 PM at 
West County Technical H.S. r Hwy. 401-64 
and Maryville Centre Dr., 8 mi. W of St. 
Louis. Talk-sn on 147.34/. 94. Commercial 
vendors, forums, VE Exams. For info on 
tables, tickets, call or write Keith Ray 
NOKFE, 4642 Ray Ave., St. Louis MO 
63116; Tet. (314) 832-8895. 

ST PAUL, MN The 11th Hamfest Min- 
nesota and Computer Expo, sponsored 
by the Twin Cities FM Club, will be hold 8 
AM-4 PM in the main arena at the St. 
Paul Civic Center, Kellogg and West 7th 
St Flea Market, educational and fun sem- 
inars, and more. VE Exams administered 
Fri. at 6 PM by SL Paul Radio Club VE 
Team. Flea Market setup Fri. night. For in- 
fo and advance reg. call (612) 535-0637; 
or write P.O. Box 5598 t Hopkins MN 
55343. Talk-in on 146.16A7G Rptr. 

OCT 29 

OES NIOiNES, IA 'Hamfest lowaW will 
be sponsored by the Tikva Tracers ARC 
in the 4H Building at Iowa State Fair- 
grounds, Setup Sat., 6 PM-9 PM; Sun., 6 



AM. VE Exams at 9:30 AM. Talk-In on 
146.22/82. Contact Randai Lees NOLMS, 

1575 Northwest 78th St., Clive IA 50325- 
1255 Tei. (515)279-4241. 

LINDENHURSI NY The Suffolk County 
RC and The Great South Bay RC will hold 
their AARL approved Long island Ham- 
fest/Computer Show 9 AM-4 PM at the 
Knights of Columbus Hall, 400 South 
Broadway, Talk-in on WB2FKZ Rptr. r 
146.685 (pi 4Z - 136.5 Hz) and 223.86 
{Open Carrier). Call for info 7 PM-10 PM, 
Andy Fetdman WB2FXN, (516) 928-3868; 
or Watt Wenzei KA2RGI, (516) 957-0218. 

NEWTOWN, PA The Penn Wireless 
Assn. Ham/Computer Tracfefest will be 
held 8 AM-4 PM at Bucks County Comm. 
College, next to Tyler State Park, on 
Swamp Rd. VE Exams 10 AM; call (215) 
943-4886. Talk-in on 145.250 pJ 131.8, or 
146.520 simplex. For details, call Steve, 
(215)752-1202, 

SOUTHWICK, MA The Hampden County 

Radio Assn. will present its annual Ha in- 
fest/Electronics Show at the Soutwick 
Rec. Center, Powder Mill Rd., just off Rte. 
57. Setup at 6 AM. Open to the public at 9 
AM, VE Exams r pre-reg. required; contact 
Yorke Phillips K1BXE, (413) 566-3010. 
For reservations and info, contact Barry 
Mason N1IJK t (413) 747-7010 before 10 
PM: or John Walker N1QXV, (413) 572- 
4592 before 9 PM. Or write to Hamfest 
Committee, 36 Kenwood Terrace, Spring- 
field MA 01108-1716. 

WESTMINSTER, MD The 6th annual 
Mason -Dixon Computer/Hamfest will be 
co- sponsored by the Carroll County and 
Penn-Mar ARCs., at the Carrol! County 
Ag Center. Seminars will be presented. 6 
AM Vendor and Ta I [gating; 8 AM General 
Admission. VE Exam reg. begins at 8 AM; 
pre-reg. requested. Cafi Bill Wolfgang 
NZ3J, (717) 359-7095 Tafk-in on 145.41 
MHz. For general info, contact Larry Mar- 
tin N3DGK, (410) 374-4544. 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 

OCT 7-8 

LAKE STEVENS, WA and WICHITA 
FALLS, TX The 5th annual Missionfest 
will be on the air seeking to talk wilh and 
encourage Christian missionaries 
throughout the world. Co sponsored by 
Christ Lutheran of Wichita Falls TX, and 
Elim Lutheran of Lake Stevens WA, HF 
operations will be from 1500 UTC-0600 
UTC Sat,, and again from 1900 UTC- 
0100 UTC on Sun! Freq.: 28.420, 2t.420 h 
14.278 and 7.278 MHz. Join in with 
prayer requests, and visit with foreign 
missionaries worldwide! Calisigns N5JRF 
(Wichita Falls), and N5UJA (Lake 
Stevens). Call (206) 334-2540 for more 
info, 

PITTSBURG, PA The Breezeshooters 

ARC wili operate W3XX from the subma- 
rine USS Requin, 1400Z-2100Z Oct- 7-8, 
to celebrate the Centennial of the 
Carnegie Science Center. The Requin is 
docked at the Carnegie Science Center, 
Operation will be on vintage CW equip., in 
the lower half of the Novice subbands. 
Phone operation will be in the General 
class segment of 20m and 40m. For a 
certificate and QSL card, send QSL and 
an 8 1/2" % 11" SASE to Ron Berry 
WB3LHD, 326 Sunset Dr. t Bethel Park PA 
15102. 



OCT 11-15 

CINCINNATI, OH Radio amateurs in the 
tri-state area around Cincinnati will oper- 
ate SE Stations using fTS suffix, as part 
of the 1995 Tall Stacks cetebration. Spon- 
soring club calls wiil be K8SCH;TS (OH- 
KY-iN ARS), W8DZ7TS (Greater Cincin- 
nati ARA), and W8VND/TS (Queen City 
Emergency Met). They will operate all 
bands and modes thru 70 cm. Special 
QSLs will be avai fable to the callbook ad- 
dresses; orN8FU SASE, or via bureau for 
any or all of the special calls. Tall Stacks 
recalls the historic and continuing impor- 
tance of river commerce, and wili indude 
19 steam boats. Sponsored by the 
Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visi- 
tors Bureau. 

OCT 13-15 

WISCONSIN To commemorate its 4th 
annual disaster-services seminar, 
SATERN (Salvation Army Team Emer- 
gency Radio Network) wili sponsor Sta- 
tion WW9E. CW and SSB activities are 
planned for the lower portions of the Gen- 
eral and Novice subbands. Digital activi- 
ties are also planned. For QSL. please 
send your card, SASE, and the name of 
the operator worked to NH2Z, Apt #608, 
84 -265 Far ring ton Hwy. f Waianae Hi 
96792; or directly to the operator contact- 
ed. 

OCT 14 

PENSACOLA T FL KF4BHC, The Serious 
Hams ARC, will put EOTA NA-142 from 
Fort Pickens in Santa Rosa Island, on the 
air 1230Z-1800Z. For QSL h send SASE to 
Mike Brown N4MAD, 519 S. Edgewood 
Cir. r Pensacota FL 32506 

OCT 14-15 

RICHMOND, CA ThA East Bay ARC will 

observe the 90th Birthday of the City of 
Richmond by operating W6CUS from club 
headquarters at the Richmond Red Cross 
building. Times: Oct. 14th, 0100-0500 and 
1700-2400 UTC; Oct. 15th, 0000-0400 
and 1700-2400 UTC. General subbands 
on 80, 40 f 20, and 15m; Novice subbands 
on 10m and 2m. For a certificate, send 
QSL and a 9" x 12* SASE to EBARC, 
P.O. Box 1393, El Cerrito CA 94530. 

OCT 21 

CONCORDIA, KS The Kansas-Nebraska 
ARC will operate Station WOIND to com- 
memorate the 50th Anniversary of the 
closing of the German Prisoner of War 
camp near Concordia, The station will op- 
erate 1400 UTC-2000 UTC from the Air- 
port Park during the POW Camp celebra- 
tion. WOIND will operate in the lower 25 
kHz of the General phone portions of 30, 
75, 40 p 20, and 15m r along with packet on 
145X1 MHz. For a QSL certificate, send 
QSL and large SASE to Kansas-Nebras- 
ka ARC, c/o Artan R. Campbell WQNBT, 
Rt 3 Bqx20^A, Concordia KS 66901. 

OCT 21-22 

BOLIVAR, VENEZUELA Station YW6AF 
will operate during a expedition to the top 
of Angel Falls, the world's highest water 

fail; Sat., 000O UTC-2400 UTC Sun. 10, 
20, 40, and 80m bands wiil be used wilh 
SSB ; CW, RTTY and packet The QSL 
card wiil be via YV6AG. Sponsored by the 

Radio Club Venezolano, Chapter Ciudad 
Guayana (YV6AG). 



73 Amateur Radio Today October, 1995 85 



Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf 



REFERENCE 



RS-- The Amateur Radio Mail Order 
Catalog and Resource Directory. 4th 
Edition is the nwsi comprehensive source bock 
fOf due I tonic parts, software, and uuuipinem tar- 
geted at the radiu amateur nr mtuh^ electronic 
hohhyo.1 anywhere! Plu^ a wealth oi 1 " value- 
added Lh reference mate rial ill in 262 page*, 4ih 
l-ditirm clearance at only $8,95. iwas S 16 (Hh 

TAB2701 Transmitter Hunting M Joirph 
Modi tmd Thomm Curkr Radn> direction finding 
umnbTial S»-f5 

UE202 RTTTf Today m ftnir tof rnm Modern 
to amateur radwtefclype SJL'5 



TPOOT The World Hjjn %« Dimrtury frv JUfr 
WitLw %ii New — 2nd crfrtmn Introduces the spe- 
cial uite res* hjm rodm nrfwurt* ind *bo»> you 
when and uhcrt you can tune them in Sf JO 

WGPB715S 1995 North American Callbook 
Hie t*J5 North AmLTiLjjL C'JH.iorj| Iwis the; calls. 

name*, and addresi informal km for 500,000+ li- 
cenced radio amateurs m nil Wttntrkl of rVordt 
America S350Q 

VMHP4 Radio Handbook, 23rd Ed. by 
Witttmi i. Orr W6SAI R40p,ipe> id everything you 

wanted lo knt>w about rjJir ..nm inn meal ion 
53M5 

WGP1Z34 1995 International Callbook The 
sew 1995 International Csllb^l \nis *OC\l*lk h 
cca*ed radio amateur, in the etmatrict tqitsidc 
Sorrh Amcnc*. It cover* South Ammo. Europe. 
Africa. Asa. and tlw Facitic area tctcin^e Df 
lla* m lad the U S pra*eu**») S35i» 

AR4092 Your BTTY/AMTOfl Companion 
fearilct ynu 10 rlptan in." *OtU I HF Digital 



NEW BOOKS = 

AR442U Introduction to Radio Frequency 
Ik-st^n In thi*. practical honk, the ,iutrMr em- 
phasizes use of mtkJeh ami their application 
lit l*uiii linear and mniiincar circuits, reviews 
irkiitiini.il material stressing I lie viewpoints 
r ; l V. c 1 1 ro ihe kl- desijmet .in. I illustrates Mih 
jecl material hy numeric;! J examples. In- 
cludes J 1/2 inch di*k fof IBM R r Or com- 
patible*. 530.00 

R&D5745U Raptures of the I Jeep by Fred 
Jurneman What ue understand in Gierke to- 
dav. and the challenge^ facing n'^'niki*, in just 
ahout every fiekl An incrcdihte job iff research 
on how and shy scjenim*. NHioc what Lbcy 
do jUmii our work! and how it works. S29J95 

SHORTWAVE = 

NBPAYY£~F 1995 Passport to World 
Band Radio br Iniftnmtnnut Hrm&-<miifg 
Strvkta Ltd You'll get thr tate« mutton and 
itme grid^ Sl*.*5 

07R25 The HTTY Listenar t*\> Frnf Osttr- 
mon Ke.w and eatpofxted lins ipedltijed kx>k. 

cnmpik& issues I through 25 of ilie RTTY 
Unteuvr News tetter. Cunuiitw urHiMl^ie, hard- 
in Hid informaiion or udviinecd RTTY and 
FAX mom tori ng tvcliiiuiiu-^ .nui Irt-'quencies.. 
SI 9.95 

09S4P Tna Scanner Listener's Handbook 
Itv Edward St'Kmit- X2Bt i (Jet the mnv ■ 
vow scanner ndto SI 4.95 

CRBSM1 Scanner Mod If i cation Hand- 
bOCk. Vol, 1 bj Bill Olf* pnn^ks sttat^u- 
hrK-asd sie|vtn-4ti-p in.4meiknu for expanding 
tbe operating capabilities of VIII 7 if W a rrt 
$17.95 

CR3SM2 Scanner Modification Hand- 
book VaL 2 try mil Or* Here i( a— a cum- 
poiinw m VoL L In fact* Vol 2 h» a secoon 
that provides improved jppoHKiH'S jnj updaiiNi 
techmqutfs tor die mods m Vol I Ttieie*s 18 
new excxtiag nuiditicuiions tor popular scan- 
ners. Si 7.95 

TAB 339S43 Tuning In To RF Scanning 
From Police to Satellite Rjitids liuh K:iy l5l)p 



L-nmmunLLations. If you've never operand ftTTY' 
or AMTOK before, this book is wntten rxjHMUii]y 
tur \ i hj 1 Ynu won't find complicated technical 
iarjCfl here. Just tnftsrmation you can use rlgltt 
awn y You'll discover how to Assemble jour 
1 1 w n R 1 " I' Y / A M Til R stM ion Ux RTTY " a nd 
AMTtJk 10 uJk in amateurs dirnucJnmt the world 
. . . CVrmvlc in RTHVAMTflR c«iirteM* Kim) 
fordipulDX S&00 

AR3754 Radio Frequency Interference — 
How to find it and fix it InLerfe rence problems 
ur diallrafifig. htt cwaMc. Wiih the ievtintqu» 
m Ifirt boot, you can b^lp ienofe elecirrfliic peace 
m \\iui wnfhNftn>xl S1SJ0 

DOV4T Basic Electronics Frriwrrd h\ tk* 
Burtim tifNakftf Pefuumrf Ct»ve45 the mipon»ii 
aspcers of jppUed eicdronio and elccironics 

cofTumm^tni'Ti^ ^t_. y r 

OOV76 Second Level Basic Electronics 

Ptvpurfd In tin - Hurfau uf Navtil rVTWVEWi Se- 
LjLiel to Rushj hlecinmi(.?i. diOR^itili iriMUiu'ni ol 
ihe more iidvaTifed luvels of applied Lleclroiucfi, 
S9,95 

20N09S How To Read Schematics (4th 
Ed.) lr\ thmuhi li HeFrmgitm Written for tJK- 
hegmner tn ekxironics. bui ii olu> exmuiinv tn 
formmioA valuable m the hobbym and enginecr- 
kij; tecnnKXiui S 19.95 

WL3WOCP Radio Operator s World Atlas 
frr H\j/r Stmson UOCP Thv^ \% a compact 
(5x7), detailed, and comprehenvive world 
alia* dnifned to h? a consEom dak uip ci^mpan- 
inn to* radw operators. Si 7.95 



WWW Final Quantum Revelations Dr. 
Km I riiukanov uses not onh science hul 
revelation to answer difficult tmd profound 
question* about physical reality mid cosmic 

destiny. SJ4.95 

TECT787 Exploring the ?hysk* at tKe Un- 
liiiimii Dnlviu'se hy Milo Wulff Piieked with 
inutguing diwussinu?, hke, Wfui i^ the iirigin of 
the bus. n| i^iysics" and What t> ihe inunn- o] 
ipBtL ' \ simple and readable btiok on how 
muihemi.iiic* docafbcs the phytical tmivene 
and w tut pjradoxei and em^mas remain for an 
enterrm^tni! mind lo solve, wnh vpft ublKins oc 
the nature of «ihuomie pamcJes as sutM&ng ia- 
lerfcretxe pouems of spberical »a>«. &39.0O 



1994, T.ih fknks. This is a uondertul tank for 
ihe VHF-UEF manner ii>Uncr It evpljtiE> 
dbiiut the various radio Kind v antennas, the 
Liu v and i\m% fvimneihi'ics \\ tmaeitLihle 

service ineiudin^ die Secret Service, t-BI. 

roilitoiy. IRS. prisms. Fish & Wddlite, VlelXm- 
iiid' s of tier wlndowt. nuclear seiirch leaniv i.liI 
m.uls, Russijin fiFiiellites. Treasury Depi., wire 
less mteriiphoneji Tor concerts, and flu on. 
514.95, 

07A&6 Aeronautical Communications 
Handbook ^ Ruben l, Evans Exhausttvr, 
scholarly ifcaunent of sbonwave jeOMi.kuik.d 
listening. SI 9.95 

AR4025 Beyond Line of Sight. Shims 
tkiw nanus pusJsrd forward tiw di*ciner> of the 
propaaatBcn modei thai make VHF DX posst- 
We: cropu. qtoadBc-E* aurora and aumroJ E. 
metenr wjitrr I- tjyer pnijugaumi. tran^eqaa- 
lorul propagation and earl li -hum »n -earth 
SI 2.00 

TAB 447748 The Shortwave Listener's 
Q&A Book — Everything >ou nerd m kftcm io 
enjoy Shurlwave Listening t"Tti\rtinp reee^crv, 
acceH&orie*, antennas, frequenctes. and gettrng 
QSLs SWL is an exciting hobby . , that's 
wnftl gnt me iniere^ied in hiiitmilnp , . Wavne. 
$il$5 



TAB37109 Secreis of HF Circuit Design 
by Joseph /, Curr Written in elear rion- 

technical 1arguaite H L-ovsr* everything from 
a titer nas to trans islt irs $2 1 ,95 

TAB1 1065-1 Mastering Radio Frequency 
Circuits by Joe Cur, 4 1 I p It you're inLL-r 
ested in learning ahnui radio components and 
circuit;, this hook is preai' Plus there are a Inn 
nf \Jinple circinii y^m cm build, It ciplain^ 



how circuits work, abtuil test equipment, re- 
ceiver, the works. This will take a lot of the 
mystery oul of how radios work ... die easy 
way. This will be one of your heller %2\) ham in- 
vestments, 520.0ft 



DP919 73 Magazine Index 1960-1990 A 
t^rnplifttf index m evcrv snick 1 ;mhlish£d in 73 
MtiKozinr ihroityh 1990. IBM witlware 



WAYNES PICKS = 

WG2 The Million Dollar Video EtpLum bo« 
ju*a about on . iv can trterea. 1 ^ >oitt by 

Over a nrilliiin dcrilan iturugh the -rk.aL) raka in- 
telligent i use of pronionon Explain* in detail 
how you can act kn> of free ndverusine Liwte 
Wjvne ^hows. you ho* to beat the %y«iem 
S3M5 

-SEEK YOU" by The Ham Band— tlw titles 
include "Always on the mr 1 . "On the Monday 
Evening GfltyJiflC", "Radio Widow". *The Trip 
to Day ton". "'I lie Luiiicst* 1 -nul ^even more. Ham 
radio CD includes eotpeftftiCftS thut radio hams $v 
rhn.mn]i. This is an extremely entertaining CD 
and will strike a ehoril w'Hl> ,inv nadio htirn, SWL 
or XYL— an ideal present' SYCI) S15 SYTAPE 
$10. 

SB8657 Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden 
Curriculum Of Compulsory Schooling. 
Jir*Afj Gmio 11 you ettj^tyrd 'Dedan; Wax*, jou'U 
enjoy ibis ako A *jme Green recrromended 
readme. 59*95, 

WGm LEARN THE CODE There are 1*0 
nay* to team the code. ( 1 1 the easy way. i2 1 
eresryme ej^e'v way Your choice. There are t*o 
?j«rkK of ci:*lf you need tn know — on?<5 wprm 
ycu con leant in lew than an hour, the other i.2$ 
wpm! lakes longer, but nowhere near as long a 
you probably thmk Sure, you can aha learn u ai 
M wpm, if you vriint. but that jusl wastes your 
time 

Learning u> wupy code is rust like learning to 
type or piay the piano, if you have to spp and 
think, you can' i do it. It ha* tu he mude an turn til > 
ie, so if you go the uHUiil code training torn of 
starting xlnw .likI speed itiji up you are screwing 
up, That hruies you Io thai dreaded pla&BtU .H 
abovn Ith wpm. where you've readied the hraia*s 
cfocfc speed Then you have io sian all aver Irnan 
*4.-rjEeh and do ii the way you should have tn the 
first place With Uncle Wayne's tape you >ian 
nghi i 'jj ai JO wpm and train ytnr hand to wnle 
*^t yoai EMr* rL^r 

Uncle Wayne tive$ you a choice on the 5 




wpm code test You can nther buv uV H Zrppo 
one hnur metbod of paving the tea. which t> 
ernirmou<l> over-priced at S5 uwder 75-EZX ch- 
yoo can bay two tapes . . , one. The Genesis, 
takes about an hour to leach you the code chaiac 
rcn i %5M5 — TTHWi and the other. The StickL-r 
(SS.95 — 73T06) gitea you an hour iff Aendishl^ 
difficult practiCB 4l G wpm. Then there's the 1 5 
wpm Back Breaker i$5.95 7VT11), in case 
you fur some maaochiMk; reason want to bother 
te.trnim; the code at t3 [k'\ And the ever popular 
C'oiimgeous 2i) wpm tape (S3 Srj 73T20), ll 
you find you've become u code fanatic, there' & 
ihe :? wpm Moid toggle; (S5.9? 73T25) 
whieh will Bftfvc you npiii 

Until wiser herds . . . lt. head*. . .oe able to 
dump the code requirement I mm the ham c*am>, 
the Ei Zrppo and Couraj*eous are ihe least frus- 
trating route to ham nirvana. And by ihe way. 
anyone can learn the code ii ibey go about it 
I "otic WayneS »ay. 



SOFTWARE 



GGTE Horw Tutor Fro* tccinKr to Extra Cla» 
Code Dxm I &> m-rt 100 innj> |er mrrajjc sumlird tx 
Fmnwiidi mmk Ckm; vmir own drills. Eunu cnsfcvni 
to HX ranmrrL Ikippy tor IBM PC, XT. A 1 

FSn'^irti,anpishle4 

GGSlfr \tt*m I umr 5 3ST & Afc $ If .» 

GG31/l.M»rst lui.n > ftst SH.50 

r T GdVDV5 vmld lulit ^v Diik SW.9S 

GGAUV3<i(]ldi:dKimH,5 Disk S2M5 

W5GWHO Ham Operator Education Pack- 
age Software. Novice— txtra for PC's, conianih 
bnth 1 ! -r and 5 1/4" dlila $&$$ 

W5GWNSW Ho-Code Ham Radio Software 
Package tor PC'S, certains both 3 l/2 m and 
> 1A4* Atk- $2W 

Lanze Coda Programs-H Available on S MA" * 

disk.) bexpmBVf ocmpkir mkH- pnJp. . ■ 

kk« 4e CM^IM GnKilWaDd UV EBM vLtnpai 

LAST CHANCE ITEMS 



Mea. rfedfraflb inJaJr wpined R"<" iftr^twni. tannin, 
Kfaotnk- :>inS4i. JuaMim ind unmlaied iVEi ample 





IBM Pan? 


fumcn^kife I»vt4 


Pnce 


rHJVKC 


LflflMOl 


LZCtJMDt 


SU5S 


Trtft 


tzmm 


N/A 


51 -1.9$ 


General 


UIBMtn 




SH.W 


Advance 


LZTBMiU 


N/A 


SI9.95 


1 w-.< 


LZIBMG5 


17r()lvTU5 


S19.95 



Add JIM for* 1/2" TliAk 



VIS Study Card 5 t 


'ontpMl. up i" :Uie 1 


;bh Cards 


w-ith Kev Wiwidb, I Inderlmed. tyiit rm hack. 


i-"L:]juJuh 


■dirked out SchemaliLA jt v*jur fl^^r^llp^ I - 1 


srco?iiSFi;u.Yby 


»feAn^MIT 




N< IV(t"E 


VIMll 


SILfS 


TFCH 


vistc 


lejs 


ammfii 


%'IS03 


tL95 


^DVAJSMTED 


VBM 


1S.*5 


RA 


visas 


1445 



ONLY A FEW LEFT 



SAM2248a IC Users Casebook A 

^tmjst' for any hobbisi's workshop, aw 
ideal operation amplifiers, inverting and 
nonin verting followers, linear amplifiers, 
active filters, digital circuts and wave- 
form jienetuiois and timers. $12.9? 



SAM48441 178 IC Designs & 
Applications A comprehensive 
coUeetion of linear developments 
for electronic design and bnsjc applica- 
tions. $12.95 



ARRL BOOKS = 

ARJ995 ARRL 10*5 Handbook 47lst EdJ Features: 
added DSP, improved treatment of Pi and Fi-L, all new 

all-digilal-Jogic, plus |#ts cnon?-. S30,00 

AR10B6-4 ARRL Qpeialiftg; Mmiuai (4th FdY> Infor- 
mation on how to make the best use of your station, in- 
cluding: interfacing home computers, OSCAR, VHF- 
UHF. $18.00 

AR3657 QRP Notrfnigk ftv Dave DeMaw WIFR Pre- 
sents construction projects for the QRP operator 

Si o,DO 

ARim W1FB 1 ? Design Notebook by Dave DeMaw 
WIFB Filled wiin simple practical projects Lhac can be 
built using readily available components and common 
hand tools. S1IMW 

AR0402 Solid State Design Good, basic ini'orrrtijUon, 
circuit designs and applications; descriptions nf re- 
ceivers, transmitters, power supplies, aiad test equip- 
ment. SiS.00 

AR4173 Now You>e Talking! All You Need To Get 
Your First Ham Radio License (2nd Edition) A 

complete study guide (or the Technician and Mo vice 
written warn. Practical information every beginner 
needs is written clearly and simply and in small dnses. 
$19.00 

AR4971 ARRL Rcptaicr Directory 1935-1996 

19,00(1- listings with digipeaters, bandpiajis, CTCS5 
(PL(TM)) tone chart, frequency coordinators, ARRL 
special stirv'iee dubi, and beacon listings from 14 MHz, 
tt>24Gffe.$7jOO 

AR3398 The DXCC Companion by Jim Kearman 



ANTENNAS 



jtK/i' Spells out in simple, straightforward terras what 
you need to he a successful DXer. SS.nn 

AR 1 250 Log Book-Spiral $3.50 

AR3E77 The ARRL Spread Spectrum .Source Root. 

From a deceptively simple beginning, a group of ex- 
perimenters set out to develop first theoretical and later 
practical systems for spread spectrum communica- 
tions. This book consists of articles, papers and gov- 
ernment reports that document the process whereby 
amateur spread spectrum progressed from the drawing 
board to the airwaves $20.00 

AR2960 Transmission Line Transformers (2nd Ed,} 
by Dr. ferry Sevkk W2FM1 Practical designs and spe- 
cific information on construction techniques, and 
sources of material. 520,00 

AR385I Hints and Kinks Ideas for setting up your 
gear for comfortable, efficient operation. SHK0O 

ARRL License Manuals Complete FCC question 
pooh with answers. 

AR41S1 Technician Class $ 6.00 

AR46SS General Class 1 1 2.0U 

AR3274 Advanced Class S S.GG 

AK32&2 Extra Class S £.00 

AR3I85 The Satellite Experimenter^ Handbook, 
(2nd Ed,) by Martin DavidafJ K2UBC Expanded and 
revised. Focusing on satellites built by and for die in- 
ternational ratio amateur community. S20.00 

AR3Q30 Your Gateway to Packet Radio (2nd Ed.) 

Tells everything you need to know about this popular 
new mode. $12.00 



AR4I14 Low Profile Amateur Radio For the Ham 

who lives where antennas are frowned upon. From 
biding your antenna to operating with low power. 
This boots tells you how to get on the air using 
these tehniques, and others, without calling attention 
to yourself. SSjUO 

UE220 The Easy Wire Antenna Handbook by 
Dave Ingram K4TWJ. All of til* needed dimensions 
for a full range of easy to build and erect '%ky 
wires.' 1 $9.95 

WGPB7034 All About Cubical Quad Anten- 
nas by William Orr and Smart Cowan "The Clas- 
sic" on Quad design, theory, construction, operation. 
New feed and matching systems. New data. Si 1. 95 

TAB 3270P Practical Antenna Handbook— 

Second Edition, 1994, Joseph Carr; Tab Books, 
This 560-page book is a real treasure. 5 am with 

the fundamentals of antenna and feedline theory, 
explains about propagation of all kinds, and then 
provides a ton of easy antenna construction projects 
Covers antennas and feeders for all bands. The 
explanations are simple and well illustrated, with 
stunt mada, where it's unavoidable, but it won't bog 
you down. It even has the ZL- Special antenna, 
which I've used on 20m with some spectacular DX- 
ing success. A low angle of radiation and made it so 
I could always work the rare stuff first . . < Wayne. 
S26.95. 

AN4734 ARRL Antenna Book The new I6ih 

Edition represents the best and most highly regarded 
information on antenna fundamentals, transmission 
line*, design, and construction of wire antennas 

moo 

AR01 94 Antenna Compendium Vol. 1 Materi- 
als on verticals, quads, loops, yagjs, reduced size an- 
tennas, haluns, Smith Charts, antenna polarization. 
$111.1)0 

AR2545 Antenna Compendium Vol. 2 Covers 

verticals, yagts, quads, multiband and broadband 
system 1 ;, antenna selection. $12.0(1 

AR26S6 Companion Software for Antenna 
Compendium Vol. 2 5 1/4" MS-DOS floppy 
SlO.Ofl 

AR4017 Antenna Compendium Vol. 3 More 
verticals, yagis, quads, phis loops, arrays, mobile, 
direction finding, controlled currents, computerized, 

UHF/VHF/PACKET 

ARTS CI U.S. Repeater Mapbook by Robert 
Martin The Guide for traveling radio amateurs. S9,95 

TPO01 The Basic Guide to VHF/UHF Ham 
Radio by Edward M. Noli Provides a first rate in^ 
traduction to the 2.6 and 1.25 meter bands as well 

as 23 r 33, and 70cm. §05 

AR3959 Your Packet Companion Perfect for the 



installation, overloads, plus 40 new articles for 
beginner's to advanced, 51400 

AR4661 Antennas and Techniques for Low- 
Band DXing can he your ticket to low-bond success. 

Drawing on ±e experiences of successful DXers and 
the author's own considerable experience, John De- 
voldere, QN4UN, shares the dps and techniques that 
can make the difference between a station that takes 
part in a contest and one that wins it I $24,04 

AR3319 Physical Design of Yagi Antennas Av 

David t$* Leesun W6QHS provides the tunls. here to 
dey^n and build robust Yagj antennas, using sotind 
mechanical engineering principles. You need no 
longer fear the consequences of wind or ice storms on 
your antennas. Willi this information, yon can build or 
u beef up" existing Yagis S20.00 

AR2&18 WiFBs Antenna Notebook by Dave 

DeAfaw WIFB Get the 1>csl performance out of unob- 
trusive wire antennae LUid verticals. Build tuners and 
SWR bridges. $10.00 

WGFW107 All About Vertical Antennas&v 

Willi am Orr Comprehensive coverage- Of amateur 
communications. SI 1.95 

WGP8704.2 Beam Antenna Handbook by 

William Orr and Smart Cowan Everything you need 
to know alxsut beam design, construcnon, and opera- 
tion. SJ1.95 

WGP87Q77 Simple, Low-Cost Wire Antennas 
For Radio Amateurs by William On and $&m 
Cowan All New! Low-cost, multi-band antennas; in- 
expensive beams, "Invisible" antennas for hams in 
"tough" locadonsl New data. Sil.95 

AR22Q0 Antenna Impedance Matching by Wd- 

fretf N. Carftn Most comprehensive hCK>k written on 
using Smith Charts ti solving impedance ntatching 
problems. S2Q,mi 

AR0410 Yagi Antenna Design A Ham Radio se 
ries polislied and expanded by Dr. Lawson. $15.00 

AR2995 Reflections will help dispel the half-truths 
and outright myths that many believe are true about 
transuussion lines, standing waves, antenna matching 
re-fleicted power and antenna tuners, $20*00 

AR3113 Reflections— Software for IBM 5-1/4" 
$1OjO0 



packet Ofiwcomer. SS.ftfl 

AR3078 Your VHF Companion Ejtptore u^e fasci- 

natiinj activities on the VHF bands, FM and repeaters. 
packet. CW & SSB, Satellites. ATV. nan&mirter hunt- 
ing and more. $&0Q 

03R02 RTTY Today by Qtitift Ingram KfTWJ Most 

comprehensive RTTY guide ever published. S8*50 



BOOKS FOR BEGINNERS 



TAB4354 The Beginner's Handbook of 
Amateur Radio, Third Edition by Cltry Luster 

W5ZPV, 395 pages, Wonderful book for newcom- 
ers. It is basic and well illustrated Lven if you 
have all the other ham handbooks, you" 11 still find 
iliis one useful. $22.00 

WoGWNV Ho-Code Video, Manual, Part 97 
Rules l^earn how to he a ham radio operator. 
$29.55 

WSGWNC Technician Class License Manu- 
al: New No-Code f?v Gordon West This, book 



covers everything you need to become a Techni- 
cian Class Ham. Every question and answer on the 
examinations is found in this one book. FCC" Form 
610 application, S9SS 

XTAL-1 The Crystal Set Handbook by Phil 
Anderson W0XI. Want to give a kid an eKciting 
present':' Or maybe yourself? Crystal sets are 
alive and fun. Rere'i a whole book packed with 
crystal set circuity that anyone can build. N«w Stall 
saving those oatmeal boxes* okay? 133 pages 
SID.25 



ARJ645 Satellite Antbulugy The latest information 
on QSCARs 9 through 1 J as well as ihe RS satellites, 
the use of digital modes, tracking antennas, RUDAK. 
nLiertffiurnputer, and more! $10jO0 

AR4483 Weathff Satellite Handbook (4th Ed J by 

Dr. Ralph Taggarf WA8DQT Enpanded and revised to 
reflect today's weaiher-fan satellite technology. 
$20.00 

AR4653 Companion Software for Weatltar Satellite 
Handbook 5 l/V MS-DOS Floppy, SIQ.flO 

Ak20Si Complete DX'er (Znd Ed,) by Sob Locker 
W9KI Learn how to hunt DX and obtain hard-to-get 
QSL cards. S 12.0* 

AR3762 Your QRP Operating Companimi No spe- 
cial rigs or expensive equipment to enjoy the excite- 
ment and challenge of low-power operating. $6.00 



AR3 W QRP Classics Compilation of ARRL puhh- 
caUong on building; receivers, transmitters, tntris- 
oeivGft, aceessorjes. S12hOO 



AR4270 FCC Rule Book A must for every active 
radio amateur. $9,011 

AR0356 Morse Code: The Essential La u gunge 
by L Peter Gamk Jr. W3DKV Expanded and re- 
vised in its 2nd edition. How to handle distress cans 

heard not only on the hambands but on 
maritime and aircraft frequencies $6.00 

AR3^3 Understanding Basic Electronics 
An ARRL book 314 hig pages. This explains every- 
thing very simply : the math, DC, AC, transistors, even 
tubes (wow ]}„ Dirt cneap at $17. Isn't it about time 

you understood the fundamentals? $17.00 



WAYNE WRITES- 

WG1 We The People Declare War On Our 
Lousy Government— 3 60p sofc cover. This is 
Wayne + s report explaining what the major prob- 
lems are facing both New Hampshire and the coun- 
try, and proposing simple, inexpensive solutions: a 
simpte way to have government departments hap- 
pily cut their expense by 50& within three yeans; 
Itow to cut the cost of incarcerating prisoners by 
over 9Q%; how to end welfare: how to reduce me 
deficit: how to cut medical costs and improve 
health care; how to cut school costs and improve 
schools. An absolute steal at $13. 

WG4 20/2* Foresight— Twenty I tip update* on 
the Declare War book — 320p. Further prfjposals 
for .solvina critical American problems, such as a 
new approach to financing small businesses, how 
to finance Russia and other countries and maloe a 
profit doing it, the real dope on hioeleeirornagnei- 
icA : . a new kind of poJytechnical university, a new 
electronics technology, wby Africa is in such a 
mess, why Perot bombed, how to have tuition-free 
universities, a plan for making Congress turn hon- 
est, etc. Plenty more. Ridiculously priced at $10. 



WG3 Submarine Life in WWII 60p Wayne* 

uory of his adventures on the USS Drum 
S5-228 on five war patrols in the Pacific in 1943- 
45. Whafs it really like on a submarine when 
you're being depth charged? And what's the day- 
to-day life on a submarine like? Did you see the 
movie Das Boot'/ Exciting <auft and only $7.50. 

WG6 Uncle Wayue T s Caribbean Adventures — 

96p. Wayne's adventures scuba diving all around 
the Caribbean, visiting ham operators, and sightsee- 
ing, if you're interested in how &o travel economi- 
cally, you'll get some great ideas from this. He 
starts out with his "Diving, the Wimp Sport." 
You n ll Luvc die visits to 1 J inlands in 21 days trip. 
A uneasily S7.S&. 

WG7 Uncle Wayne's Travels* — 52p. Wayne trav- 
els to Russia, London, Aspen, St. Pierre, Munich, 
Vieuna r Krakow, and Prague without il costing 
nearly as much as you might think. Cheap for you 
too, at SS m. 

WG9 Wayne Talks: •■ Dayton' 1995-90 minute 
tape- What he would have said if he*d been asked to 
speak. $5.00 



CODE TAPES ^ 

73T05 "Genesis" $5.95 5 wpm— This begin- 
ning tape, takes you through the 26 letters* 10 num- 
bers, and necessary punctuation, complete with prac- 
tice every step of die way. 

73T06 "The Stickler" $5.95 6+ wpm— fhis i.s 

the practice tape lor those who survived the 5 wpm 
tape, and it's also the tape for the Novice and Techni- 
cian licences. It is comprised of one solid hour of 
code. Characters are set at 13 wpm and .spaced at 5 
wpm. 

73T13 "Back Breaker" $5.95 1.H wmn— Code 

groups again., ai a bri^k 13+ wpm so you'll be really 



at ease when you sit down in front of a steely-eyed 
volunteer examiner who Starts, sending you plain lan- 
guage code at only 13 per. 

73T20 "Courageous' 1 $5.95 20+ wpm Congrat- 
ulations! Okay, the challenge of code is what's gouen 
you this far, so don't quit now. Go for (lie extra class 
license. We send the code faster dian 2(1 per. 

73T25 "The Mind Boggier" 55,95 25+ wpm 

Fiendishly generated hy kindly nld Uncle Wayne for 
hams with a strong need for self punishment. Once 
you've conquered 25 per let link know if you need a 
50 wpm tape. 



llJncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form T 

You mny order by mail, telephone, or fax. All payments are to be in UK funds. Allow I 
weeks for deli very. (Prices subject to change without notice if suppliers increase prices.) 



Item 



Title 



Gty, 



Price 



Total 



S h ipping ; A I US oiders add J5.00 shipping- g|-| | p p | N G 

snipped UPS. (Please provide street address.) 

Make checks payante lo "Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf. " | Q XA L 

Foreign Ofd&rS: Choose one; I I surface snipping I I air stifipfig. 

(Surface delivery rr^ay m& I to 3 months.) 
Note: The actual foreign shipping ocsts will be additional to reguter shifting and handting lees. 

Name 



Street 
City _ 



State 



Zip 



TOTAL $ 



Check/Money Order 



I lAE riMC L'VISA $10 minimum for credit card orders 
Card # Expiration Date 



Signature 



Phone # 



Telephone: (603) 924-4117 (800) £34-3458 FAX: (603) 924-8513 uw io*s 
Mail: Uncle Wayne s Bookshelf, 70 Route 202N, Peterborough, NH 03458 



□YES! Send me 12 issues of 73 at the low rate of §19.97. (Save 43% of cover price.) 

Canada add 57 plus 51 .40 GST. Foreign add $9 surface; $42.00 airmail. 

□YES! Send ma 12 issues of Radio Fun ai trie low rate of $12.97. (Save 20% of cover price.) 



L 



Canada add $7 plus S. 70 GST. Foreign add $15 surface; $mno airmal 



J 



AfEIV PRODUCTS 



Number 27 on your Feedback card NAVAL ELECTRONICS INC. 



Compiled by Victor Lapuszynski 



KAWIN SOFTWARE 

KaWin, the only Windows program to 
support Kantronics TNCs in Host mode, 
is now available for download from the 
Internet's World Wide Web. KaW- 
in provides concurrent access to 
four TNCs, to both ports of rnuFti- 
port TNCs, to simultaneous VHF 
packet and HF non-packet 
modes, for up to eight attached 
transceivers and as many as 26 
concurrently connected stations 
on each radio? Each connect, 
as well as the background activity on 
each TIMC port, is displayed in its own 
window using color- coded index tabs to 
select the active window. 

KaWin is a fully featured communica- 
tions program offering binary tile trans- 
fers with concurrent chat, send and dis- 
play of international character sets, ex- 
tended ASCII graphics, and ANSI color 
graphics. Brag files and Quick Key sets 
are enhanced hy intelligent macros thai 
expand into everything from the current 
WX report or time of day, to commands 
that key and unkey your transmitter. 

Users of Kantronics Kam All Mode 
TNCs will find nonpacket modes have 
become as easy to manage as packet 




operations KaWin fully exploits the en- 
hanced Host Mode features of late-mod- 
el Kam TNCs to provide faster keying 
and unkeying response In CW and RT- 
TY operation. Critical operating parame- 
ters such as AFSK shift are instantly 
reset with each HF mode 
change. KaWins unique 
AFSK Tone Calculator 
solves one of the oldest 
problems of amateur HF 
digital operating: "What fre- 
quency am I really transmit- 
ting on?" 

KaWin may be download- 
ed from the KaWin WWW Home Page, 
h ftp -JJ www, mutadv.com/kawinA Others 
may choose to download trorn the /kaw- 
in directory at the FTP site, ftp r csn.net. 
This provides a fully working copy of 
KaWin, limited only by an insistent "nag 
meter 1 ' that limits each evaluation ses- 
sion to about 15 minutes. Registration of 
KaWin turns off the nag meter and is 
available for US $79.00. For more infor- 
mation, contact: Stan Huntting KF01A } 
4655 Pleasant Ridge Rd., Boulder, CO 
$0301; (303) 444 2311 (voice). (303) 444 
2314 (fax); E-mail: stan@ 
mutadv.com. Or circle Reader Service 
No. 201. 



NOVATECH 

Novafech Instruments, Inc., intro- 
duces the Model DDS4m Direct Digital 
Synthesizer (DDS) Module, The DDS4m 
is a low-cost, 34-MHz signal source that 
combines small size, excellent stability, 
fast switching, and low noise for only 
$395 in single-unit quantities. On a 3.5" x 
4.5" board, the DDS4m simultaneously 
outputs a precise sine wave and an ac- 
curate TTL clock signal. The output fre- 
quency is programmable from 1 kHz up 
to a maximum oi 34 MHz in steps as 
small as 0.02 Hz. Typical phase noise is 
-90 dBc at 1 kHz offset from carrier. The 
desired frequency is selected by setting 
a 31 -bit binary number either manually 
using DIP switches or remotely by HC- 
M OS -compatible parallel input lines. The 
DDS4m contains a quartz crystal oscilla- 
tor that provides excellent stability of 10 




ppm per year. Fast switching is enabled 
since the parallel input can be driven up 
to about 25 MHz by external customer- 
supplied control hardware. 

For more information, contact: Bob 
O'Brien. Nov a tech Instruments, Inc., 
1530 Eastlake Ave. E, t #303, Seattle, 
WA 981 02; (206) 322-1562 ', (206) 328- 
6904 (fax). Or circle Reader Service No. 
202. 



APS 

Associated Professional Systems an- 
nounces the release of its Spread Spec- 
trum Development Program (SSDP). 
The SSDP is an IBM PC ISA format 
board which can produce three indepen- 
dent Linear Recursive Sequence 




streams with lengths up to 
4,394,967,295 bits long, passing through 
a programmable logic matrix which al- 
lows various data modulation and 
switching scenarios. The SSDP contains 
an onboard Direct Digital Synthesizer 
and allows external chipping rates up to 
30 MHz. Several RF daughter boards 
are available to Interface with the SS- 
DP. It comes with a Windows control 
program and C drivers and is ideal for 
testing and development of Wireless 
and Spread Spectrum systems. 

For more information, contact: 
Richard Schwarz, Associated Profes- 
sional Systems, 3003 Latrobe Court, 
Abingdon, MD 21009; (410) 515- 
3883, (410) 661-2760 (fax). Or circle 
Reader Service No. 203. 



Naval Electronics Inc. introduces the 
HTS-3 miniature speaker-amplifier. Its 
smaller than a bread box— one for those 
loaves you get with your soup. I'm talk- 
ing 4-1/2" high by 2-3/4" wide by 2-1 IT 
deep. Boy, is it handy! My first applica- 
tion was to use it to amplify my HT re- 
ceiver output and give it some beef. 
Then I needed some more pep from a 
tape recorder for transcribing notes. And 
then I grabbed it to help track down a 
problem with my hi-fi system. We all 
neod a small speaker-amplifier around 
the shack and test bench. 

Naval did a nice design job on this 
one. It's powered by four AA batteries. 
You can use Ni-Cd rechargeables and 
it'll keep 'em charged if you plug in an 8- 
14 volt source— with either polarity! It 
senses a lack of activity and shuts off 
until there's action. Great for using your 
HT to monitor a repeater. There's also a 
recorder jack which will turn on a tape 
recorder and record whatever is coming 
through the repeater. And turn it off af- 
ter. Heaven forbid you should miss 
something. 

The HTS-3 sells for $34.95 (plus $4 
UPS and $3 for packing, plus tax for 




Florida shipments) and will make a valu- 
able addition to your shack. Its small 
enough to throw into a corner of a suit- 
case and take on trips, thus improving 
the sound of miniature radios and tape 
recorders, as well as HTs, 

For more info, contact Naval Elec- 
tronics, 5417 Jetview Circle, Tampa FL 
33634; (813) 885-6091. Tell n em Wayne 
sent you, or else. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 204. 



TELEX 

Telex introduces its new 
Hy-Gain DX77 Advanced 
Vertical Windom with fea- 
tures surpassing any verti- 
cals on the market. It puts 
the ham world of 10 
through 40 meters at your 
fingertips without the need 
for ground radial wires, 
and up to 1,000 watts of 
RF output. Automatic band 
switching and low angle of 
radiation allow for en- 
hanced DX capabilities. 

The Hy-Gain DX77 fea- 
tures superior quality and 
reliable mechanical de- 
sign, with double -w all tub- 



< 




ing, steel mast clamps, 
and all stainless steel 
hardware. The 29' verti- 
cal also features an 
easy tilt mount that 
makes lowering it for 
tuning a one-person 
job. It comes with 
Telex's 2-year limited 
antenna warranty. 

For more informa- 
tion, contact: Telex 
Communications, Inc., 
8601 E. Cornhusker 
Highway, P.O. Box 
5579, Lincoln. NE 
68505; (402) 467-5321, 
(402) 467-3279 (tax). 
Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 205. 





/ 



Wl E*»CE.I$MJ 1.0. nc. 




*rH ocil^Fmi-4^ t:n. \ri\7. 
-SMWl e:EJ a U 

F9 '1 



NYE ENGINEERING 

NYE Engineering can now supply the 
FS73 'Signal Cube".* RF field strength 
meter in the form of a digital "S* meter 
connected directly into the RF/IF section 
of a radio receiver, !n this form, model 
FS73C will provide a much higher reso- 
lution of signal strength than a conven- 
tional communications receiver type "S" 
meter. 

The original product, the FS73 with 



telescoping dipole antenna. Is a calibrat- 
ed RF field strength meter. The new 
FS73C connects directly to a receiver to 
be a digital signal strength ("S") meter. 
The selectivity and sensitivity of the re- 
ceiver is utilized. The price of either is 
$1 69.00 plus $5.00 shipping. 

For more information, contact: NYE 
Engineering Co. inc.. 4020 Gait Ocean 
Drive, Suite #606, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 
33308; (305) 586-3997, (305) 537-3534. 
Or circle Reader Service No. 206. 



88 73 Amateur Radio Today • October. 1 995 



Ultra Compact Handhelds 



TOP NOTCH™ 

Mutti-functioo knob - 
controls programming 

and volume. 



PTTTHUMB SWITCH 
ErgonomicaJly designed, 
conveniently located, 
insures maximum comfort. 



ALPHANUMERIC 
DISPLAY 
Allows 4-cftaracter 
labelling of important 
frequencies. 



SUPER LOUD AUDIO 
State of art miniaturization 
gives! greatest RX volume 
and clarity. 



ARTS 

Tracks range of 2 iderrtiealty 
programmed KTs. \ 



>JILf ™U 






"This HTis the first 
amateur radio with 
built-in Digital Coded 
Squelch (DCS) for 
RX and TX" 

Tor a radio this small 
and rugged, the audio 
is genuinely LOUD!" 



7 used ADMS-1 to 
program my FT-1Q 
when we went 
camping, and the 
new ARTS system 
to keep track of my 
kids on the traits!'* 

"Yaesu did it again!* 



m 



commercia 



_ adeHTs 

loaded with new 
features and a choice 



RUBBER GASK "" 
Protects against corrosion 
from dust, ram or spray. 



12 V DC JACK ^ 
Use optional E-DC-5B 
power adapter in your car 
for 5 W PWR 0/P. 



Specifications 

• Frequency Coverage 
FT-10R 

2m: RX: 1 40-174 MHz 
TX: 144-148 MHZ 

FT-40R 

70cm: RX: 420-470 MHz 
TX: 430-450 MHz 

• Choice of 4 keypad options 
(6, 16 or Deluxe and 
DVRSl 6 Keypads) 

• Auto Range Transpond 
System™ (ARTS'*) 

• MIL-STD 810 

• High Audio Output 
•12 V DC Direct Input 

• Alphanumeric Display 

• RX/TX Battery Savers 

• Digital Coded Squelch 
(DCS) 

• Digital Voice Recording 
System (DVRS) 
W/FTT-10/A16S 

• True FM for better voice 
clarity 

• High Speed Scanning 
System 

• 2.5 and 5 W available 

• Full line of accessones 



run zcoot JW ^ "* - 



jipo flpT 



YAESU 



Sf& BTXSWC9 g* 1 



RV 



YAMJSU 



VLWLCK STW I 



tllRMWOVn 






LW LCK 
MR MW VF 



4SW E 5A« 6R^T ^ 



»«* * BV 



Fn-10/A16S 

16-Key, CTCSS Enc/Dec, 

DCS Enc/Dec, Digital Voice Recorder 

99 Channels 



MR *° L 



m vpodw 9 



FTMQ/A16 

16-Key, CTCSS Ere, 

DCS Enc/Dec, 

30 Channels 



FTT-10/A06 

6 -Key, CTCSS Erie, 

DCS Enc/Dec, 

30 Channels 



FTT-10/A16D 

16-Key, CTCSS Enc/Dec, 

DCS Enc/Dec, 

99 Channels 



1 "* FT-10/4NR is a totally new I IT concept! 
_ jilt to rugged, tough military spec 
commercial radio standards inside and out, its 
small, powerful, fealu re-packed and ready to roll out 
in four versions! ! 

Fbur different keypads - count 'em, POUR! 
First true user-choice customized HTon the 
market, offers a 6. and three 16 keypad selections 
plus 25 and 5 W battery choices, too! Easy for 
Yaesu, the electronics are in the keypad. Easy for 
you, they're already installed. Just pick the one that 
suits your HT"stvHe v ! 

New technology high-efficiency' speaker design 
provides super-loud audia No small surprise - after 
all it is Yaesu! 

First ever, amateur HT rated MIL-STD 81(1! 
What else could you hope fur? This, maybe. Dual 
Watch - see two frequencies displayed simultane- 



ously in the display No other single band HT has 
this feature, Another Yaesu exclusive, the Auto 
Range Transpund System™ (ARTS™) alerts you 
visually and audibly when a companion HT is out of 
simplex range. Most radio functions, are controlled 
of the Top Notch™, the neatly placed knob on the 
HTThis minimizes complex key sequences. Only 
Yaesu has this. Digital Coded Squelch (DCS) - for 
convenient semi-private operation. Digital Voice 
Recording System {DVRS) - records voice messages 
for playback, and received messages. And, of course 
Omni-Glow^ display because you won t be able to 
put this one down! 

The FT-10/4IIR is a military-tough, 
commercial-quality force in a small package. 
Exactly what you've come to expect from Yaesu! 
Better get one now, before the dealer sells out! 




FT-51R 

Dual Band 
v/rrh Windows 
Spectrum Scope \ 
Alphanumeric, 
Scrolling Menu 
Battery Voltage 
Display 2 or 5 W- 
World's smallest 
dual band HT! 




FT-11/41R 

Slim, trim and 

powerful! 

Alphanumeric, 

Compact Battery 

Design, Up/Down 

Thumb Control 

RX/TX Batteiy 

Savers, 

2 or 5 W Available. 



Performance without compn>mi$e. m 

© 1995 Yaesu USA, 1 721 Edwards Road, 
Cerritos, CA 90703, (310) 404-2700. 
Specrfica iforis subject to change without notice, 
Specifications guaranteed only within amateur tends. 
Some accessones ana. or options are standard tn certain 
areas. Check with your local Yaesu deafer for specific 
tfe tails, 





(get a FREE custom travel ease, too! 



• * 



iw^t 



I 





TUNE 



AlPfATT 






51 . 



n a 



lit ~t n n n 



iin" 



i 



i 



? a 



p s- 



SCAN 



•< *X 



MJN 







u 



H*\A 




HF TRANSCEIVER 



For the Amateur Radio enthusiast, going "beyond bounds is what it s all about. That s 
whv Kenwood created the TS-50S, the world's smallest and smartest HF transceiver. 
The choice is yours: you can mount it in a vehicle, take it on a DX-pedition, or even 
install it permanently as a base station transceiver Yet despite its size, the TS-50S 
provides a maximum output of 10AW and the sort of sophisticated Features normally 
found only inside a shack. Take for example the 100 memory channels for independent 
storage of transmit/receive parameters, the microprocessor-controlled DDS with 
innovative •'fuzzy" control, and Kenwood's own A1P for superior dynamic range. 
There's also a powerful menu system. IF shift and CW reverse mode for interference 
reduction, TF-SET, and a noise blanker— plus everything you need for split-frequency 
operations. So, if you want HF operation beyond bounds, check out the TS-50S at your 
favorite authorized Kenwood Amateur Radio Dealer toda\ ! 



I ? 



5D0kHz-3QMHz general covcrag 

receiver 
I D0S( Direct Digital Synthesizer) i 

fuzzy logic control 

Large LCD panel with digital bar rr 
_ Auto-mode capability 
I Menu system 

AIP (Advanced intercept Poind 

* ■ itdioble AGC Graiit (SLOW/FAST) 
-mode squelch 

CW reverse mode 

Full break-in and semi break-in 

20dB attenuator 

Multi-function microphone supplied 
■ RF output power control 

(lOOVK SOW. 1DW) 
ionol 500Hz CW filter fYK-107 

Optional external antenna 

runer(AT-SO) 
I Optional computer interface 



MEffl 



95ARO-1219 



KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION 

AMATEUR RADIO PRODUCTS GROUP 
PO Bci 22?*S 22DJ E. Oomn-^uez Si tofig Bea=r, C**kma 9G6Q1 5745 

Customer wpportBrocmifes f 31 01 639-5300 
Repv IxxM^msJPmfa iftOOj KENWOOD Bufefln Board Serves (BBS) 1310} 761 S28-5 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 

607Q Kflclrol Road. Missisaauga. Onlano, Canada L5T tSB